COVID-19 resources

Results 431 - 440 of 1026

Webinar recording: Turn around your urgent SARs in rapid time

Social Care Institute for Excellence

SCIE has worked with Safeguarding Adult Boards (SABs) to develop and test a new model for conducting Safeguarding Adult Reviews (SARs) In-Rapid-Time.

Last updated on hub: 31 July 2020

COVID-19: In conversation with Kate Terroni

Social Care Institute for Excellence

Dr Ossie Stuart, SCIE trustee, in conversation with Kate Terroni, Chief Inspector of Adult Social Care at the Care Quality Commission

Last updated on hub: 30 July 2020

Education during the Covid-19 pandemic and transitioning back to school: experiences of the fostering sector

The Fostering Network

Findings of a rapid response survey for foster carers and fostering services across the UK to understand fostered children’s experiences of education during the pandemic. The first part of the survey covered attendance at school of fostered children, provisions children received from their educational providers, the frequency of contact from the educational provider, whether they received any equipment to support learning if necessary and the experiences of the foster carer supporting the child through these changes. The second part of the survey covered children transitioning back to school and what support was felt children would need when doing this. The evidence shows that the vast majority of children in foster care have been not attending educational settings and have received very different offers and experiences of education throughout the coronavirus pandemic. While some have thrived from more one to one support and the removal of some external pressures, others have experienced increased anxiety and other mental health problems and have been excluded before being given the chance to attend educational provisions. The experience of educating during lockdown has also brought to the fore the need for more individualised education plans for looked after children. Foster carers highlighted three forms of support they would like to see in place for the children in their care: extra tuition including one to one tuition; flexible and individualised transition arrangements; and mental health support. The report argues that the role of the foster carer in the team around the child will be more important than ever when the autumn term begins while it is also important that the child is consulted with and given the opportunity to feed into their own education plans.

Last updated on hub: 30 July 2020

The doctor will Zoom you now: getting the most out of the virtual health and care experience: insight report

National Voices

Findings of a rapid, qualitative research study designed to understand the patient experience of remote and virtual consultations. The study engaged 49 people using an online platform, with 20 additional one to one telephone interviews. Participants were also invited to attend an online workshop on the final day of the study. All participants had experienced a remote consultation during the lockdown period of the COVID-19 pandemic. The report suggests that remote consultations and the use of technology offer some great opportunities to make significant improvements to general practice, hospital outpatient and mental health appointments, but making the most of this opportunity means understanding the patient experience. For many people, remote consultations can offer a convenient option for speaking to their health care professional. They appreciate quicker and more efficient access, not having to travel, less time taken out of their day and an ability to fit the appointment in around their lives. Most people felt they received adequate care and more people than not said they would be happy with consultations being held remotely in future. However, there is no one size that fits all solution. Key to a successful shift to remote consultations will be understanding which approach is the right one based on individual need and circumstance. The report argues that a blended offer, including text, phone, video, email and in-person would provide the best solution and an opportunity to improve the quality of care. By focusing on the needs of people receiving care and using a combination of communication tools a more equal space for health care providers and patients to interact can be created.

Last updated on hub: 30 July 2020

Evaluation of the CAMHS In-Reach to Schools Pilot Programme: pilot progress and the impact of Covid 19, supplementary paper to the interim report

Welsh Government

This paper supplements the evaluation of the CAMHS In-Reach to Schools pilot, a programme that aims to build capacity (including skills, knowledge and confidence) in schools to support pupils’ mental health and well-being and improve schools’ access to specialist liaison, consultancy and advice when needed. It presents the data gathered through the second round of qualitative case-study research with a sample of school clusters, services, such as Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS), school counselling, educational psychology and voluntary sector services, working with them, and interviews and discussions with CAMHS In-Reach Practitioners. The report aims to present the position for schools and services at the approximate midpoint of the pilot programme (early spring 2020) and provides a ‘snapshot’ of the impact of Covid-19 and the lockdown upon schools, pupils and services in late April and May 2020. These latter findings are drawn from a small sample at a period in time, when schools were responding to a fast-moving and challenging situation. The report finds that there is a clear need, and strong support, for the pilot, and the impact of Covid-19 is expected to increase this need. The pilot programme allows schools to be better prepared than they would otherwise have been for the return of pupils and, to a lesser degree, staff. Nevertheless, they still want support from the pilots to help them prepare for schools increasing their operations, and the difficulties pupils and staff may experience when they return.

Last updated on hub: 30 July 2020

Delivering a recovery that works for children: full list of recommendations

The Children's Society

This briefing sets out a comprehensive set of recommendations to ensure recovery plans from Covid-19 work for all children and young people. Drawn up and endorsed by a number of leading children’s sector organisations, the recommendations support a vision that considers the needs of children, young people and their families in the round, from conception to age 25; puts their voices at the heart of the recovery process; and is committed to investing in the services and workforce that they rely on. The recommendations consider both the short and the long-term, focusing on child poverty and social security; mental health and wellbeing; early years recovery; school returns; children in care; keeping children safe; and the overarching principles for recovery.

Last updated on hub: 29 July 2020

A vision for recovery: overarching principles and actions

The Children's Society

This briefing sets out the overarching principles and actions for Covid-19 recovery focusing on children and young people. Drawn up and endorsed by a number of children’s sector organisations, the principles underpin a vision that considers the needs of children, young people and their families in the round, from conception to age 25, putting their voices at the heart of the recovery process, and renewing investment in services and workforce. The principles are: take an integrated and holistic approach; protect and promote children’s rights and entitlements; treat children, young people and their families as partners; have an explicit focus on reducing inequalities – including addressing the disproportionate impact of COVID19 on BAME groups, and on children in poverty; invest in children and young people’s futures through a comprehensive, long-term funding settlement; understand how needs have changed and respond; value and invest in the workforce; value strong relationships and take a person-centred approach to new models of service delivery.

Last updated on hub: 29 July 2020

Recovery plan: safeguarding and child protection

The Children's Society

This briefing sets out the principle concerns about the impact of COVID-19 on the safety and wellbeing of children and the ability of agencies to respond to situations where children are at risk of harm within their family unit, or from others online and in communities. It outlines short-term and long-term actions that national and/or local government should prioritise to protect children in the context of COVID-19 pandemic. There is very limited evidence on the full impact of the pandemic and lockdown on children and families but the available data and evidence from practitioners working directly with families and children highlight a number of emerging concerns, including: low visibility of children during lockdown; impact on the child protection services; lack of support for families under stress; children in domestic abuse situations; victims of child sexual abuse; child victims of criminal exploitation; children missing from home; young carers; increase in online risks; and pressures on the family justice system. To address the impact of COVID-19 on safeguarding children now and in the future the briefing recommends that the Government: ensure that all children at risk are reached with an offer of help; invest in children’s services capacity to safeguard children; ensure that all vulnerable children are supported to go back to education; put experiences of children and families at the heart of future responses; be ambitious in national policy changes.

Last updated on hub: 29 July 2020

Recovery plan: children in care and care leavers

The Children's Society

This briefing sets out key concerns about children in care and care leavers and the systems and structures that have been affected by COVID-19. It outlines the short-term and long-term actions that national and/or local government should prioritise when planning their support for children in care and care leavers in the context of COVID-19. The extent of the impact of the pandemic and ‘lockdown’ on the care system and care experienced young people is yet to be fully understood but emerging concerns include: placement breakdowns; safeguarding of children and young people in unregulated accommodation; children missing from care; impact on children and young people’s mental health; contact with families; out of area placements; care leavers; sufficiency and operational capacity. To address the impact of the pandemic on care experienced young people now and in the future, the briefing recommends that the Government: protect the rights and entitlements of care experienced young people; ensure care experienced young people can access education; support mental health and wellbeing of care experienced young people, ensuring trauma-informed approaches underpin the support children in care receive; be ambitious for, and supportive of, the needs of care leavers; put children’s interests, wishes and experiences at the heart of the Care Review, addressing early support work with families, sufficiency and commissioning of care placements, use of unregulated accommodation, trauma-informed practice, and support for social care professionals and carers.

Last updated on hub: 29 July 2020

Recovery planning for Covid-19: back to school

The Children's Society

This briefing sets out a recovery plan as children return to school following Covid-19 lockdown. It outlines a number of short, and longer term, actions that national Government, local authorities, and schools, could take to help mitigate the impact of the pandemic on children’s lives and ensure that education systems are strengthened and made more resilient for the future. Specifically, the paper focuses on children mental health and wellbeing, safeguarding aspects, learning and attainment and financial hardship and poverty. The briefing calls on the Department for Education to establish a national programme of wellbeing measurement for children and young people; and to facilitate a comprehensive and inclusive review of the impact of lockdown on education, shaped by the voices of children, parents and carers, teachers and other school staff, charities supporting children and families, unions and the Department.

Last updated on hub: 29 July 2020