COVID-19 resources

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Covid-19 Insight: issue 6

Care Quality Commission

This report shares regional data on the designated settings that allow people with a COVID-positive test result to be discharged safely from hospital, and the latest data on registered care home provision. It also looks at how providers have collaborated to provide urgent and emergency care during the pandemic. In addition, the report updates data on outbreaks and staff absences in homecare services; numbers of deaths of people detained under the Mental Health Act; numbers of deaths of people with a learning disability; breakdown of deaths in adult social care settings by ethnicity.

Last updated on hub: 22 December 2020

COVID-19 insights: impact on workforce skills

Skills for Health

Based on the Covid-19 Workforce Survey, this report explores the extent of the pandemic’s impact on the health sector employers and employees. It reveals that the pressure of working in the healthcare sector during the pandemic has led to many staff retiring or resigning. As a result, nearly half of the respondents report that their organisation is planning on increasing recruitment over the next 6 months. However, several organisations have frozen training activities which has led to skills gaps. The pandemic has brought along new ways of working which has meant that COVID-19 awareness and knowledge relating to social distancing as well as infection prevention and control have become crucial for healthcare staff. In addition, the sector has seen a change in the clinical management of patients with COVID-19 infection as well as an increase in home working and the use of PPE – however, 40.6% of respondents state that their organisation was not adequately prepared for this sudden shift in working methods. Many respondents report on issues obtaining PPE as well as inadequate IT systems and digital skills to facilitate remote working. As a result of the pandemic, 44.3% of employers report that their organisational structure will look different. To aid revised organisational structures and potential new ways of working, employers state that they would like immediate support with staff wellbeing processes, employee engagement and workforce planning.

Last updated on hub: 03 September 2020

COVID‐19 interconnectedness: health inequity, the climate crisis, and collective trauma

Family Process

The COVID‐19 pandemic brings to the forefront the complex interconnected dilemmas of globalization, health equity, economic security, environmental justice, and collective trauma, severely impacting the marginalized and people of color in the United States. This lack of access to and the quality of healthcare, affordable housing, and lack of financial resources also continue to have a more significant impact on documented and undocumented immigrants. This paper aims at examining these critical issues and developing a framework for family therapists to address these challenges by focusing on four interrelated dimensions: cultural values, social determinants of health, collective trauma, and the ethical and moral responsibility of family therapists. Given the fact that family therapists may unwittingly function as the best ally of an economic and political system that perpetuates institutionalized racism and class discrimination, we need to utilize a set of principles, values, and practices that are not just palliative or after the fact but bring forth into the psychotherapeutic and policy work a politics of care. Therefore, a strong call to promote and advocate for the broader continuum of health and critical thinking preparing professionals to meet the challenges of health equity, as well as economic and environmental justice, is needed. The issues discussed in this paper are specific to the United States despite their relevance to family therapy as a field. We are mindful not to generalize the United States' reality to the rest of the world, recognizing that issues discussed in this paper could potentially contribute to international discourse.

Last updated on hub: 14 October 2020

COVID-19 mortality and long-term care: a UK comparison

International Long-term Care Policy Network

This article reviews the path of the COVID-19 pandemic across the UK long-term care (LTC) sector, indicating how it evolved in each of the four home nations. It prefaces this with a description of LTC across the UK, its history and the difficulties encountered in establishing a satisfactory policy for the care of frail older people across the home nations. The analysis indicates that throughout the pandemic, 54,510 COVID-19 related deaths were registered in the UK, across all age groups and all locations of death. Of these, 17,127 (31%) occurred within care homes and at least 21,775 (40%) were accounted for by care home residents. In terms of excess deaths (measured against the average weekly deaths during the previous 5-year period) during the pandemic England had a 38% increase in mortality compared with 29% in Scotland, 22% in Wales, and 20% in Northern Ireland. England is the only UK nation that has released COVID-19 mortality data on those receiving care at home. That data show that throughout the pandemic period there were a large number of excess deaths in the domiciliary setting. The majority of which were not recorded as being COVID-19 related. Overall, the English data demonstrate that, compared to care homes, the overall proportional increase in deaths was greater in the domiciliary setting.

Last updated on hub: 10 September 2020

COVID-19 Nursing Homes Expert Panel: examination of measures to 2021: report to the Minister for Health

Department of Health (Ireland)

This report provides a summary of the work conducted by the Nursing Homes Expert Panel, looking at the effectiveness and appropriateness of both national and international protective public health and other measures adopted to safeguard residents in nursing homes, in light of COVID-19. The evidence-informed and consultative approach taken by the Panel is described in Chapter 2. Chapter 3 presents an overview of relevant epidemiological information and data. Chapter 4 presents a summary and the results of a systematic evidence review completed under the direction of the Panel. Chapter 5 gives an overview of the results of a three-part consultation process conducted by the Expert Panel. Chapter 6 sets out the views and considerations of the Panel in respect of healthcare policy for older persons, and finally, Chapter 7 sets out the in-depth discussion on learning and the recommendations of the Panel. These address a number of thematic areas, including: public health measures; infection prevention and control; outbreak management; future admissions to nursing homes; nursing home management; . data analysis; community support teams; clinical – general practitioner lead roles on community support teams and in nursing homes; nursing home staffing/workforce; education-discipline-specific and inter-disciplinary; palliative care; visitors to nursing homes; and communication.

Last updated on hub: 07 September 2020

COVID-19 outbreak: organisation of a geriatric assessment and coordination unit. A French example

Age and Ageing

Older people are particularly affected by the COVID-19 outbreak because of their vulnerability as well as the complexity of health organisations, particularly in the often-compartmentalised interactions between community, hospital and nursing home actors. In this endemic situation, with massive flows of patients requiring holistic management including specific and intensive care, the appropriate assessment of each patient’s level of care and the organisation of specific networks is essential. To that end, we propose here a territorial organisation of health care, favouring communication between all actors. This organisation of care is based on three key points: 1) To use the basis of territorial organisation of health by facilitating the link between hospital settings and geriatric sectors at the regional level; 2) To connect private, medico-social and hospital actors through a dedicated centralised unit for evaluation, geriatric coordination of care and decision support. A geriatrician coordinates this multidisciplinary unit. It includes an emergency room doctor, a supervisor from the medical regulation centre (Centre 15), an infectious disease physician, a medical hygienist and a palliative care specialist. 3) To organise an ad hoc follow-up channel, including the necessary resources for the different levels of care required, according to the resources of the territorial network, and the creation of a specific COVID geriatric palliative care service. This organisation meets the urgent health needs of all stakeholders, facilitating its deployment and allows the sustainable implementation of a coordinated geriatric management dynamic between the stakeholders on the territory.

Last updated on hub: 18 August 2020

COVID‐19 pandemic: applying a multisystemic lens

Family Process

The COVID‐19 pandemic has a pervasive effect on all aspects of family life. We can distinguish the collective societal and community effects of the global pandemic and the risk and disease impact for individuals and families. This paper draws on Rolland’s Family Systems‐Illness (FSI) model to describe some of the unique challenges through a multisystemic lens. Highlighting the pattern of psychosocial issues of COVID‐19 over time, discussion emphasizes the evolving interplay of larger systems public health pandemic challenges and mitigation strategies with individual and family processes. The paper addresses issues of coping with myriad Covid‐19 uncertainties in the initial crisis wave and evolving phases of the pandemic in the context of individual and family development, pre‐existing illness or disability, and racial and socio‐economic disparities. The discussion offers recommendations for timely family oriented consultation and psychoeducation, and for healthcare clinician self‐care.

Last updated on hub: 14 October 2020

Covid-19 pandemic: ethical guidance for social workers

British Association of Social Workers England

Ethical guidance for social workers from the British Association of Social Workers to respond to the specific circumstances generated by the coronavirus (COVID-19). The guidance does not supersede the BASW Code of Ethics, but aims to apply them in the circumstances generated by the COVID-19 pandemic. It covers the ethical responsibilities as members of the community and in practice. It highlights the principles of prioritising need and managing risk which are central to the response during the pandemic. Social work practitioners may face choices and decisions that go beyond the bounds of usual ethics and practices, including rationing of support and resources and more stringent prioritisation. The Guidance will be continually developed, reflecting the challenges social workers face as the pandemic develops. First version published 01 April 2020

Last updated on hub: 08 April 2020

Covid-19 pandemic: ethical guidance for social workers version 2

British Association of Social Workers England

Ethical guidance for social workers from the British Association of Social Workers to respond to the specific circumstances generated by the coronavirus (COVID-19). The guidance does not supersede the BASW Code of Ethics, but aims to apply them in the circumstances generated by the COVID-19 pandemic. It covers the ethical responsibilities as members of the community and in practice. It highlights the principles of prioritising need and managing risk which are central to the response during the pandemic. Social work practitioners may face choices and decisions that go beyond the bounds of usual ethics and practices, including rationing of support and resources and more stringent prioritisation. This guidance has been updated to reflect the changing situation of the pandemic and experiences of social workers and society over the past six months. Most of the guidance remains relevant and is untouched.

Last updated on hub: 22 December 2020

COVID-19 pandemic: workforce Implications for gerontological social work

Journal of Gerontological Social Work

The COVID-19 pandemic has been challenging for people of all ages but particularly devastating to adults 65 and older, which has highlighted the critical need for ensuring that all social workers gain the knowledge and skills necessary to work with this population. While there is a critical shortage of gerontological social workers and we must continue to increase that number, we cannot wait for this to occur. In this commentary, the authors call for infusing the current social work curricula with aging content; providing current social workers with trainings on aging practice; and all social work practitioners, faculty, and researchers to address four specific areas that have gained prominence due to the impact of COVID-19: ageism, loneliness and social isolation, technology, and interprofessional practice, in their respective areas.

Last updated on hub: 20 June 2020