COVID-19 resources

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Disabled women and Covid-19: research evidence

Women’s Budget Group

This briefing reports on analysis of a survey of 3,280 individuals, including 678 disabled people (377 women and 301 men), conducted in April 2020. The research identifies that disabled women are facing serious crises of financial support as a result of the pandemic. They are more likely to say that their household had already run out of money; and are more likely to report increased strain in home relationships, which suggests an additional domestic abuse risk when viewed in tandem with existing evidence about the higher risks disabled women face. More specifically, the analysis reveals that during lockdown six in ten disabled women are struggling to access necessities from the shops (63%), compared with 46% of non-disabled men 52% of non-disabled women. Six in ten disabled women also fear missing out on medicines, compared with 43% of non-disabled women and 37% of non-disabled men. They are also under significant financial pressure with a third of disabled women said that their household has nearly run out of money, compared with a fifth of non-disabled women and men. Over a third of disabled mothers said they were struggling to feed their children. The report sets out a number of steps relevant Government departments should take to alleviate these pressures, including improving access to support and benefits, offering more flexible care packages (portability of care packages) for disabled women trapped in social isolation and in danger from domestic abuse, and taking action to limit the spread of Covid19 in care homes, improve access to information and advice.

Last updated on hub: 15 June 2020

Discharge into care homes: designated settings

Department of Health and Social Care

This guidance is for local authorities, clinical commissioning groups, care providers and people who use these services. It sets out: advice on setting up designated settings, and information for local authorities and providers; information on discharge arrangements, and supporting individuals to ensure that their care needs and preferences are accounted for; additional advice on data collection, funding, visiting, and infection prevention and control (IPC) requirements. A designation scheme has been introduced to ensure that everyone being discharged from hospitals to care homes who is COVID-19 positive, is discharged to premises that meet a set of agreed control standards to complete the recommended 14-day isolation period. Local authorities must have access to at least one designated setting or suitable alternative premises (for example, NHS community hospital beds). [First published 16 December 2020. Last updated 25 January 2021]

Last updated on hub: 22 December 2020

Discharges from NHSScotland hospitals to care homes between 1 March and 31 May 2020

Public Health Scotland

This publication presents management information statistics on people aged 18 and over who were discharged from an NHS Scotland hospital to a care home between 1 March and 31 May 2020. The first section of this report describes the methods used to identify the 5,204 discharges of 4,807 adults to care homes and describes their characteristics and COVID-19 testing status during their hospital admission. The second section focuses on the adult care homes that individuals were discharged to. It describes laboratory-confirmed care home outbreaks of COVID-19 across Scotland where the first positive test occurred between 1 March and 21 June. It then examines associations between care home characteristics and COVID-19 outbreaks, including examining association between hospital discharge to care homes and outbreaks. The data shows that: 843 of the 1084 care homes received 5,191 discharges between 1 March and 31 May (13 of the discharges identified were to English care homes or the care home could not be identified); using laboratory confirmed cases, 348 (32%) of care homes experienced an outbreak of COVID-19; the percentage of care homes with an outbreak increased progressively with care home size; almost all outbreaks (336/348) occurred in care homes for older people; COVID-19 associated mortality was concentrated in its impact, more than half of COVID-19 deaths were in 64 homes and a quarter of all COVID-19 deaths were in just 25 homes; 13.5% of care homes with no discharges from hospital had an outbreak, compared to 38% of care homes with one or more discharges.

Last updated on hub: 29 October 2020

Disparities in the impact of COVID-19 in Black and Minority Ethnic populations: review of the evidence and recommendations for action

Independent Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies

A review of the evidence on the reasons why more people from black and ethnic minority (BME) backgrounds appear to be at greater risk of hospitalisation and deaths with COVID-19. The review suggests that the reasons are complex with interplay between socio-economic disadvantage in BME populations, high prevalence of chronic diseases and the impact of long-standing racial inequalities being key explanations. Specifically, people from disadvantaged backgrounds or deprived areas, and BME backgrounds are more likely to have shorter life expectancies as a result of their socioeconomic status; housing conditions, including overcrowding is also likely to have had an impact on vulnerability to COVID-19; ethnic minorities have been over-represented in key worker jobs with increased the risk of exposure, infection and death; racial inequalities has been a recurring theme with doctors and nurse surveys experiencing difficulty getting access to personal protection equipment; the adverse social and economic consequences of COVID-19 have been greater on ethnic minority groups. The report makes a number of recommendations to address the greater risk of adverse health outcomes in BME populations. These include recommendations with immediate impact on the course of the pandemic (to mitigate the differential risk of exposure, infection and transmission, and to inform local outbreak control strategies) and longer-term action to reduce health and employment inequalities.

Last updated on hub: 15 July 2020

Disparities in the risk and outcomes of COVID-19

Public Health England

This review looks at how different factors have affected COVID-19 risk and outcomes. The review looked at different factors including: age and sex; where people live deprivation; ethnicity; people’s occupation; and care home residence. Based on the latest surveillance data, the findings aim to provide a better understanding of the COVID-19 pandemic and help guide the future public health response to it. The largest disparity found was by age. Risk of dying among those diagnosed with COVID-19 was also higher in males than females; higher in those living in the more deprived areas than those living in the least deprived; and higher in those in Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) groups than in White ethnic groups. Compared to previous years, the study also found a particularly high increase in all cause deaths among those born outside the UK and Ireland; those in a range of caring occupations including social care and nursing auxiliaries and assistants; those who drive passengers in road vehicles for a living including taxi and minicab drivers and chauffeurs; those working as security guards and related occupations; and those in care homes. The review notes that the analyses do not take into account the existence of comorbidities, which are strongly associated with the risk of death from COVID-19.

Last updated on hub: 03 June 2020

Distance recruitment

Skills for Care

Face-to-face interviews are being replaced with video calls to maintain social distancing due to COVID-19. A candidate’s experience of the recruitment process will influence their view of the employer and interest in vacancies. This webinar provides tips on effective distance recruitment.

Last updated on hub: 29 June 2020

Distance recruitment tips: virtual interviewing

Skills for Care

Advice on distance recruitment and carrying out virtual interviews.

Last updated on hub: 18 May 2020

Doing interprofessional research in the COVID-19 era: a discussion paper

Journal of Interprofessional Care

The COVID-19 pandemic, and ensuing physical distancing measures, poses challenges for researchers in the field of interprofessional care. Pandemic management has highlighted the centrality of interprofessional working to effective healthcare delivery during crises. It is essential to find ways to maintain interprofessional research that has commenced, while also designing research to capture important learning from pandemic management and response. However, it also creates opportunities for new research projects and novel research designs. This discussion paper explores ways of adapting existing research methodologies and outlines potential avenues for new research. Specifically, considerations to bear in mind when designing interprofessional research during the pandemic include research ethics and integrity, research design, data collection methods, research opportunities, implications and limitations. Interprofessional research can continue to make a valuable contribution in informing global responses to COVID-19 and in planning for future global health crises. The authors call for, insofar as possible, for interprofessional research to continue to be developed during this time.

Last updated on hub: 31 August 2020

Doing interprofessional research in the COVID-19 era: a discussion paper

Journal of Interprofessional Care

The COVID-19 pandemic, and ensuing physical distancing measures, poses challenges for researchers in the field of interprofessional care. Pandemic management has highlighted the centrality of interprofessional working to effective healthcare delivery during crises. It is essential to find ways to maintain interprofessional research that has commenced, while also designing research to capture important learning from pandemic management and response. However, it also creates opportunities for new research projects and novel research designs. This discussion paper explores ways of adapting existing research methodologies and outlines potential avenues for new research. Specifically, considerations to bear in mind when designing interprofessional research during the pandemic include research ethics and integrity, research design, data collection methods, research opportunities, implications and limitations. Interprofessional research can continue to make a valuable contribution in informing global responses to COVID-19 and in planning for future global health crises. We call for, insofar as possible, for interprofessional research to continue to be developed during this time.

Last updated on hub: 01 November 2020

DoLS and Best Interests in response to Covid-19

National Mental Capacity Forum

This webinar explores the implications of Covid-19 and the lockdown for deprivation of liberty safeguarding and best interest decisions. It covers early issues raised with the Welsh Government; worries from those with learning difficulties; DoLS guidance; DoLS in practice; the law regarding best interests decision making; and critical care decision making and Covid-19.

Last updated on hub: 15 September 2020