COVID-19 resources

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Resilience across the UK during the coronavirus pandemic

Mental Health Foundation

This research briefing looks at resilience – the ability to cope with the normal stress of life as well as being able to bounce back from crises – across the UK during the coronavirus pandemic. The paper explores the evidence on resilience from the ‘Coronavirus: Mental Health in the Pandemic’ study, which, since mid-March 2020, has undertaken regular, repeated surveys of more than 4,000 adults who are representative of people aged 18+ and living in the UK. The paper shows that thus far, many people in the UK have managed relatively well throughout the pandemic and looks at their ways of coping. It also examines some of the potentially harmful coping behaviours people have engaged in during the pandemic. Finally, it suggests ways that the UK Government and devolved administrations could support people’s resilience so that they can better weather the storm of the current pandemic. Key messages include: most people (64%) say they are coping well with the stress of the pandemic; of those who have experienced stress due to the pandemic, almost nine out of ten (87%) are using at least one coping strategy (going for a walk, spending time in green spaces, and staying connected with others); some people are resorting to potentially harmful ways of coping, including increased alcohol consumption, substance misuse, and over-eating, putting their mental and physical health at greater risk. While each nation has made available mental health literacy resources in response to COVID-19, this study’s findings point to where more policy and investment could be targeted to support people and communities to remain resilient in the face of local or national restrictions related to the coronavirus pandemic.

Last updated on hub: 19 October 2020

How will Brexit affect the UK’s response to coronavirus?

The Nuffield Trust

This briefing looks at how leaving the single market might affect UK health and social care services in the short term as they try to deal with coronavirus while maintaining normal services. It will also look at what difference a deal might make, and the options that the UK and the EU have. The paper makes the following key points: leaving the single market will create new and wide-ranging problems for the majority of NHS medicines and medical devices which come from or via the EU – the coronavirus wave and Brexit stockpiling both created spikes in imported supplies, and filling both requirements at once may be very difficult; export blocks on medically vital supplies by the EU were used during the first wave of coronavirus and could cover the UK after 31 December; the UK will no longer have access to the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC), which collects and shares intelligence on pandemics and other infectious disease outbreaks; based on negotiating documents, draft treaties, and briefing to date, the majority of the crucial issues for health which could have been secured in an agreement are not agreed upon by the two sides, or the outcome is uncertain – these should be given a higher priority in the context of the ongoing pandemic; several important areas for responding to coronavirus depend on cooperative practices and favourable decisions across the EU and UK, beyond simply the presence or absence of a deal; poor funding for public health and social care contributed to limitations in the UK’s capacity to address coronavirus during the first wave – leaving the single market will mean slower growth, making addressing these more difficult though the case to do so remains very strong.

Last updated on hub: 19 October 2020

Vulnerable children and young people survey: summary of returns waves 1 to 10

Department for Education

Summary of a survey of local authorities in England to help understand the impact of the Covid-19 outbreak on children’s social care. The analysis in the survey covers: contact with children supported by the local authority children’s social care; children’s social care workforce; cost pressures; and system pressures. The analysis reveals that at Wave 10, a large proportion of children looked after (CLA), children on a child protection plan (CPP) and other children in need (CIN) have been in contact with a social worker in the last four weeks (68%, 94% and 62% respectively); the proportion of social workers not working due to Covid-19 has reduced over the time period, with 2% of local authorities reporting over 10% of social workers unavailable due to Covid-19 in Wave 10, compared to 13% in Wave 1; around four in five local authorities have reported a rise in weekly foster and residential placements costs due to Covid-19 (82% and 84% respectively in Wave 90). The total number of referrals during Wave 10 was 6% lower than the usual number at that time of year; referrals from police and health services were higher in Wave 10 than the same week in 2018 (+7% and +5% respectively) while referrals from schools were 12% lower than the same week in 2018 compared to 21% lower in Wave 9; the total number of referrals reported in Waves 1 to 10 of the survey was 102,910, this is around 13% lower than the same period over the past three years; the total number of children who have started to be looked after reported in Waves 1 to 10 of the survey was 4,320 – this is around 30% lower than the same period over the past three years.

Last updated on hub: 19 October 2020

The state of health care and adult social care in England 2019/20

Care Quality Commission

This report sets out the Care Quality Commission’s (CQC’s) assessment of the state of care in England in 2019/20, focusing on quality of care before the pandemic; the impact of the coronavirus pandemic; collaboration between providers; and the challenges and opportunities ahead. The report finds that the care that people received in 2019/20 was mostly of good quality – however, while quality was largely maintained compared with the previous year, there was by and large no improvement overall. As the pandemic gathered pace, health and care staff across all roles and services showed resilience under unprecedented pressures and adapted quickly to work in different ways to keep people safe. The pandemic, however, put considerable pressure on hospitals and care homes; and it is having a disproportionate effect on some groups of people, shining a light on existing inequality in the health and social care system. The crisis has also accelerated innovation that had previously proved difficult to mainstream, such as GP practices moving rapidly to remote consultations – however, many of these innovations exclude people who do not have good digital access, and some have been rushed into place during the pandemic. The analysis also shows that the success of collaboration between providers to keep people safe was varied, often affected by the maturity of pre-existing relationships within the system. The report considers the challenges and opportunities for both the short term, in planning for the coming winter, as well as longer-term strategic planning, including tackling inequalities, a new deal for the adult social care workforce, improving access to primary care services, addressing waiting lists and backlog of urgent and elective care, and ensuring accessible and appropriate mental health provision.

Last updated on hub: 19 October 2020

How Coronavirus has affected people with learning disabilities and autistic people: easy read

Department of Health and Social Care

This report comes from the Social Care Taskforce National Advisory Group: People with Learning Disabilities and Autistic People. The group gives the Government advice about services for people with learning disabilities or autistic people. The report explains how Coronavirus is affecting people with learning disabilities and autistic people; and what the Government should do to keep people safe. This includes new ways of working; accessible information; continuing to support people; helping lonely people and those who are often are left out.

Last updated on hub: 19 October 2020

Right2visit

bemix

This website is for families or close friends having problems visiting a loved one who is autistic and/or has learning disabilities. Visits are being limited or stopped because of COVID-19.

Last updated on hub: 19 October 2020

Lockdown loneliness and anxiety across the generations

The Nuffield Trust

An examination of the impact of lockdown on emotional wellbeing and mental health, by age group, finding that young people tended to fare worse.

Last updated on hub: 19 October 2020

Mental health in the UK during the COVID-19 pandemic: cross-sectional analyses from a community cohort study

BMJ Open

Objectives Previous pandemics have resulted in significant consequences for mental health. Here, we report the mental health sequelae of the COVID-19 pandemic in a UK cohort and examine modifiable and non-modifiable explanatory factors associated with mental health outcomes. We focus on the first wave of data collection, which examined short-term consequences for mental health, as reported during the first 4–6 weeks of social distancing measures being introduced. Design Cross-sectional online survey. Setting Community cohort study. Participants N=3097 adults aged ≥18 years were recruited through a mainstream and social media campaign between 3 April 2020 and 30 April 2020. The cohort was predominantly female (n=2618); mean age 44 years; 10% (n=296) from minority ethnic groups; 50% (n=1559) described themselves as key workers and 20% (n=649) identified as having clinical risk factors putting them at increased risk of COVID-19. Main outcome measures Depression, anxiety and stress scores. Results Mean scores for depression (Embedded Image =7.69, SD=6.0), stress (Embedded Image =6.48, SD=3.3) and anxiety (Embedded Image = 6.48, SD=3.3) significantly exceeded population norms (all p<0.0001). Analysis of non-modifiable factors hypothesised to be associated with mental health outcomes indicated that being younger, female and in a recognised COVID-19 risk group were associated with increased stress, anxiety and depression, with the final multivariable models accounting for 7%–14% of variance. When adding modifiable factors, significant independent effects emerged for positive mood, perceived loneliness and worry about getting COVID-19 for all outcomes, with the final multivariable models accounting for 54%–57% of total variance. Conclusions Increased psychological morbidity was evident in this UK sample and found to be more common in younger people, women and in individuals who identified as being in recognised COVID-19 risk groups. Public health and mental health interventions able to ameliorate perceptions of risk of COVID-19, worry about COVID-19 loneliness and boost positive mood may be effective.

Last updated on hub: 15 October 2020

Our recovery plan for unpaid carers

Carers UK

This document sets out a framework for ensuring the need of carers and the people they care for are fully considered in any recovery plans in the context of the Covid-19 pandemic – whether they are by Government, the NHS, local authorities, organisations providing services to carers, businesses or employers. It focuses on the recognition of carers, equality and diversity; carers and their finances; health, wellbeing and prevention; carer identification; carers assessments as a prevention tool; services, care support and the NHS; food and hunger; investment in digital and tech; employment; and how to better support carers in the medium term.

Last updated on hub: 15 October 2020

Stories of shielding: life in the pandemic for those with health and care needs

National Voices

Brings together the voices and stories of people with long-term health conditions during COVID-19. The report is based on the submissions to the digital platform Our COVID Voices, which was created for people with health and care needs to share their experiences. The platform received 70 unfiltered views and stories from people at great risk of all the effects of the pandemic, including anxiety, uncertainty and changes to their care. But it goes much deeper, into their relationships, their jobs and dealing with the everyday aspects of life in the pandemic. This document collates quotes from these stories to provide an overview of the real-life experiences of individuals shielding.

Last updated on hub: 15 October 2020

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