COVID-19 resources

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Health-care workers’ knowledge and management skills of psychosocial and mental health needs and priorities of individuals with COVID-19

Mental Health and Social Inclusion

Purpose: The purpose of this study is to identify the knowledge and management skills of health-care workers regarding psychosocial and mental health priorities and needs of individuals with COVID-19. Design/methodology/approach: This is a cross-sectional descriptive study. The data collected conveniently from 101 health-care workers in Jordan directly managing care of individuals with COVID-19. Findings: Health-care workers have moderate-to-high level of knowledge and management skills of psychological distress related to COVID-19; means ranged from 50%–70% agreement and confidence. In general, health-care workers were able to identify mental and psychosocial health needs and priorities at a moderate level. Health-care workers knowledge had a positive and significant correlation with age (r = 0.24, p = 0.012) and years of experience (r = 0.28, p = 0.004), and a significant difference was found in their management between those who are trained on psychological first aids and those who are not (t = −3.11, p = 0.003). Practical implications: There is a need to train health-care workers to integrate psychosocial and mental health care to manage care psychological distress related to COVID-19. Originality/value: This study is emphasizing the need for mental health psychosocial support training and in integration. Health-care workers providing care to individuals with COVID-19 are not aware of mental health priorities and needs of their patients. This paper contributes to the body of knowledge adding more understanding about competencies of health-care workers providing care and their preparedness to manage care individuals with COVID-19.

Last updated on hub: 19 November 2020

Foregrounding the perspectives of mental health services users during the COVID-19 pandemic

Mental Health and Social Inclusion

Purpose: This paper aims to highlight the critical importance of the perspectives of mental health service-users during the COVID-19 pandemic. Design/methodology/approach: This viewpoint is based on a review of recent research and literature and draws on consultations with experts by experience, including the lead author. Findings: The authors argue that expertise-by-experience is critical to policy, service development and research; but there is a risk it will be neglected at a time of rapid and reactive clinical development. Research limitations/implications: Understanding and responding to the nuances of individual need can only be achieved through coproducing service strategy design, delivery and research with mental health service users. The consultation outlined in this viewpoint gives some indication of the type of valuable insights that can be gained through seeking and listening to the perspectives of experts by experience. Originality/value: The discussions revealed that experience of managing severe and complex mental health conditions can actually be advantageous when facing a crisis such as COVID-19.

Last updated on hub: 19 November 2020

Research watch: Coronavirus (COVID-19), mental health and social inclusion in the UK and Ireland

Mental Health and Social Inclusion

Purpose: This paper aims to examine recent papers on the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on mental health, including implications for some of the groups of people already less included in society. Design/methodology/approach: A search was carried out for recent papers on mental health and the COVID-19 pandemic. Findings: Two papers describe surveys of adults in the UK and Irish Republic in the first days of lockdown. Low income and loss of income were associated with anxiety and depression. These surveys could not examine distress in Black and minority ethnicities, who have higher death rates from COVID-19. Two surveys of children and young people report distress and what can help. One paper summarises a host of ways in which the pandemic may affect mental well-being in different groups, and what might help. Another calls for research to understand how to protect mental well-being in various groups. Originality/value: These five papers give a sense of the early days of the pandemic, especially in the UK. They also highlight the needs of some specific groups of people, or the need to find out more about how these groups experience the pandemic. They suggest some ways of trying to ensure that everyone has the best chance to thrive in the aftermath of the pandemic.

Last updated on hub: 19 November 2020

Social assistance institutions during the COVID-19 pandemic: experiences of Polish social workers

International Social Work

This article aims to present the results of a quantitative study (which used the Computer-Assisted Web Interview [CAWI] technique) conducted among social workers from social assistance institutions in the Wielkopolska region – the second-largest first-level administrative unit in Poland in terms of area. The aim of the research was to diagnose and describe the main changes in the functioning of institutions during the COVID-19 pandemic in Poland.

Last updated on hub: 19 November 2020

Let’s not return to business as usual: integrating environmental and social wellbeing through hybrid business models post COVID-19

International Social Work

Social workers were among many researchers urging systemic change before the COVID 19 pandemic, because the dominant socio-economic system governing society was causing environmental injustice and an ecological crisis. This is a brief introduction to hybrid businesses that provide a model to strengthen social and environmental wellbeing. It is based on data collected from the author’s PhD research project, which aims to provide guidance for environmental social work practitioners.

Last updated on hub: 19 November 2020

The role of social work in the field of education during COVID-19

International Social Work

The COVID-19 crisis has meant the suppression of face-to-face educational activity in most countries. Faced with this situation, social workers must guarantee the educational community their support, through telematic media, to ensure the social protection of all students, especially the most vulnerable.

Last updated on hub: 19 November 2020

COVID-19 and beyond: social work interventions for supporting homeless populations

International Social Work

During the COVID-19 emergency response of ‘staying the blazes home’ in Nova Scotia, Canada, frontline social workers worked tirelessly ‘out of the home’ to secure safe dwellings for those on the street, living in shelters, and/or precariously housed. When the province moves to the reopening and recovery stage, social work strategies will focus on reducing homeless people’s vulnerabilities, aiming to offer safe and dignified living.

Last updated on hub: 19 November 2020

Recasting social workers as frontline in a socially accountable COVID-19 response

International Social Work

The COVID-19 pandemic has seen the engagement of a wide range of professionals in responding to clinical, social and economic issues. While the clinical expression of the pandemic has generated strong media portrayal of physicians and nurses as frontline workers, social workers – who play a key role in helping individuals and families in crisis – have not been similarly highlighted. The pandemic within a social accountability framework highlights important roles of both public officials and civic society in containment efforts. This article recognizes social workers as important actors in their representative and supportive role for civil society during COVID-19.

Last updated on hub: 19 November 2020

Pandemic sex workers’ resilience: COVID-19 crisis met with rapid responses by sex worker communities

International Social Work

The COVID-19 pandemic has exposed the inequality of social support systems worldwide, revealing the gaps that further marginalize vulnerable people. Despite the fact that sex workers are adversely affected by the pandemic, they are excluded from government relief and protection programmes as well as health services. Sex worker communities have developed rapid response strategies to support their peers in overcoming these challenges. Sex worker organizations all over the world have been working alongside other groups and communities to advocate for income and health support for all, and an end to repressive policing and state-sanctioned violence.

Last updated on hub: 19 November 2020

COVID-19: health disparities and social determinants of health

International Social Work

Social determinants of health (SDH) describe how a person’s education, economic status, and overall environment affect their health outcomes. In the United States, a long history of resource inequities has existed, particularly for those from ethnic minority backgrounds. The following is a literature review of SDH from a historical context, current state, and through the lens of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Last updated on hub: 19 November 2020