COVID-19 resources

Results 531 - 540 of 1429

What we need now. What matters to people for health and care, during COVID-19 and beyond: new National Voices I Statements 2020. What has to happen now: National Voices’ recommendations to health and care leaders and professionals

National Voices

This report summarises how National Voices engaged with people who have ongoing health and care needs during the first phase of the pandemic and how this engagement led to a set of ‘I’ statements that describe what people who use health and care services now expect these services to look and feel like. The statements derive from the analysis of submissions to an online platform, OurCOVIDVoices, which allowed people to share their stories, including details about the impact of COVID-19 and lockdown on their physical and mental health in general, as well as their broad concerns about money, housing and accessing food. The statements will be useful to those leading the system, as well as those designing and delivering health and care services. The statements are: 1. I am listened to and what I say is acted on; 2. I make decisions that are respected, and I have rights that are protected; 3. I am given information that is relevant to me in a way I understand; 4. I am supported to understand risks and uncertainties in my life; 5. I know how to talk to the person or team in charge of my care when I need to; 6. I know what to expect and that I am safe when I have treatment and care; 7. I am supported and kept informed while I wait for treatment and care; 8. I am not forgotten. The document identifies some concrete actions that those in charge of health and care services could take to address the needs expressed in these statements.

Last updated on hub: 06 October 2020

Adult social care: Covid-19: winter plan 2020-2021 newsletter

39 Essex Chambers

This note provides an overview of the Department of Health and Social Care (non-statutory) guidance ‘Adult social care: our COVID-19 winter plan 2020 to 2021’. It discusses the key issues for local authorities, and in particular the interplay with the wellbeing principles of the Care Act 2014, including managing a potential conflict in terms of the wellbeing of both care home residents and those in the community with care and support needs as regards prevention of C-19. It also looks at the implications of the winter plan for the right to respect for family and private life, addressing the tension between the imperative to protect the health of social care users (and the social care workforce) and the need to respect the family life and private life rights of those who might be subject to protective restrictions. Finally, it explores the impact of the winter plan on deprivation of liberty safeguards, in particular in relation to testing and 14-day isolation requirements.

Last updated on hub: 06 October 2020

Coronavirus (Covid-19): changes to the Care Act 2014

39 Essex Chambers

Discusses the Care Act easements, provided for under the Coronavirus Act 2020. This briefing examines the guidance for local authorities on when it is appropriate to use the Care Act easements, emphasises the information that should be given to those being assessed and debates what changes to safeguarding policies may occur during the relaxation period. It also analyses the relationship between the Care Act easements guidance and the hospital discharge service requirements.

Last updated on hub: 06 October 2020

COVID-19 in Japan, Part 2: the impact on social foster care leavers

Scottish Journal of Residential Child Care

The global spread of COVID-19 has greatly impacted society worldwide. People are unexpectedly finding themselves being forced to live differently than they are used to, especially those in vulnerable positions. In particular, care leavers who have left social foster care and live in the community are encountering difficult situations both financially and mentally without having parents or other family members to rely on. The results of questionnaires and interview surveys with care leavers suggest that it is necessary to expand the consultation support system for care leavers and to provide support to prevent isolation. It was also confirmed that the expansion of multiple and diverse financial support is an urgent issue.

Last updated on hub: 06 October 2020

COVID-19 in Japan, Part 1: the impact on social foster care

Scottish Journal of Residential Child Care

In Japan, the response to COVID-19 was a soft approach with no enforcement, unlike the lockdown with penalties in other countries. The government's response was to temporarily close elementary, junior high, and high schools across the country. That impacted children living with foster families, and in residential care institutions for children (RCIC). This short article reflects on foster care in Japan during COVID-19. The study uses fictional cases of foster parents and RCIC constructed for research purposes. Although the COVID-19 crisis highlighted the challenges of social care in Japan, it also presents an opportunity for social change.

Last updated on hub: 06 October 2020

Relationships and resilience in the time of the Coronavirus

Scottish Journal of Residential Child Care

Coming together as a community is an important function for members of The Why Not? Trust, a charity which supports long term connections and relationships between young people with care experience and the people who matter to them. These networks allow young people to access experiences and events which give opportunities they may not be able to access on their own. Their approach is based on a belief in being defined by relationships. The COVID-19 lockdown presented a challenge to relational engagements which are contingent upon being able to interact. Despite their fears they have managed to cope. The online world provided a way of maintaining contact and providing support with young care experienced adults. The experiences of the past few months helped the Trust better understand the causes of isolation and exclusion, but also to appreciate more than ever the value of human relationships.

Last updated on hub: 06 October 2020

The impact of COVID-19 on kinship care: evidence from the kinship care charity Grandparents Plus

Scottish Journal of Residential Child Care

The challenges faced by children in kinship care and their families have been regularly identified in research. Kinship carers look after for some of society’s most vulnerable children, usually whilst facing many adversities themselves. The COVID-19 global pandemic had a significant impact on kinship carers, placing additional stress on their already difficult situations. This article describes the work of Grandparents Plus, the leading charity for kinship care in England and Wales, to identify the impact of COVID-19 on kinship carers and ensure they continued to receive support. Data were gathered using three surveys of kinship carers in England and Wales, and through discussions with Grandparents Plus project workers and volunteers. Kinship carers reported feeling scared about catching the virus, and what would happen to the children if they fell seriously ill. They were exhausted caring for the children twenty-four hours a day without a break and they were worried about the uncertainties of living with a ‘new normal’. Grandparents Plus used this information to develop new and existing support services to meet kinship carers’ needs in the context of COVID-19. It is concluded that kinship carers need sustained support to develop resilience to protect against future unforeseen crises.

Last updated on hub: 06 October 2020

Problem posing during the COVID19 pandemic: rethinking the use of residential childcare

Scottish Journal of Residential Child Care

Starting a new residential childcare service can be a daunting task at the best of times and, it could be argued, even more daunting during the wake of a global pandemic. Located in North Ayrshire, Compass Child and Family Services is a small charity providing support to children and families. The charity’s first children’s house, named Taigh Araich (which translated from Gaelic to English means Nurture House), offered a home to its first child during March 2020. The charity utilises the Social Pedagogy perspective within its philosophy of care and is beginning to connect the perspective to the Scottish context. In this article Joe Gibb, residential service manager at Taigh Araich, provides an overview of some of the learning that has taken place during the past five months. Joe concludes by arguing that social pedagogy and the GIRFEC (Getting It Right For Every Child) national practice model in Scotland, have an excellent fit in which a new residential childcare paradigm could emerge as society begins to make sense of the new normal that awaits its citizens.

Last updated on hub: 06 October 2020

Fear, uncertainty, and relational care in the face of COVID-19

Scottish Journal of Residential Child Care

This article was first published in the April 2020 issue of CYC-online and is republished by the SJRCC and CELCIS by permission of the authors and the publishers of CYC-online. The COVID-19 pandemic is testing our resilience and our ways of living and being together. Being open about the fear this situations has caused is the first step in sorting out how to handle what is happening to us. Those caring for others have a role in holding their fear. This doesn't mean denying the threat is real but means being honest, sensitive, and transparent with ourselves and others. In this challenging time, children in care need more of us than perhaps we think it is possible to give. They don't need us to panic or give in to our own sense of overwhelm. They need us to show love and be a source of strength.

Last updated on hub: 06 October 2020

Before COVID-19: the effect of the 1918 pandemic on Scotland’s children

Scottish Journal of Residential Child Care

The erroneously named ‘Spanish Flu’ pandemic of 1918-1920 was responsible for the deaths of at least 50 million people worldwide. Its point of arrival in the UK was Glasgow, Scotland, probably brought by troops returning from the battlefields of the Great War. The first infections were in factories and a boys’ industrial school and the first recorded deaths were of eight children at the former Smyllum Orphanage in Lanark. The British Newspaper Archive is a valuable online source of reports about the pandemic from local Scottish newspapers of the time, but there is more research to be done in the National Records of Scotland and in local archives. The authors welcome advice on potential sources of the effects of the 1918 pandemic on Scottish orphanages, children’s homes and industrial schools.

Last updated on hub: 06 October 2020