COVID-19 resources

Results 501 - 510 of 1465

Data-informed recommendations for services providers working with vulnerable children and families during the COVID-19 pandemic

Child Abuse and Neglect

Background: The COVID-19 pandemic and associated response measures have led to unprecedented challenges for service providers working with vulnerable children and families around the world. Objective: The goal of the present study was to better understand the impact of the pandemic and associated response measures on vulnerable children and families and provide data-informed recommendations for public and private service providers working with this population. Participants and Setting: Representatives from 87 non-government organizations (NGOs) providing a variety of direct services (i.e. residential care, family preservation, foster care, etc.) to 454,637 vulnerable children and families in 43 countries completed a brief online survey. Methods: Using a mixed methods design, results examined 1) ways in which children and families have been directly impacted by COVID-19, 2) the impact of the pandemic on services provided by NGOs, 3) government responses and gaps in services for this population during the pandemic, and 4) strategies that have been effective in filling these gaps. Results: Data revealed that the pandemic and restrictive measures were associated with increased risk factors for vulnerable children and families, including not having access to vital services. The NGOs experienced government restrictions, decreased financial support, and inability to adequately provide services. Increased communication and supportive activities had a positive impact on both NGO staff and the families they serve. Conclusions: Based on the findings, ten recommendations were made for service providers working with vulnerable children and families during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Last updated on hub: 12 August 2020

Data-informed recommendations for services providers working with vulnerable children and families during the COVID-19 pandemic

Child Abuse and Neglect

Background: The COVID-19 pandemic and associated response measures have led to unprecedented challenges for service providers working with vulnerable children and families around the world. Objective: The goal of the present study was to better understand the impact of the pandemic and associated response measures on vulnerable children and families and provide data-informed recommendations for public and private service providers working with this population. Participants and Setting: Representatives from 87 non-government organizations (NGOs) providing a variety of direct services (i.e. residential care, family preservation, foster care, etc.) to 454,637 vulnerable children and families in 43 countries completed a brief online survey. Methods: Using a mixed methods design, results examined 1) ways in which children and families have been directly impacted by COVID-19, 2) the impact of the pandemic on services provided by NGOs, 3) government responses and gaps in services for this population during the pandemic, and 4) strategies that have been effective in filling these gaps. Results: Data revealed that the pandemic and restrictive measures were associated with increased risk factors for vulnerable children and families, including not having access to vital services. The NGOs experienced government restrictions, decreased financial support, and inability to adequately provide services. Increased communication and supportive activities had a positive impact on both NGO staff and the families they serve. Conclusions: Based on the findings, ten recommendations were made for service providers working with vulnerable children and families during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Last updated on hub: 21 January 2021

Dealing with COVID-19 outbreaks in long-term care homes: a protocol for room moving and cohorting

Article published in the journal Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology by Kain, D. et al, October 2020. A letter to the editor that sets out some principals of room movements in long-term care homes during the COVID-19 in the context of Canadian care homes.

Last updated on hub: 13 November 2020

Dealing with the impact of COVID-19 on your staff

Skills for Care

This webinar looks at the impact of COVID-19 on workers and draws on examples from organisations who have developed effective strategies to support their staff. It examines how organisations and staff may react to the crisis – from fear, to learning, to growth and development, and considers some of the key issues that have emerged and how best to deal with them. These include: staff worrying about the safety of their families, themselves and people they care for; staff feeling isolated; staff feeling overwhelmed with information; not being sufficiently appreciated; dealing with grief and bereavement; feeling exhausted. The webinar shares practical advice and signposts to helpful resources.

Last updated on hub: 29 June 2020

Death and grieving in a care home during the COVID-19 pandemic: a guide to supporting staff, residents and their families

South Eastern Health and Social Care Trust: Northern Ireland

This guide considers the additional pressures, fears and challenges for care home staff, residents and their families during the COVID-19 pandemic. It provides advice on how staff can support residents and their families through the changes in care required by COVID-19, and in the event of deaths, and on how managers and staff can support each other. The advice is useful for all; the contacts are specific to Northern Ireland.

Last updated on hub: 04 June 2020

Deaths involving COVID-19 in the care sector, England and Wales: deaths occurring up to 1 May 2020 and registered up to 9 May 2020

The Office for National Statistics

Provisional figures on deaths involving the coronavirus (COVID-19) within the care sector, in England and Wales. The report shows that since the beginning of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic (between the period 2 March and 1 May 2020) there were 45,899 deaths of care home residents (wherever the death occurred). COVID-19 was the leading cause of death in male care home residents and the second leading cause of death in female care home residents, after Dementia and Alzheimer disease. Between 10 April 2020 and 8 May 2020 there were 3,161 deaths of recipients of domiciliary care in England – this was 1,990 deaths higher than the three-year average (1,171 deaths).

Last updated on hub: 25 June 2020

Deaths of people identified as having learning disabilities with COVID-19 in England in the spring of 2020

Public Health England

This review analyses the available data on the deaths from COVID-19 of people identified as having learning disabilities. The review looked at: deaths from COVID-19 of people with learning disabilities; factors impacting the risk of death from COVID-19 of people with learning disabilities; deaths in care settings of people with learning disabilities. The key finding of this study was that people with learning disabilities had significantly and substantially higher death rates in the first wave of COVID19 in England than the general population. Making no allowance for the younger age and different sex ratio of people with learning disabilities, the rate of deaths notified to LeDeR in this group was 2.3 times the death rate in the general population. If this figure is adjusted to allow for the likely level of under-notification to LeDeR it was 3.5 times the general population rate. After standardisation for age and sex the rate calculated just from notifications to LeDeR was 4.1 times the general population rate. Adjusting for the likely level of under-notification it was 6.3 times the general population rate. The total number of deaths in adults with learning disabilities for the 11 weeks from 21 March to 5 June was 2.2 times the average number for the corresponding period in the 2 previous years. By contrast, the number of deaths in the general population was 1.5 times the average for the 2 previous years. Deaths with COVID-19 in adults with learning disabilities were spread more widely across the age groups than those in the general population. As in the general population, the COVID-19 death rate in people with learning disabilities was higher for men than for women. The overall increase in deaths was also greater in Asian or Asian-British, and Black or Black-British people. Residential care homes providing care for people with learning disabilities do not appear to have had the very high rates of outbreaks of COVID-19 seen in homes providing care for other groups, mainly older people. This appears to be related to their smaller number of beds.

Last updated on hub: 16 November 2020

Deaths of people with learning disabilities from COVID-19

University of Bristol

This report describes the circumstances leading to death for a representative sample of 206 adults with learning disabilities. The majority of the 206 deaths (79%, n=163) were attributable to COVID-19: 27% of the total number of COVID-19 deaths notified to the LeDeR programme from 2nd March 2020 – 9th June 2020. Forty-three (21%) of the 206 deaths were attributed to other causes and are included as a comparator group – 6% of the total deaths from other causes occurring during this period. The study finds that there is a striking difference in age at death between COVID-19 deaths in the general population compared with people with learning disabilities. In the general population of England and Wales, 47% of deaths from COVID-19 were in people aged 85 years and over. Of all deaths of people with learning disabilities from COVID-19 notified to the LeDeR programme, just 4% were aged 85 years and over. A third (35%) of those who died from COVID-19 lived in residential care homes, rising to almost half of those with Down’s syndrome. A quarter (25%) lived in supported living settings. Priority must be given to supporting measures to prevent the spread of COVID-19 in these settings. People who died from COVID-19 were more frequently reported to have respiratory conditions (72%), compared to those who died from other conditions (60%). Access to healthcare that was problematic for some people who died from COVID-19 included: the responsiveness of NHS111; access to COVID-19 tests; and access to specialist learning disability nurses. Ensuring that these services are fully accessible to people with learning disabilities, their families and paid carers would improve service provision.

Last updated on hub: 16 November 2020

Decision making in a crisis: first responses to the coronavirus pandemic

Institute for Government

This report examines the government’s initial response to the Covid-19 crisis, including the implications for the social care sector and workforce, and the decisions made in three areas: economic support, Covid-19 testing and the lockdown. It suggests that the response was hampered by the absence of a long-term strategy, lack of clarity about who was responsible for what and its poor use of evidence. The report also identifies how: the government needed to be clearer about the role of science advice and its limitations, particularly in the early stages of the crisis when it looked to its scientists to generate policy, not just advise on it; government decisions were influenced too much by concerns over NHS capacity rather than by controlling the spread of the virus; senior officials distanced themselves from the decision to reach 100,000 tests a day, and it was unclear who was responsible for different aspects of the testing regime, which made it difficult to assign responsibility for remedying gaps and failures; the government did not think about some of the most important aspects of how it would implement its policies until after it had announced them, leaving many public services, in particular schools and the police, playing catch up.

Last updated on hub: 08 September 2020

Decision-making for receiving paid home care for dementia in the time of COVID-19: a qualitative study

BMC Geriatrics

Background: The lockdown imposed in the UK on the 23rd of March and associated public health measures of social distancing are likely to have had a great impact on care provision. The aim of this study was to explore the decision-making processes of continued paid home care support for dementia in the time of COVID-19. Methods: Unpaid carers caring for a person living with dementia (PLWD) who were accessing paid home care before COVID-19 and residing in the UK were eligible to take part. Participants were interviewed over the phone and asked about their experiences of using paid home care services before and since COVID-19, and their decision-making processes of accessing paid home care since the outbreak and public health restrictions. Results: Fifteen unpaid carers, who were also accessing paid care support for the PLWD before COVID-19, were included in the analysis. Thematic analysis identified three overarching themes: (1) Risk; (2) Making difficult choices and risk management; and (3) Implications for unpaid carers. Many unpaid carers decided to discontinue paid carers entering the home due to the risk of infection, resulting in unpaid carers having to pick up the care hours to support the person living with dementia. Conclusions: This is the first study to report on the impact of COVID-19 on paid home care changes in dementia. Findings raise implications for providing better Personal Protective Equipment for paid carers, and to support unpaid carers better in their roles, with the pandemic likely to stay in place for the foreseeable future.

Last updated on hub: 13 November 2020