COVID-19 resources

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LGA/ADASS COVID-19 briefing note: financial aspects of direct payments and support for personal assistants

Local Government Association

Briefing and advice note that covers the key financial aspects of direct payments (DP) and support for personal assistants (PAs) during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. The briefing provides some headline messages for Councils to focus on that focus on finance-related issues in prioritising direct payment holders and personal assistants. The briefing also includes some good practice examples to consider and follow in relation to how local authorities are supporting people in receipt of direct payments. Examples include: mirroring the up-front payments made to other care providers, a 5-10 per cent contingency advance payment added to DP holder budgets – to cover PPE, testing of PAs, etc and pooling of self-employed PAs to deploy to support contingency arrangements. The briefing was published on 11 June 2020.

Last updated on hub: 12 June 2020

How listening to co-produced research could have saved lives – and still may

Bristol University Press

Peter Beresford, author of 'Social Policy First Hand', on why the govenrnment should be paying attention to user-led and co-produced research approaches during he COVID-19 pandemic.

Last updated on hub: 12 June 2020

Uncertainty ahead for care providers

Bevan Brittan LLP

Carlton Sadler, partner and head of the Healthcare Regulatory team at Bevan Brittan provides some key insights about the pressures on care providers during the coronavirus pandemic. The article includes comments about regulation, Mental Capacity Act, and health and safety responsibilities. [Article published 8 June 2020]

Last updated on hub: 12 June 2020

Caring safely at home

Social Care Institute for Excellence

SCIE's video-based resource designed for unpaid/informal carers. You may be caring for family members, friends or neighbours at home.

Last updated on hub: 11 June 2020

National Care Forum news

National Care Forum

The news section of the National Care Forum (NCF) website is a good source for news and examples of good practice happening in care homes in the UK as they cope with the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. For example, turning to letter writing and how to celebrate birthdays under current conditions.

Last updated on hub: 11 June 2020

The Academy of Fabulous Stuff: COVID-19 resources and innovations

Academy of Fabulous Stuff

During the COVID-19 crisis the NHS and Social Care will be at its innovative best; finding new and better ways, developing resilience, being kind and improving the patient experience. Platform for sharing lots of innovative examples of practice.

Last updated on hub: 10 June 2020

Guidance: Adult Social Care Infection Control Fund

Department of Health and Social Care

This document sets out the infection control measures that the infection control fund will support and aims to answer questions received from local government and care providers about the Fund. The main purpose of this fund is to support adult social care providers to reduce the rate of COVID-19 transmission in and between care homes. A smaller percentage of the fund can be used to support domiciliary care providers and wider workforce resilience to deal with COVID-19 infections. Information on the distribution of grant allocations to local authorities and reporting requirements are included as annexes.

Last updated on hub: 10 June 2020

The potential impact of COVID-19 on mental health outcomes and the implications for service solutions

NIHR Applied Research Collaboration (ARC) West

An evidence review of how infectious disease outbreaks which require quarantine or social isolation affect the prevalence of mental health conditions within the general population and healthcare workers, and the community and population-level approaches to prevent and address mental health conditions following such outbreaks. The review notes that all conclusions should be interpreted cautiously. However, the evidence suggests that an increase in the prevalence of mental health conditions is likely during, and immediately after, the COVID-19 outbreak. However, amongst the general population, this increase subsided after quarantine measures are lifted. Healthcare workers are at greater risk of adverse mental health outcomes, particularly those who are front-line staff. To prevent and address mental health conditions, most recommendations point towards the use of online, or remote, services and resources to support at-risk groups and the general population. A specific set of recommendations are also provided for the prevention and treatment of mental health conditions in healthcare workers.

Last updated on hub: 10 June 2020

Patients living with dementia who ‘walk with purpose or intent’ in the COVID-19 crisis

NIHR Applied Research Collaboration (ARC) West

This evidence summary looks at how to manage care home residents with dementia who ‘walk with purpose or intent’ such that infection prevention measures are not breached during an epidemic such as COVID-19. It identified clear guidance from the British Geriatric Society (BGS) on the approach of care home staff for residents with dementia who ‘walk with purpose or intent’ during the COVID 19 crisis. The guidance focuses on isolation of suspected cases and behavioural approach to ameliorating potential unsafe activities of residents. The British Psychological Society’s Faculty of the Psychology of Older People also describes primary preventative and secondary reactive behavioural approaches that can be used to care for residents during the COVID 19 outbreak.

Last updated on hub: 10 June 2020

The effect of funeral practices on bereaved friends and relatives' mental health and bereavement: implications for COVID-19

NIHR Applied Research Collaboration (ARC) West

This rapid evidence review explores the effect of funeral practices, such as including restrictions in size, on friends; and relatives' mental health and bereavement. The review found evidence regarding a relationship between mental health or bereavement outcomes and funeral attendance or participation is inconclusive. It found no systematic reviews in this area. Eleven relevant observational studies of low to moderate quality were identified and these had inconsistent findings (eight from the USA, one each from the Netherlands, Australia and Rwanda). It concludes research is needed to better understand the experiences and consequences of grief and bereavement during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Last updated on hub: 10 June 2020