COVID-19 resources

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Sharing voices in response to Covid-19

National Mental Capacity Forum

This webinar provides guidance and practical tips in relation to MCA and DoLS during Covid-19; signposts to early resources and guidance for frontline workers and carers; and provides advice on how to support the team’s wellbeing.

Last updated on hub: 15 September 2020

DoLS and Best Interests in response to Covid-19

National Mental Capacity Forum

This webinar explores the implications of Covid-19 and the lockdown for deprivation of liberty safeguarding and best interest decisions. It covers early issues raised with the Welsh Government; worries from those with learning difficulties; DoLS guidance; DoLS in practice; the law regarding best interests decision making; and critical care decision making and Covid-19.

Last updated on hub: 15 September 2020

Learning from your experience: taking stock – looking forward

National Mental Capacity Forum

This webinar looks at the challenges of implementing the Mental Capacity Act 2005 during the Covid-19 pandemic. It examines specific issues that frontline staff may face, for instance determining whether testing is a treatment, lessons learnt and examples of good practice.

Last updated on hub: 15 September 2020

Coronavirus (COVID-19): guidance for people receiving direct payments

Department of Health and Social Care

Advice for people who buy care and support through a direct payment, as well as local authorities, clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) and providers who support and deliver care via direct payments during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. It includes information on the steps people employing personal assistants, or who buy care and support via direct payments, should take; and what to do if they or their personal assistant is concerned that they may have COVID-19. It also sets out what local authorities and clinical commissioning groups should do to support people who use direct payments to ensure they can continue to maintain their care and support. The guidance is accompanied by additional guidance, mostly aimed at direct payment holders, that directly responds to questions and concerns previously raised by direct payment holders, personal assistants, and charities and organisations that support them. [Published 21 April 2020. Last updated 11 September 2020].

Last updated on hub: 15 September 2020

Care England quick links: COVID-19

Care England

On this page you can find up to date links, to relevant guidance, documents and other publications publicly available of interest to care services or providers in England.

Last updated on hub: 14 September 2020

Fixing social care: better quality services and jobs

Trades Union Congress

This report looks at how a better social care system can be built in the wake of the Covid-19 crisis. The structural problems in the sector have been thrown into sharp focus during the pandemic. At the same time, the pandemic has also shown how essential social care is to the fabric of society. The report looks at what has gone wrong in terms of funding, workforce, and provider market, calling for long-term, sustainable funding of services that provides value for money to the public purse while meeting the needs of individuals and communities; and supporting care workers through decent pay and working conditions. To achieve this, the report recommends: a new funding settlement to meet rising demand and improve pay and conditions for staff; immediate funding to fill all social care vacancies – in a time of rising unemployment, social care could provide a steady source of new decent jobs; fair pay and conditions for care workers, including a sector minimum wage of at least £10 per hour and an end to the zero-hours contracts, and poor or non-existent sick pay; a national Social Care Forum to bring together government, unions, employers, commissioners and providers to coordinate the delivery and development of services, including the negotiation of a workforce strategy; a reduced private sector role; and a universal service free at the point of use, paid for through general taxation to ensure high-quality social care can be quickly accessed by everyone who needs it, in every part of England, without any variation in cost and qualifying rules.

Last updated on hub: 14 September 2020

Acting as an attorney or deputy from a distance: COVID-19 and supporting others

Office of the Public Guardian

An overview, signposting to relevant resources and guidance, on how an attorney or deputy can continue to fulfil their role during the Covid-19 pandemic and lockdown.

Last updated on hub: 10 September 2020

Assessing the vulnerability of care-workers in England to modern slavery risks during the COVID-19 pandemic

University of Nottingham

This report sets out findings of a research project to identify the key risk factors that may increase modern slavery risk in the care sector as a result of COVID-19. Whilst the pandemic is ongoing, and the situation continues to develop, it is likely that the extent of modern slavery risk will only be fully revealed in retrospect. The report draws on the analysis of primary interviews with key stakeholders and a review of the guidance and safeguarding documentation of organisations representing care procurers and providers. identified risks can be grouped into the following categories: pre-recruitment financial risk – increased recruitment activity and rise in use of migrant labour, with risk of work-visa debt; post-recruitment financial risk – wages being withheld, especially with regard to sick pay and travel time, delays in payment through retrospective reconciliation, and increasing reliance on “pay-per-minute”; pre-recruitment operational risk – flexible employment practices in response to workforce availability, including waiving of full DBS checks, media perception of care homes discouraging potential staff, leading to labour shortages, and reliance on unregulated temporary staffing agencies; and post-recruitment operational risk – decreasing quality of working conditions, pressure for staff to live ‘locked in’ on-site, audit limitations, isolation of home carers, increased risk for BAME staff, obscured signs of exploitation and unacknowledged home care workload increases. There have, however, been some unprecedented positive impacts from COVID19, which have the potential to mitigate modern slavery risk. These include: (1) increased inter-organisational co-operation; (2) increased community-orientated care approach; (3) perceived increase in the societal value of social care.

Last updated on hub: 10 September 2020

Modern slavery risks for care-workers in England during COVID-19 pandemic

University of Nottingham

This briefing summarises findings of a research project to identify the key risk factors that may increase modern slavery risk in the care sector as a result of COVID-19. Researchers found serious potential modern slavery risks in the care sector: 1. pre-recruitment financial risk – increased recruitment activity and rise in use of migrant labour, with risk of work-visa debt; 2. post-recruitment financial risk – wages being withheld, especially with regard to sick pay and travel time; delays in payment through retrospective reconciliation, increasing reliance on “pay-per-minute”; 3. pre-recruitment operational risk – flexible employment practices in response to workforce availability, including waiving of full DBS checks, media perception of care homes discouraging potential staff, leading to labour shortages, reliance on unregulated temporary staffing agencies; 4. post-recruitment operational risk – decreasing quality of working conditions, pressure for staff to live ‘locked in’ on-site; audit limitations; isolation of home carers, increased risk for BAME staff, obscured signs of exploitation and unacknowledged home care workload increases. Some unprecedented positive impacts from COVID-19, however, have arisen, which have the potential to mitigate modern slavery risk - (1) increased interorganisational co-operation; (2) increased community-orientated care approach; (3) perceived increase in the societal value of social care.

Last updated on hub: 10 September 2020

COVID-19 mortality and long-term care: a UK comparison

International Long-term Care Policy Network

This article reviews the path of the COVID-19 pandemic across the UK long-term care (LTC) sector, indicating how it evolved in each of the four home nations. It prefaces this with a description of LTC across the UK, its history and the difficulties encountered in establishing a satisfactory policy for the care of frail older people across the home nations. The analysis indicates that throughout the pandemic, 54,510 COVID-19 related deaths were registered in the UK, across all age groups and all locations of death. Of these, 17,127 (31%) occurred within care homes and at least 21,775 (40%) were accounted for by care home residents. In terms of excess deaths (measured against the average weekly deaths during the previous 5-year period) during the pandemic England had a 38% increase in mortality compared with 29% in Scotland, 22% in Wales, and 20% in Northern Ireland. England is the only UK nation that has released COVID-19 mortality data on those receiving care at home. That data show that throughout the pandemic period there were a large number of excess deaths in the domiciliary setting. The majority of which were not recorded as being COVID-19 related. Overall, the English data demonstrate that, compared to care homes, the overall proportional increase in deaths was greater in the domiciliary setting.

Last updated on hub: 10 September 2020