COVID-19 resources

Results 611 - 620 of 1465

Family Drug and Alcohol Courts under Covid-19: a practice briefing

Centre for Justice Innovation

This briefing examines how the nine existing Family Drug and Alcohol Courts (FDACs) across England are adapting to service delivery during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. FDACs aim to provide a fairer way of running care proceedings for children at risk of significant harm due to parental drug and/ or alcohol misuse. It focuses on five key areas: Hearings, Issuing New Cases, Court Timescales, Direct Work, and Drug Testing. The briefing highlights the practical challenges facing practitioners, judges and families. It also provides examples of some of the solutions that have been developed by FDACs in response to the Covid-19 pandemic. It concludes that for many parents engaged in FDAC, the social distancing and other pressures of Covid-19 impacts their ability to achieve the changes needed for a successful outcome. Unable to access the full services and support, they are vulnerable to reverting to problematic behaviours.

Last updated on hub: 12 May 2020

Family in the age of COVID‐19

Family Process

Editorial. The coronavirus has had a profound effect on the world in a multitude of ways. By the time this appears (written in mid‐April 2020), we probably will have some better sense of its ultimate impact. This essay centres on only one meaning of its effects: How it has impacted family life. The editorial discussed both direct and indirect impacts on family life. The editorial suggests that reactions to COVID‐19 present a once in a lifetime international social experiment about family life, perhaps the most widespread social experiment of all time.

Last updated on hub: 20 June 2020

Family science in the context of the COVID‐19 pandemic: solutions and new directions

Family Process

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID‐19) pandemic has precipitated substantial global disruption and will continue to pose major challenges. In recognition of the challenges currently faced by family scientists, the authors share their perspectives about conducting family research in the context of the COVID‐19 pandemic. There are two primary issues addressed in this article. First, a range of potential solutions to challenges in research are presented, resulting from the pandemic, and strategies for preserving ongoing research efforts are discussed. This paper discusses approaches to scaling back existing protocols, share ideas for adapting lab‐based measures for online administration (e.g., using video chat platforms), and suggest strategies for addressing missing data and reduced sample size due to lower participation rates and funding restrictions. This paper also discusses the importance of measuring COVID‐19 relevant factors to use as controls or explore as moderators of primary hypotheses. Second, this paper discusses how the COVID‐19 pandemic represents a scientifically important context for understanding how families adjust and adapt to change and adversity. Increased stress precipitated by the pandemic, varying from acute stress associated with job loss to more chronic and enduring stress, will undoubtedly take a toll. This paper discusses ways that family scientists can contribute to pandemic‐related research to promote optimal family functioning and protect the health of family members.

Last updated on hub: 21 August 2020

Family violence and COVID‐19: increased vulnerability and reduced options for support

Editorial published in the International Journal of Mental Health Nursing that considers the issue of family violence during pandemics. Covers the themes of isolation and family violence; a perfect storm; COVID‐19 and coercive control; and reimagining support networks for people living with family violence during these challenging times. Citation: Usher, K. et al. (2020). Family violence and COVID‐19: Increased vulnerability and reduced options for support. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing 29(4)549-552 .

Last updated on hub: 19 October 2020

Fear, uncertainty and relational care in the face of COVID-19

Scottish Journal of Residential Child Care

This article was first published in the April 2020 issue of CYC-Online and is republished by the SJRCC and CELCIS by permission of the authors and the publishers of CYC-Online. The COVID-19 pandemic is testing our resilience and our ways of living and being together. Being open about the fear this situation has caused is the first step in sorting out how to handle what is happening to us. Those caring for others have a role in holding their fear. This doesn’t mean denying the threat is real, but means being honest, sensitive, and transparent with ourselves and others. In this challenging time, children in care need more of us than perhaps we think it is possible to give. They don’t need us to panic or give in to our own sense of overwhelm. They need us to show love and be a source of strength.

Last updated on hub: 27 November 2020

Fear, uncertainty, and relational care in the face of COVID-19

Scottish Journal of Residential Child Care

This article was first published in the April 2020 issue of CYC-online and is republished by the SJRCC and CELCIS by permission of the authors and the publishers of CYC-online. The COVID-19 pandemic is testing our resilience and our ways of living and being together. Being open about the fear this situations has caused is the first step in sorting out how to handle what is happening to us. Those caring for others have a role in holding their fear. This doesn't mean denying the threat is real but means being honest, sensitive, and transparent with ourselves and others. In this challenging time, children in care need more of us than perhaps we think it is possible to give. They don't need us to panic or give in to our own sense of overwhelm. They need us to show love and be a source of strength.

Last updated on hub: 06 October 2020

Financialization, real estate and COVID-19 in the UK

Community Development Journal

In the UK, financialization has transformed many areas of the economy, including the housing market. The deregulation of financial markets that took place from the 1980s onwards, combined with the privatization of social housing, has transformed UK real estate from an ordinary good, insulated to some extent from consumer and financial markets, into a valuable financial asset. The financialization of real estate has had a largely negative impact on the UK’s housing market, the wider economy and individual communities; wealth inequality, financial instability, gentrification and homelessness have all increased as the role of the financial sector in UK property has increased. The financial crisis only accelerated many of these trends as distressed real estate was bought up by investors in its wake, and as loose monetary policy pushed up house prices in the period after the crisis. The COVID-19 pandemic is only likely to exacerbate these issues; the UK is sleepwalking into a potential evictions crisis, and ongoing loose monetary policy is likely to prevent a significant and necessary correction in house prices over the long term.

Last updated on hub: 22 January 2021

Finding the right balance: an evidence-informed guidance document to support the re-opening of Canadian nursing homes to family caregivers and visitors during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic

Journal of the American Medical Directors Association

During the first few months of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, Canadian nursing homes implemented strict no-visitor policies to reduce the risk of introducing COVID-19 in these settings. There are now growing concerns that the risks associated with restricted access to family caregivers and visitors have started to outweigh the potential benefits associated with preventing COVID-19 infections. Many residents have sustained severe and potentially irreversible physical, functional, cognitive, and mental health declines. As Canada emerges from its first wave of the pandemic, nursing homes across the country have cautiously started to reopen these settings, yet there is broad criticism that emerging visitor policies are overly restrictive, inequitable, and potentially harmful. We reviewed the nursing home visitor policies for Canada's 10 provinces and 3 territories as well as international policies and reports on the topic to develop 10 provi-informed, data-driven, and expert-reviewed guidance for the re-opening of Canadian nursing homes to family caregivers and visitors.

Last updated on hub: 13 November 2020

Five key insights on COVID-19 and adult social care

The Health Foundation

Summarises key messages emerging from recent reports on COVID-19 and adult social care. The messages include: the impact of COVID-19 on social care has been devastating; there are multiple possible reasons for outbreaks in care homes; access to hospital and social care were reduced; central government support for social care was too slow and too narrow; the pandemic played out against a backdrop of political neglect.

Last updated on hub: 04 August 2020

Five principles for the next phase of the Covid-19 response

National Voices

This document sets out the principles that should underpin and guide the necessary shift from the acute phase of the COVID-19 pandemic into ongoing management of the problem, ensuring that the medium and long term response is transparent, accountable, and consensual. As a point of principle and accountability, decision makers must put people and their rights at the centre, engage with those citizens most affected by both the virus and lockdown restrictions and understand how lives are lived by those who have ‘underlying conditions.’ The five principles, which are endorsed by many health and social care charities in England, are: actively engage with those most impacted by the change; make everyone matter, leave no-one behind; confront inequality head-on; recognise people, not categories, by strengthening personalised care; and value health, care and support equally.

Last updated on hub: 22 June 2020