COVID-19 resources

Results 51 - 60 of 750

COVID-19 guides for social service workers

Scottish Social Services Council

A suite of accessible, bite-size guides to support social service workers during the pandemic. They are particularly designed to support new or redeployed workers. For those who are experienced in the sector these mobile-friendly, accessible resources will help them refresh their knowledge in light of COVID-19 and share learning with newer colleagues. Themes covered include: person-centred care; working safely; the safe use of medication during the COVID-19 pandemic; coronavirus (COVID-19) and adult support and protection; guidance to help social workers respond to COVID-19; key measures for infection prevention and control; leading in crisis; recognising deterioration and supporting people with acute care needs during COVID-19; support with death, dying and bereavement during COVID-19; Domestic Abuse Awareness Raising Tool; workforce support and wellbeing during the COVID-19 pandemic; and working from home.

Last updated on hub: 18 September 2020

COVID-19 infection rises: letter to care providers from Director of Adult Social Care Delivery

Department of Health and Social Care

A letter from Stuart Miller, Director of Adult Social Care Delivery, to care providers to highlight rising infection rates and request action on testing and PPE in all care settings.

Last updated on hub: 18 September 2020

Covid-19

Camden London Borough Council

Brings together and signposts to advice and guidance relating to Covid-19 and adult social care. Topics covered include home visits and face to face contact; benefits and direct payments; hospital discharge and bereavement; domestic violence and abuse; mental capacity and mental health support.

Last updated on hub: 18 September 2020

Towards resilience: redesigning our systems for a better future

Local Trust

This report considers the role resilience – the ability of a system to withstand disruption and to recover within a reasonable time period – has played during the Covid-19 pandemic and how systems, infrastructure, and way of life can be configured to 'build back better' from the crisis. It identifies five areas of structural weakness that lack resilience and are in need of urgent attention: poorly performing economy; disconnected decision-making; social fragility, including fragility of the social care sector; labour market precarity; and environmental vulnerability. Taking these areas of structural weakness into account, the report suggests how best to conceive an approach to building a resilient Britain, based on five domains: economic resilience – supply chains, food security, energy; public sector resilience – pubic services, government structures; community resilience – community groups, voluntary sector organisations; environmental resilience – climate change prevention and mitigation, environmental regulation; and workforce resilience – skills, precarity, labour market change and conditions.

Last updated on hub: 17 September 2020

Taking extra care in lockdown: Ty Llwynderw Extra Care & Care and Cae’r Ysgol Independent Living bungalows, Maesteg

Housing LIN

This case study features Linc Cymru Housing Association’s development in Maesteg, Wales. It provides some context on why and how the scheme came about, reflects on its’ design and also captures how the scheme has coped under lockdown, successfully ensuring a Covid-free home to date. Flexing the design to respond to Coronavirus have in the main ensured that they functioned and adapted well for both the Maesteg and Tondu schemes. Operationally, staff were able to make changes so as to be able to use the building to best effect during the intense Covid-19 lockdown.

Last updated on hub: 17 September 2020

Cohorting, zoning and isolation practice: commissioning for resilient care home provision: a report to the Social Care Sector COVID-19 Task Force

Care England

Guidance on developing good practice in cohorting, zoning and isolation practice in care home settings as a means of ensuring the effective implementation of the Public Health England (PHE) national guidance and high standards of infection prevention and control. Various examples and documents already exist which exemplify notable practice and provide national guidance. This document brings some of this together to address particular questions for the Task Force. As well as providing advice to the Task Force, it might also act as a checklist for commissioners to assess what they have already done / might do. It is split as follows: context; some key principles to guide work in this area; describing good practice in cohorting – within existing provision, or in dedicated facilities; what this means for commissioners and how they work with care providers recognising the critical relationships between them; resource considerations; and practice examples and references.

Last updated on hub: 17 September 2020

Care home infection control top tips

North West Association of Directors of Adult Social Services

The purpose of this guide is to highlight some of the ways in which residential and nursing homes have responded to the Covid-19 pandemic in order to ensure that residents are safe, needs continue to be met and wellbeing is promoted, in what are very challenging and difficult circumstances. This guide has been compiled from desktop review of policy and best practice guidance, together with interviews with a selection of providers and commissioners from across the North West region. It aims to stimulate ideas on how providers and commissioners can develop and enhance services in the context of Covid-19, whilst simultaneously building future resilience into providers existing infection control plans. Topics covered include: the physical environment; staff; wellbeing; processes; and technology.

Last updated on hub: 17 September 2020

Next steps for funding mental healthcare in England: prevention

Royal College of Psychiatrists

Focusing on prevention, this paper considers the next steps for funding mental healthcare in England. It is the second in a series covering four areas that must be fully and sustainably resourced if there is to be the progress in the access to and quality of mental health services. These areas include infrastructure, prevention, people, and technology. The COVID-19 pandemic has demonstrated the importance of community cohesion and drawing on community resources in the widest sense and the need to promote healthy lifestyles and prevent poor mental and physical health at the earliest opportunity. The paper makes a case for an increase in the funding available to local government and the NHS to enable: local authorities to prepare and respond to increasing levels of mental distress and co-morbid physical health problems in the population due to COVID-19 and as a result of lockdown, which has caused anxiety and loneliness, amongst other issues; mental health providers to prepare for an increase in demand for NHS mental health services (both planned and unplanned) as services deliver the ambitions of the LTP while also addressing a backlog of patients; local authorities and the NHS to prepare for an increase in demand for drug and alcohol use disorder services given the way in which the pandemic has exacerbated these illnesses, and the reduced availability of some services during the peak; and local authorities and the NHS to prepare for an increase in demand for mental health social care support, given the need to discharge patients safely into the community with a package of care in place and for the impact the pandemic is having on children and young people and their families.

Last updated on hub: 17 September 2020

Reducing parental conflict in the context of Covid-19: adapting to virtual and digital provision of support

The Early Intervention Foundation

This report focuses on how Covid-19 and the lockdown have impacted on issues relating to parental conflict, and how those seeking to reduce parental conflict can adapt to the current situation using virtual and digital methods. The report presents findings from an EIF survey, conducted in June and July, which 42 local authorities and 13 intervention developers and providers used to describe how Covid-19 has impacted upon their ability to support families. It also provides a summary of 12 virtual and digital interventions available to support interparental relationships, and offer practical guidance on how to assess the impact of such interventions and how to appropriately engage parents remotely. The report finds that the vast majority of local authorities and intervention developers and providers have adapted their provision to be available virtually or digitally; most of the pre-existing virtual and digital interventions targeting interparental relationships have yet to show robust evidence that they can improve outcomes for children; and there is an opportunity to generate stronger evidence about the effectiveness of virtual and digital interventions, although this is likely to need support. The report provides practical guidance on: evaluating virtual and digital interventions targeting the interparental relationship, covering planning an impact evaluation, and selecting and using appropriate outcome measures in a virtual and digital context; engaging parents remotely, including strategies for recruiting and retaining participants in virtual and digital RPC interventions, paying special attention to the importance of the therapeutic relationship between practitioner and participant.

Last updated on hub: 17 September 2020

Women and Equalities Committee sub-inquiry: Unequal impact? Coronavirus and BAME people

Clinks

In this submission, Clinks provides the Women and Equalities Select Committee with additional evidence about the impact of Covid-19 on black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) people in the criminal justice system. The briefing highlights the lack of transparency over the number of people in prison and under probation supervision from BAME communities who have tested positive for Covid-19; the impact of the heavily restricted regimes in prison on the mental health and wellbeing of BAME prisoners; and the lack of communication from the government and prison and probation services with BAME-led voluntary organisations delivering support to BAME people in the criminal justice system. The submission makes a number of recommendations including for the statistics on infections and deaths related to Covid-19 in prison to be broken down by ethnicity and published; for BAME-led organisations to be engaged in efforts to mitigate the disproportionate impact of Covid-19, and the impact of lockdown, on BAME people in the criminal justice system; and for clear action plans to be developed in the recovery planning process for prisons and probation of how the needs of BAME groups will be identified and met.

Last updated on hub: 17 September 2020