COVID-19 resources

Results 491 - 500 of 1212

What elements of a systems’ approach to bereavement are most effective in times of mass bereavement? A narrative systematic review with lessons for COVID-19

Palliative Medicine

Background: The global COVID-19 pandemic has left health and social care systems facing the challenge of supporting large numbers of bereaved people in difficult and unprecedented social conditions. Previous reviews have not comprehensively synthesised the evidence on the response of health and social care systems to mass bereavement events. Aim: To synthesise the evidence regarding system-level responses to mass bereavement events, including natural and human-made disasters as well as pandemics, to inform service provision and policy during the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond. Design: A rapid systematic review was conducted, with narrative synthesis. The review protocol was registered prospectively (www.crd.york.ac.uk/prospero, CRD 42020180723). Data sources: MEDLINE, Global Health, PsycINFO and Scopus databases were searched for studies published between 2000 and 2020. Reference lists were screened for further relevant publications, and citation tracking was performed. Results: Six studies were included reporting on system responses to mass bereavement following human-made and natural disasters, involving a range of individual and group-based support initiatives. Positive impacts were reported, but study quality was generally low and reliant on data from retrospective evaluation designs. Key features of service delivery were identified: a proactive outreach approach, centrally organised but locally delivered interventions, event-specific professional competencies and an emphasis on psycho-educational content. Conclusion: Despite the limitations in the quantity and quality of the evidence base, consistent messages are identified for bereavement support provision during the pandemic. High quality primary studies are needed to ensure service improvement in the current crisis and to guide future disaster response efforts.

Last updated on hub: 02 September 2020

The National Mental Capacity Forum: Chair's annual report 2019-2020

Ministry of Justice

This is the fourth annual report of the National Mental Capacity Forum. Against the backdrop of the Covid-19 crisis, the report spans three main aspects of the Forum’s work: evaluation of the efficacy of the Forum over its first four years in changing awareness of the Mental Capacity Act (MCA) and its implementation; the legislative changes that resulted in the Mental Capacity (Amendment) Act 2019 to move from Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DoLS) to Liberty Protection Safeguards (LPS); and actions taken from the outset of the pandemic to meet the needs of those who are protected by the MCA and support those providing care and having responsibility for the wellbeing of people with impairments of mental capacity.

Last updated on hub: 01 September 2020

Personal protective equipment (PPE): care workers delivering homecare during the Covid-19 response

Healthcare Safety Investigation Branch

This national intelligence report provides insight into a current safety risk that the Healthcare Safety Investigation Branch (HSIB) has identified, relating to the use of personal protective equipment (PPE) by care workers when visiting a patient at home. It documents how concerns raised by HSIB were responded to by Public Health England, the body responsible for the development of guidelines for the appropriate use of PPE. The report finds that there are multiple Covid-19 guidelines for different care sectors. PPE guidelines should be used in conjunction with other guidelines, such as infection control guidelines, so that care providers can develop protocols for care delivery. This is challenging when guidelines are updated, or new guidelines are issued and there is a risk that guidance may be missed. The report argues that there is an opportunity to introduce a document management system for guidelines to ensure that the latest information is available. This would involve the design of a usable navigation system so that all related guidelines relevant to a particular care sector are visible and can be checked for completeness.

Last updated on hub: 01 September 2020

Telephone befriending: a valuable service during lockdown

Healthwatch Enfield

This report gives a brief overview of the telephone befriending scheme set up in the London Borough of Enfield during the Coronavirus pandemic and a snapshot of issues raised by residents identified as being vulnerable or at risk. Overall, Healthwatch Enfield volunteers made 413 telephone befriending calls during this period. The main issue raised by participants was the impact of social isolation on health and wellbeing including mental health issues, with those residents with ongoing health needs being particularly concerned. Recipients appreciated food parcels and medicines delivery but also valued the support of family and neighbours. Most of the recipients were pleased to receive the calls and a core continued to receive these throughout the period. The report suggests that the scheme should be continued if people request it, with established organisations being asked to support the calls. If or when a second wave arises, arrangements should be made to re-establish the full service.

Last updated on hub: 01 September 2020

West Midlands inquiry into COVID-19 fatalities in the BAME community

COVID-19 BAME Evidence Gathering Taskforce

Findings from the Labour Party-led COVID-19 BAME Evidence Gathering Taskforce, which was established to gather the evidence on the impact of Covid-19 on black and minority ethnic communities in the West Midlands. The report indicates that men and women in the black community have been over four times more likely to die from Covid-19 than white people (4.2 and 4.3 times respectively). Men of Bangladeshi and Pakistani origin were 3.6 times more likely to have a Covid-19 related death, while the figure for women was 3.4 times more likely. Key findings include: fear of inequitable treatment that might be received in the NHS was a deterrent for many in the BAME asking for help quickly enough; the BAME community experienced an NHS and care system that was overwhelmed, despite the heroism of our frontline NHS workers, many of whom were themselves from the BAME community; public health messages about symptoms or what to do when in need were poorly communicated to BAME communities; the voice of the BAME community has not been heard in the way the health services are designed and delivered; many BAME frontline workers had direct experience of inadequate provision of PPE with some having to make protective equipment themselves; a clear strategy for understanding the scientific evidence for the disproportionate impact of Covid-19 on the BAME community has not been communicated effectively. The report makes a number of recommendations and calls on the Government to commence a formal judge-led independent public inquiry into the Covid-19 fatalities in the BAME community and to consult with BAME communities on both the Chair and the Terms of Reference.

Last updated on hub: 01 September 2020

Vulnerable children and young people survey: summary of returns waves 1 to 8

Department for Education

Summary of a survey of local authorities in England to help understand the impact of the coronavirus (Covid-19) outbreak on children’s social care. The analysis in the survey covers: contact with children supported by the local authority children’s social care; children’s social care workforce; cost pressures; and system pressures. The analysis reveals that the majority of children looked after (CLA), children on a child protection plan (CPP) and other children in need (CIN) have had their cases reviewed in light of the Covid-19 outbreak (95%, 96% and 86% respectively); the proportion of social workers not working due to Covid-19 has reduced over the time period, with 4% of local authorities reporting over 10% of social workers unavailable due to Covid-19 in Wave 8, compared to 13% in Wave 1; around four in five local authorities have reported a rise in weekly foster and residential placements costs due to Covid-19 (82% and 83% respectively in Wave 8); the total number of referrals during Wave 8 was 12% higher than the usual number of referrals in the same period over the past three years; referrals from police, individuals and health services were higher in Wave 8 than the same week in 2018 (+24%, +20% and +6% respectively); the total number of referrals reported in Waves 1 to 8 of the survey was 82,940 – this is around 15% lower than the same period over the past three years; the total number of children who have started to be looked after reported in Waves 1 to 8 of the survey was 3,460 – this is around 33% lower than the same period over the past three years.

Last updated on hub: 01 September 2020

Vulnerable children and young people survey: summary of returns waves 1 to 4

Department for Education

Summary of a survey of local authorities in England to help understand the impact of the coronavirus (Covid-19) outbreak on children’s social care. The analysis in the survey covers: contact with children supported by the local authority children’s social care; children’s social care workforce; cost pressures; and system pressures. The analysis reveals that the majority of children looked after, children on a child protection plan and other children in need have had their cases reviewed in light of the outbreak (89%, 91% and 86% respectively); the proportion of social workers not working due to the pandemic has remained stable across the time period, with between 87% and 89% of local authorities reporting between 0 to 10% of social workers unavailable due to coronavirus; just over three quarters of local authorities have reported a rise in foster and residential placements costs due to the pandemic; in Wave 4 the average number of referrals to children’s social care services per local authority was 12% lower than the same period over the previous three years – this compares to 22% lower in Wave 3; the total number of referrals reported in Waves 1 to 4 of the survey was 41,190 – this is around 18% lower than the same period over the past three years; the total number of children who have started to be looked after reported in Waves 1 to 4 of the survey was 1,640 – this is around 34% lower than the same period over the past three years.

Last updated on hub: 01 September 2020

Children's social care: Government consultation response

Department for Education

Sets out the Government’s response to a consultation seeking views on proposed changes to the Adoption and Children (Coronavirus) (Amendment) Regulations 2020. These are intended to provide flexibilities to support the effective delivery of children’s social care services, whilst ensuring children’s safety. A majority of responses were in favour of each of the proposals to extend individual regulations on medical reports, virtual visits, and the continued suspension of the regular cycle of Ofsted inspections of children’s services providers. The majority of responses also agreed that all other temporary flexibilities introduced in April 2020 should lapse and the need to introduce additional safeguards. However, many consultees also raised concerns in the way the regulations were introduced, and many felt the regulations should not be extended and should be revoked immediately. On the basis of responses to the consultation the Government has decided to continue with plans to allow the majority of regulations to lapse on 25 September, save those specifically set out in this document, on medical assessments, virtual visits and Ofsted inspections. The Government has no plans to extend the regulations beyond March 2021.

Last updated on hub: 01 September 2020

Evaluating the importance of scale in proposals for local government reorganisation

Pricewaterhouse Coopers LLP

The purpose of this report is to consider the importance of scale in proposals for local government reorganisation. Throughout the report, the implications for the organisation and delivery of children and adults’ social care services are discussed. The report identifies considerations relating to the costs associated with disaggregation; what this might mean in terms of risk and resilience of service provision; how service performance might be impacted; what it could mean for the place agenda; and issues arising from the response to Covid-19. It also sets out the financial implications of four unitary scenarios: establishing one unitary authority in every two-tier area in England; establishing two new unitary authorities in every two-tier area in England; establishing three new unitary authorities in every two-tier area in England; and establishing two new unitary authorities and a children’s trust in every two-tier area in England.

Last updated on hub: 01 September 2020

Expanding frontiers of risk management: care safety in nursing home during COVID-19 pandemic

International Journal for Quality in Health Care

Background: Nursing homes provide long-term care and have residential-oriented hospitalizations characterized by medical, nursing, and social-care treatments for a typically geriatric population. In the current emergency phase, the problem of infections in residential structures for the elderly is taking on considerable importance in relation to the significant prevalence rates of COVID-19. Safety improvement strategies: Prevention and control measures for SARS-CoV-2 infection in nursing homes should be planned before a possible outbreak of COVID-19 occurs and should be intensified during any exacerbation of the same. Each facility should identify a properly trained contact person—also external—for the prevention and control of infections, who can refer to a multidisciplinary support committee and who is in close contact with the local health authorities. The contact person should collaborate with professionals in order to prepare a prevention and intervention plan that considers national provisions and scientific evidence, the requirements for reporting patients with symptoms compatible with COVID-19, the indications for the management of suspected, probable or confirmed cases of COVID-19. Discussion: Adequate risk management in residential structures implies the establishment of a coordination committee with dedicated staff, the implementation of a surveillance program for the rapid recognition of the outbreaks, the identification of suitable premises and equipment, the application of universal precautions, the adaptation of care plans to reduce the possibility of contagion among residents, the protection of operators and staff training initiatives.

Last updated on hub: 31 August 2020