COVID-19 resources

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Curate and connect project

The Institute for Research and Innovation in Social Services

The Curate and Connect project brings together special collections of Iriss resources based on topics at the forefront of the COVID-19 crisis. Each collection includes insights from a member of the social services workforce about the impact of COVID-19 and why this is an important topic right now. The first collection covers social isolation. New topics are planned about leadership and domestic abuse. [Resource launched 15 June 2020].

Last updated on hub: 15 June 2020

Coronavirus (COVID-19) external resources

The Institute for Research and Innovation in Social Services

This page provides Scottish, UK-wide and international resources that will support social services practitioners and employers. These resources includes guides and articles to keep you informed and help you manage through the Coronavirus crisis.

Last updated on hub: 15 June 2020

COVID-19 updates from International Association of Schools of Social Work (IASSW)

International Association of Schools of Social Work

The International Association of Schools of Social Work (IASSW) has been collecting stories of social work under COVID-19 from across the world. Includes examples of practice.

Last updated on hub: 15 June 2020

Disabled women and Covid-19: research evidence

Women’s Budget Group

This briefing reports on analysis of a survey of 3,280 individuals, including 678 disabled people (377 women and 301 men), conducted in April 2020. The research identifies that disabled women are facing serious crises of financial support as a result of the pandemic. They are more likely to say that their household had already run out of money; and are more likely to report increased strain in home relationships, which suggests an additional domestic abuse risk when viewed in tandem with existing evidence about the higher risks disabled women face. More specifically, the analysis reveals that during lockdown six in ten disabled women are struggling to access necessities from the shops (63%), compared with 46% of non-disabled men 52% of non-disabled women. Six in ten disabled women also fear missing out on medicines, compared with 43% of non-disabled women and 37% of non-disabled men. They are also under significant financial pressure with a third of disabled women said that their household has nearly run out of money, compared with a fifth of non-disabled women and men. Over a third of disabled mothers said they were struggling to feed their children. The report sets out a number of steps relevant Government departments should take to alleviate these pressures, including improving access to support and benefits, offering more flexible care packages (portability of care packages) for disabled women trapped in social isolation and in danger from domestic abuse, and taking action to limit the spread of Covid19 in care homes, improve access to information and advice.

Last updated on hub: 15 June 2020

BAME women and Covid-19: research evidence

Fawcett Society

This research looks at the implications of Covid-19 and lockdown measures on BAME women. It draws on the data from a survey of an online panel, which comprised parents with at least one child aged 11 or under, people with low income, and BAME respondents (448 BAME women and 401 BAME men, and 1,308 white women). The study reveals that concerns about debt are disproportionately high in the BAME female population; nearly a quarter of BAME mothers reported that they were struggling to feed their children (23.7%, compared to 19% of white mothers); over twice as many BAME women and men reported that they had recently lost support from the government than white women and men. BAME respondents were also more likely to say they had lost support from other people and were less likely to say that there were people outside of their household who they could rely on for help. Life satisfaction and happiness were lowest for BAME women, and anxiety was highest for all women compared to men - 65.1% BAME women and 73.8% of BAME men working outside the home reported anxiety as a result of having to go out to work during the coronavirus pandemic. The report identifies a number of action points for the government and calls for a public inquiry into the disproportionate deaths of BAME people and migrants from Covid-19.

Last updated on hub: 15 June 2020

ADASS coronavirus survey

Association of Directors of Adult Social Services

This report presents the results of a survey of the Director of Adult Social Services on the impact of Covid-19 on adult social care and councils’ response to it. It focuses in particular on the steps local authorities have taken to meet the changing social care needs in the context of the pandemic; their engagement with and support to providers; the sustainability of the care market; and the interface between the NHS and social care. Almost a quarter of all respondents said that social care need had increased, mostly as result temporary closure of services, providers’ concerns about accepting new clients and people declining services they are offered. Councils have responded to the increase in need by enhancing their information and advice offer; re-training council staff; using volunteers; increased use of digital technology and drawing capacity from other areas. The survey shows that a number of Directors believe there are insufficient primary and community services in their local areas and that around a quarter thought that more than half of care home Covid-19 infections were attributable to rapid hospital discharge (combined with a lack of PPE and testing). The report identifies four key lessons from the response to COVID-19: there has been too much emphasis on protecting the NHS at the expense of care homes; more protection for care homes was needed – including not discharging Covid-19 patients from hospital to care homes; testing before discharge and step-down facilities before care home admission; and improved supply of PPE.

Last updated on hub: 15 June 2020

Readying the NHS and adult social care in England for COVID-19

National Audit Office

This report sets out the evidence around government’s progress in preparing the NHS and social care for the COVID-19 outbreak. The report examines the facts relating to the coordination of the NHS and social care response; the change in demand for hospital care and the impact of increased bed and respiratory support capacity; the provision of adult social care and shielding for the most vulnerable; and expanding, equipping and supporting the health and adult social care workforces. Key findings include: there is concerns in parts of the social care sector that local authorities have not increased fee rates paid to care providers; while reported outbreaks of COVID-19 in care homes peaked at the start of April, it is not known how many residents have had COVID-19 or how many of those discharged from hospitals into care homes had COVID-19 at the time of discharge; about half of the 2.2 million people classed as clinically extremely vulnerable to COVID-19 have registered for support; on average, reported staff absence rates in care homes were around 10 per cent between mid-April and mid-May; from 28 April, all social care workers were eligible for tests, but the Department capped the daily amount of care home tests at 30,000; the central stockpile of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) was designed for a flu pandemic and a range of bodies across health and social care have expressed concern about PPE supply; the supply of PPE from central sources up to mid-May only met some of the modelled requirement from health and social care providers.

Last updated on hub: 15 June 2020

Rights and regulation post COVID-19

LaingBuisson

LaingBuisson in partnership with Bevan Brittan held a conversation about how we move to the next stage what rights do residents, employees, directors and companies have? This webinar looked at how we should handle the next potential wave of COVID-19 and what role Care Quality Commission (CQC) and the regulators should play. You can download the slide deck that goes with the webinar here: https://www.laingbuissonevents.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Coronavirus-Rights-and-Regulation-Webinar_FINAL.pdf [Webinar recorded 11 June 2020].

Last updated on hub: 15 June 2020

COVID-19: Can there be a new social contract? With Ade Adetosoye (Podcast)

Social Care Institute for Excellence

SCIE's Chair, Paul Burstow, is in conversation with Ade Adetosoye, Chief Executive of Bromley Council.

Last updated on hub: 15 June 2020

COVID-19: Can there be a new social contract? With Alex Fox and Sarah Pickup

Social Care Institute for Excellence

Join Alex Fox, CEO of Shared Lives Plus - and Sarah Pickup, Deputy CEO at the Local Government Association.

Last updated on hub: 15 June 2020