COVID-19 resources

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Professional practice guidance for social work in multi-disciplinary and multi-agency contexts during Covid-19 pandemic

British Association of Social Workers England

This guidance provides a professional risk framework to prepare for safe face to face social work practice within multi-disciplinary or multi-agency contexts during the coronavirus (Covid-19). It focuses on planning for and managing risk during Covid-19, working with people and families where someone is positive for Covid-19, negative or infection status unknown. It includes details of four key enablers for effective multi-disciplinary team working during the Covid-19 pandemic: good communication; approaches to decision making and co-ordination of care; organisational support; and enabling social workers to utilise their professional specific capabilities. The guidance is transferable across multi-disciplinary and/or multi-agency contexts. Developed by the British Association for Social Workers, the guidance is based on best available evidence, latest public health guidance, practice experience and expertise.

Last updated on hub: 11 May 2020

Promising approaches revisited: effective action on loneliness in later life

Campaign to End Loneliness

Drawing on the expertise and experience of leading figures in the field, academic literature and other evidence, this report presents an update to an earlier framework for loneliness interventions published in 2015. The framework helps to make sense of the different ways we can address loneliness, and explains how these approaches fit together to create an effective community response. The guide offers examples of these approaches in action so that organisations can find inspiration from others. The new guide learns the lessons of the last five years – as well as the impact of the pandemic and how organisations tackling loneliness have adapted. Its key message is that to tackle loneliness, different types of support need to be in place. People need to have the infrastructure to engage in social life, whether that is about digital, transport or a built environment that supports social life. Finally, there are direct ways of reducing loneliness whether that is one-to-one or in groups, or psychological support. A key change to the framework is the addition of the built environment as part of the ‘gateway infrastructure’ that helps tackle loneliness, recognising the role shops, cafes and pubs play as places to meet.

Last updated on hub: 09 November 2020

Promising approaches revisited: supplementary case studies

Campaign to End Loneliness

This supplement is a companion piece to the report Promising Approaches Revisited: Effective action on loneliness in later life. That report sets out the different elements needed for effective action to reduce loneliness. These case studies show the framework in action, illustrating how each element may work in practice. They cover: connectors services, including social prescribing; direct solution including group-based interventions and one-to-one approaches; gateway infrastructure such as digital technology and the built environment; and neighbourhood approaches.

Last updated on hub: 09 November 2020

Proposal to regulate to stop movement of staff between care settings

Department of Health and Social Care

This consultation seeks views from the adult social care sector on the proposal to stop staff movement between different care settings and between health and care settings is critical to minimise the risk of infection of COVID-19. The findings of a study on the impact of coronavirus in care homes in England indicated one of the common factors in care homes with higher levels of infection among staff was the extent to which those homes employed staff who worked across multiple sites. The requirement would apply to Care Quality Commission (CQC) registered residential and nursing care home providers in England. These providers would be required not to use staff to provide nursing or personal care who are carrying on, or who have carried on within the previous 14 days, a regulated activity in another setting and/or for another health or social care provider subject to certain exceptions. The consultation closes on Wednesday 25 November 2020.

Last updated on hub: 25 November 2020

Protecting and safeguarding older people: Covid-19 information pack

Older People's Commissioner for Wales

This pack provides a range of useful information and resources about keeping older people safe in Wales – including how to identify older people who may be at risk, and contact details for key organisations that can provide crucial help and support.

Last updated on hub: 17 June 2020

Providing care and support at home to people who have had COVID-19

Social Care Institute for Excellence

Quick guide to help home care workers and personal assistants (PAs) to provide care and support to people who have left hospital after having COVID-19.

Last updated on hub: 03 November 2020

Providing person-centred support for residents living with dementia who need to be isolated in care homes during the COVID-19 crisis

Association for Dementia Studies, University of Worcester

This information sheet supports care homes catering for people living with dementia during the COVID-19 pandemic. The document covers a range of strategies to help a person living with dementia understand the COVID-19 situation; to create an inviting isolation space; to help occupy the person in an isolation space; to use the environment to encourage isolation; to meet people’s need for human contact; and to encourage a person to comply with infection control requirements. It brings together current best practice, setting out general advice only. Each resident should be assessed on an ongoing and individual basis to find the best response and the latest national sector guidance should be followed.

Last updated on hub: 24 June 2020

Psychosocial impact of COVID-19 nursing home restrictions on visitors of residents with cognitive impairment: a cross-sectional study as part of the engaging remotely in care (ERiC) project

Research published in Frontiers in Psychiatry by O'Caoimh, R. et al., October 2020. Background: COVID-19 has disproportionately affected older people. Visiting restrictions introduced since the start of the pandemic in residential care facilities (RCFs) may impact negatively on visitors including close family, friends, and guardians. This study examined the effects of COVID-19 visiting restrictions on measures of perceived loneliness, well-being, and carer quality of life (QoL) amongst visitors of residents with and without cognitive impairment (CI) in Irish RCFs. Methods: This study created a cross-sectional online survey. Loneliness was measured with the UCLA brief loneliness scale, psychological well-being with the WHO-5 Well-being Index and carer QoL with the Adult Carer QoL Questionnaire (support for caring subscale). Satisfaction with care (“increased/same” and “decreased”) was measured. A history of CI was reported by respondents. Sampling was by convenience with the link circulated through university mail lists and targeted social media accounts for 2 weeks in June 2020. Results: In all, 225 responses were included of which 202 noted whether residents had reported CI. Most of the 202 identified themselves as immediate family (91%) and as female (82%). The majority (67%) were aged between 45 and 64 years. Most (80%) reported that their resident had CI. Approximately one-third indicated reduced satisfaction (27%) or that restrictions had impaired communication with nursing home staff (38%). Median loneliness scores were 4/9, well-being scores 60/100 and carer QoL scores 10/15. Visitors of those with CI reported significantly lower well-being (p = 0.006) but no difference in loneliness (p = 0.114) or QoL (p = 0.305). Reported CI (p = 0.04) remained an independent predictors of lower WHO-5 scores, after adjusting for age, sex, RCF location, and dementia stage (advanced), satisfaction with care (reduced), and perception of staff support measured on the Adult Carer QoL Questionnaire. Conclusion: This survey suggests that many RCF visitors experienced low psychosocial and emotional well-being during the COVID-19 lockdown. Visitors of residents with CI report significantly poorer well-being as measured by the WHO-5 than those without. Additional research is required to understand the importance of disrupted caregiving roles resulting from visiting restrictions on well-being, particularly on visitors of residents with CI and how RCFs and their staff can support visitors to mitigate these.

Last updated on hub: 18 November 2020

Public health and human rights: ‘valuable people at risk’

National Mental Capacity Forum

This webinar explores what it means to get the balance right between protecting public health and respecting the human rights of vulnerable people in the context of COVID-19 pandemic.

Last updated on hub: 21 September 2020

Public mental health and wellbeing and Covid-19

Local Government Association

This briefing provides advice for Directors of Public Health about the public mental health and wellbeing issues arising from the Covid-19 outbreak. Directors of Public Health are leading the local public mental health and wellbeing response. It includes a diagram which shows potential mental health impacts of COVID-19 across the life course. It highlights potential short term (for the duration of the epidemic), medium-term (2 year) and long-term impacts, which could result in increased demand on the NHS and local government. The briefing also outlines key principles of local responses, which include; whole system approaches, with agencies working together; interventions targeting the whole population, as well as those at risk; and building on existing programmes and initiatives that promote wellbeing.

Last updated on hub: 21 May 2020