COVID-19 resources

Results 581 - 590 of 750

Recovering from Covid-19: supporting children and families

County Councils Network

This short report draws on research on the funding of Children Social Care carried out by the County Councils Network, highlights some of the key findings which are likely to impact the ability of County Authorities to respond to the needs of children and families which is anticipated will arise from the Covid-19 crisis. The research found that declining funding and rising demand has meant councils have had to decrease spending on preventative services and early intervention services in order to ensure they meet their statutory duties. Local authorities have also become increasingly reliant on the Troubled Families Programme to support their preventative work with families. The report argues that as lockdown starts to lift, it is preventative services which councils will need to help support recovery in their communities. It makes recommendations to Government which include: reform of the Troubled Families programme beyond 2020/1 centred on helping families to recover from the Covid-19 emergency; and renaming the Troubled Families programme to become less stigmatising and more inclusive as the nature of the families targeted by the programme change due to the impact of Covid-19.

Last updated on hub: 01 June 2020

The Mental Capacity Act (2005) (MCA) and deprivation of liberty safeguards (DoLS) during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic: additional guidance

Department of Health and Social Care

Emergency guidance for health and social care staff in England and Wales who are caring for adults who lack the relevant mental capacity to consent to their care and treatment during the coronavirus (COVID-19) Pandemic. This document provides additional guidance to supplement 'The Mental Capacity Act (2005) (MCA) and deprivation of liberty safeguards (DoLS) during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic', which was published in April 2020. It includes guidance on: testing someone who lacks the relevant mental capacity; providing life-saving treatment to someone who lacks the capacity to consent; hospitals and care homes; and using emergency public health powers when someone who lacks relevant capacity needs to be isolated because they have symptoms and are not following public health advice. [First published 29 May 2020; last updated 7 September 2020 to include updated information about professional visits to care homes and hospitals]

Last updated on hub: 01 June 2020

Activities delivered at home by family carers to maintain cognitive function in people with dementia socially isolating during COVID-19: evidence for non-technology based activities / interventions

Centre for Evidence Based Medicine

A rapid review to identify evidence for which non-technology based activities that can be delivered at home by family carers are effective in maintaining cognitive function in people with dementia who are socially isolating during COVID-19. These interventions can include reminiscence therapy, cognitive stimulation therapy, music-based interventions, art therapy or meaningful activities. The review found very few studies where family carers were trained or supported to deliver an intervention within the home environment. However, it identified a small body of evidence to suggest that activities delivered at home by family carers may have some positive effects on cognition and mood. The evidence suggests that engaging people with dementia in activities that they find enjoyable or those that link to past work/hobbies can be helpful in giving a sense of purpose and meaning during a time of isolation. Non-technology based interventions may have some practical advantages for those currently isolating at home since they are inexpensive and do not require extensive training.

Last updated on hub: 01 June 2020

Webinar recording: Remote assessments during the COVID-19 crisis

Social Care Institute for Excellence

Alex Ruck Keene, Lorraine Currie and Chelle Farnan from the National Mental Capacity Form (NMCF) discuss how the law works in terms of remote assessment and the practicalities during COVID-19.

Last updated on hub: 01 June 2020

The COVID-19 pandemic, financial inequality and mental health

Mental Health Foundation

This briefing looks at the links between financial inequality, employment and mental health; and reviews what official figures say about the financial consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic. It draws on evidence from the “Coronavirus: Mental Health in the Pandemic” research, a UK-wide, long-term study of how the pandemic is affecting people’s mental health, highlighting people’s emotional responses to the pandemic, the key social drivers of distress, coping mechanisms and suicidal thoughts. The research is led by the Mental Health Foundation, in collaboration with the University of Cambridge, Swansea University, the University of Strathclyde and Queen’s University Belfast. The study shows that the burden of mental distress is borne disproportionately by those with less economic security. The report concludes with recommendations to UK central and national governments to protect vulnerable people’s economic security and support them in dealing with the resulting stress.

Last updated on hub: 29 May 2020

Coronavirus (Covid-19): informing DHSC of the death of a worker in social care

Department of Health and Social Care

This guidance explains how local authorities and social care providers can tell the Department of Health and Social Care about the death of an employee or volunteer in social care. There is no legal duty on employers to submit this information, but it can help to make sure the appropriate steps can be taken following the death of a care worker.

Last updated on hub: 29 May 2020

Straddling the divide: digital exclusion during COVID-19 and beyond

International Longevity Centre - UK

This commentary discusses how COVID-19 risks widening inequalities caused by digital exclusion, but can also act as a catalyst to accelerate digital inclusion efforts. It reports that around 11.9 million people in the UK currently lack the digital skills they need for everyday life, meaning a significant proportion of people self-isolating may be stuck in their homes with limited options to avoid social isolation, get essentials and stay safe. It also highlights how many innovators in business and local government have been working to support those digitally excluded during the COVID-19 pandemic. The commentary recommends that the Government set up a nationally coordinated volunteer service to teach digital skills to those most at risk of digital exclusion during the lockdown.

Last updated on hub: 29 May 2020

The practical steps local authorities are taking to support local social care providers

Association of Directors of Adult Social Services

This summary sets out some of the measures that local authorities have put in place to support care home and home care providers, ensure their stability and safeguard care and support during the COVID-19 pandemic. It focuses on the financial support and practical support being offered to social care providers.

Last updated on hub: 29 May 2020

ADASS rapid survey: how are local authorities supporting local social care providers to respond to Covid-19?

Association of Directors of Adult Social Services

The results of a rapid survey of Association of Directors of Adult Social Services (ADASS) members to gather data about the measures local authorities have put in place to support local social care providers during the COVID-19 outbreak. It found that 95% of responding local authorities are using a variety of payments in advance to support care providers. Of those local authorities that have taken action to address the temporary cost pressures facing providers, 97% have provided financial support to providers. The survey was carried out between 28th April to 1 May 2020 and received from 89% of local authorities with responsibility for Adult Social Care in England.

Last updated on hub: 29 May 2020

Summary of international policy measures to limit impact of COVID19 on people who rely on the Long-Term Care sector

London School of Economics and Political Science

This working paper provides a summary of measures to limit impact of COVID19 on people who rely on the Long-Term Care sector, compiled from contributions from members of the International Long-Term Care Policy Network. The list of measures is not exhaustive, it only contains examples of measures that have been reported or identified by contributors to the website so far.

Last updated on hub: 28 May 2020