COVID-19 resources

Results 601 - 610 of 1465

Experiences of child and adolescent to parent violence in the Covid-19 pandemic

University of Oxford

This report draws upon the findings of online surveys of 104 parents who have experiences C/APV from their child aged 10-19 years and 47 practitioners who work with families experiencing C/APV. It also draws data provided by all 43 police forces across England and Wales on total numbers of reported C/APV incidents over the one-year period from 1st April 2019 to 31st May 2020. The analysis reveals that 70% of parents reported an increase in violent episodes during lockdown; 69% of practitioners said they had seen an increase in referrals for families experiencing C/APV; 64% of practitioners identified that the severity or incidence of violence had increased; 29% of parents identified a decline in C/APV during the lockdown period which was explained by a reduction in the stresses and triggers for violence in this period. Respondents identified some lockdown-specific reasons for the increase in C/APV, which include spatial confinement and coerced proximity, changes in structure and routine, fear and anxiety and lack of access to formal and informal support. The report makes ten recommendations to services, local authorities, and government in planning a response to C/APV, including ensuring robust safeguarding measures for young people and families experiencing C/APV; planning for a rise in demand for support as lockdown lifts and schools and workplaces reopen; avoiding over-criminalisation of young people using violence; and providing safe spaces for families at crisis point and respite care for young people.

Last updated on hub: 24 August 2020

Experiences of virtual children's hearings: a rapid consultation

Centre for Excellence for Looked After Children in Scotland

Findings of a rapid consultation to identify key areas of focus for further strengthening the experience of virtual children’s hearings in Scotland. Children’s hearings are the primary forum in which issues of juvenile justice, care, and protection relating to children and young people are handled. Due to restrictions as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic, virtual hearings have taken place using video-conferencing technology. The study indicates that many of those involved felt that moving to virtual hearings was a positive step forward and offered advantages and beneficial opportunities to participants. These included a more familiar environment for young people parents and carers, reducing the time and cost of travel whilst ensuring the hearings could still go ahead, and that innovative practice had been established in trying to ensure everyone was listened to and able to take part. However, the findings also identified some aspects of virtual hearings that participants found more challenging and which impacted on their participation. These included accessing paperwork, confidential space for advocates and participants, and technological barriers. Fairness, how inclusive a virtual hearing can be, and the rights of children, were key concerns also raised for further development. The report identifies key areas of focus for continuous improvement where the experience of virtual hearings can be strengthened, including ensuring children and young people have the opportunity to speak to the panel on their own if they or the panel wish; ensuring participants are fully supported; and are given access to the paper ahead of the hearing.

Last updated on hub: 11 August 2020

Explanatory memorandum to The Adoption and Children (Coronavirus) (Amendment) Regulations 2020

Department for Education

This explanatory memorandum from the Department for Education describes the temporary changes made by the Statutory Instrument Adoption and Children (Coronavirus) (Amendment) Regulations 2020. The instrument temporarily amends 10 sets of Regulations relating to children’s social care to support services manage the coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak. The changes aim to support services to manage the increased pressure on children’s social care and staff and carer shortages who are ill with coronavirus.

Last updated on hub: 27 April 2020

Exploiting isolation: offenders and victims of online child sexual abuse during the COVID-19 pandemic

European Union Agency for Law Enforcement Cooperation

This report examines activities involving the sexual abuse and exploitation of children online and related offline crimes with a particular focus on how offenders have used their time during COVID-19 confinement to increase children’s vulnerability. The findings of this report are mainly based on contributions from Member States and Europol’s partner countries and input from a number of organisations. Key findings are: there have been significant increases in activity relating to child sexual abuse and exploitation on both the surface web and dark web during the COVID-19 lockdown period; travel restrictions and other measures during the pandemic have likely prevented offenders from travelling and so have shifted their focus to the exchange of child sexual abuse material (CSAM) online; an increase in the number of offenders exchanging CSAM online during lockdown may have an impact on and stimulate demand for this type of material online beyond the lockdown; increases in detection and reporting of CSAM on the surface web during lockdown indicate the level of re-victimisation of children through the distribution of images and videos depicting them; consistent levels of activity by offenders on the dark web during lockdown reflects the ongoing organised business model that has evolved and the level of threat that it poses to children; society, including law enforcement, needs to focus on the self-generation of CSAM to ensure that children are protected from this type of exposure to harm; the increased circulation of CSAM during the COVID-19 pandemic will also increase the need for law enforcement to identify the victims depicted in it; it is critical to continue to promote preventive and educational initiatives in a coordinated and structural manner across Europe.

Last updated on hub: 06 July 2020

Exploring the challenges faced by frontline workers in health and social care amid the COVID-19 pandemic: experiences of frontline workers in the English Midlands region, UK

Journal of Interprofessional Care

The first cases of Coronavirus (COVID-19) were reported in Wuhan, China in December 2019. Globally millions of people have been diagnosed with the virus whilst thousands have died. As the virus kept spreading health and social care frontline workers (HSCFW) were faced with difficulties when discharging their duties. This paper was set out to explore the challenges faced by different frontline workers in health and social care during the COVID-19 pandemic. The research utilized an explorative qualitative approach. A total of forty (N = 40) in-depth one-to-one semi-structured interviews were undertaken with HSCFW who included support workers (n = 15), nurses (n = 15), and managers (N = 10). Health and social care workers were drawn from domiciliary care and care homes (with and without nursing services). All the interviews were done online. The data were thematically analyzed, and the emergent themes were supported by quotes from the interviews held with participants. Following data analysis the research study found that lack of pandemic preparedness, shortage of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE), anxiety and fear amongst professionals, challenges in enforcing social distancing, challenges in fulfilling social shielding responsibility, anxiety and fear amongst residents and service users, delay in testing, evolving PPE guidance and shortage of staff were challenges faced by frontline health and social care workers during COVID-19 pandemic. The results of the current study point to a need for adequate pandemic preparedness within the health and social care sector to protect both frontline workers and the individuals they look after.

Last updated on hub: 21 August 2020

Exploring the challenges faced by frontline workers in health and social care amid the COVID-19 pandemic: experiences of frontline workers in the English Midlands region, UK

Journal of Interprofessional Care

The first cases of Coronavirus (COVID-19) were reported in Wuhan, China in December 2019. Globally millions of people have been diagnosed with the virus whilst thousands have died. As the virus kept spreading health and social care frontline workers (HSCFW) were faced with difficulties when discharging their duties. This paper was set out to explore the challenges faced by different frontline workers in health and social care during the COVID-19 pandemic. The research utilized an explorative qualitative approach. A total of forty (N = 40) in-depth one-to-one semi-structured interviews were undertaken with HSCFW who included support workers (n = 15), nurses (n = 15), and managers (N = 10). Health and social care workers were drawn from domiciliary care and care homes (with and without nursing services). All the interviews were done online. The data were thematically analyzed, and the emergent themes were supported by quotes from the interviews held with participants. Following data analysis the research study found that lack of pandemic preparedness, shortage of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE), anxiety and fear amongst professionals, challenges in enforcing social distancing, challenges in fulfilling social shielding responsibility, anxiety and fear amongst residents and service users, delay in testing, evolving PPE guidance and shortage of staff were challenges faced by frontline health and social care workers during COVID-19 pandemic. The results of the current study point to a need for adequate pandemic preparedness within the health and social care sector to protect both frontline workers and the individuals they look after.

Last updated on hub: 01 November 2020

Exploring the strength of community: how to promote wellbeing for all citizens: a discussion paper from the Centre for Welfare Reform

Centre for Welfare Reform

This discussion paper explores ways to maintain and consolidate the strength of community – as it emerged and gained traction during the coronavirus pandemic – as a long-term alternative to the broken and inefficient welfare systems we currently have in place. The Covid-19 outbreak in the UK in February 2020 triggered an accelerated movement of community resilience – the like of which has not been seen since World War 2. The paper explores the changes – some subtle and some more radical – which could help to shape a fair, equal and better society: changes to government policy; changes to systems and structures; radical change (an upside-down picture of society and the devolution of power to communities). The paper argues that there is an opportunity to make changes to a system which is no longer fit for purpose and to use resources in a far more efficient way by strengthening communities and placing power and resources into their hands. Rather than going directly to the corporate provider marketplace for solutions, there is a real opportunity for third sector and community-based organisations to offer local, creative and deeply rooted solutions by working directly alongside communities where they are based; and where strong relationships and connections exist.

Last updated on hub: 21 October 2020

Exposed, silenced, attacked: failures to protect health and essential workers during the COVID-19 pandemic

Amnesty International UK

This report makes concrete recommendations for what governments across the world need to do to comply with their human rights obligations and adequately protect the rights of health and essential workers during the COVID-19 pandemic. In the context of their occupational health and safety, health and essential workers face shortages and difficulties accessing PPE in several countries; they also experience challenges around remuneration and compensation, high workloads and associated anxiety and stress; in several countries, instead of being supported, they are facing reprisals from the state and from their employers for speaking out about their working conditions or for criticising the authorities’ response; they are subjected to social stigma and acts of violence from members of society because of the jobs they perform. The report makes a comprehensive set of recommendations to ensure health and essential workers are adequately protected during the COVID-19 pandemic. It calls on governments to ensure that employers provide all health and essential workers with adequate PPE to protect themselves during the COVID-19 pandemic, in line with international standards; recognise COVID-19 as an occupational disease; listen to and address essential workers’ safety concerns in an appropriate manner; investigate any attacks or acts of violence against health and essential workers; carry out comprehensive, effective and independent reviews regarding states’ and other actors’ preparedness for and responses to the pandemic, and provide effective and accessible remedies where there is evidence government agencies did not adequately protect human rights; and collect and publish data by occupation in order to ensure effective protection in the future.

Last updated on hub: 20 July 2020

Face-to-face DoLS assessments strongly discouraged in high-risk Covid areas

Community Care

A brief overview of current guidance relating to face-to-face Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DoLS) assessments, highlighting that practitioners should only carry out face-to-face assessments “in exceptional circumstances” in areas covered by tier 2 and 3 Covid-19 restrictions. Updated guidance also says that people without relevant capacity are unlikely to be committing offence if they breach self-isolation regulations.

Last updated on hub: 20 October 2020

Fair care work: a post Covid-19 agenda for integrated employment relations in health and social care

King's College London

This paper contributes to deliberations on fair care work, presenting policy options designed to address the challenges to employment relations in health and social care highlighted by the Covid-19 crisis. In general, the pandemic has revealed the vulnerability of many workers in modern labour markets adding weight to recent calls for action in dealing with the precarious nature of employment in the ‘Gig Economy’. The paper argues that the organisational difficulties faced in dealing with the virus have exposed a related but distinctive set of challenges for the management of health and social care workforce and maps the way forward along key dimensions of employment: migrant workers; pay determination; learning and development; and the nature and consequences of outsourcing. The paper sets out a model of fair care work based on four essential principles: integration, aligning the treatment of workers in health and social care; parity of esteem for workers employed by different types of service provider and across the occupational hierarchy; compliance to ensure the effective implementation of fair care work; and collective employee voice to guarantee employee interests are meaningfully aggregated and articulated.

Last updated on hub: 07 July 2020