COVID-19 resources for Managers and leaders

Results 1 - 10 of 699

Order by    Date Title

ADASS home care and workforce snap survey

Association of Directors of Adult Social Services

The ADASS survey was carried out in August 2021 and was completed by 69 Director of Adult Social Services (45% of councils in England). They were asked how waiting lists, homecare hours delivered and people not getting the kind of care they would choose. The report suggests that nearly 300,000 people (294,353) are waiting for social care assessments, care and support or reviews. This figure has increased by just over a quarter (26%) over the last three months. Drilling down into the headline figure - 70,000 people are waiting for care assessments (up from 55,000 at the time of the ADASS Spring Survey 2021). 11,000 people have been waiting for more than six months (compared to 7,000 at the time of the ADASS Spring Survey). The number of hours of care that are needed locally but that there is not the capacity to deliver has doubled over the last six-month period. 13% of people are being offered care and support such as residential care that they would not have chosen, due to recruitment and retention issues. The findings point to funding pressures and delays in assessments from social workers and shows that whilst councils are delivering more care and support in people’s homes, people are waiting longer for vital care assessments and reviews. The findings also suggest that there are fundamental issues relating to hospital discharges, increasing requests for care and support, and the detrimental impact of decision-making on the lives of so many older and disabled people. The findings reaffirm and compound what was found in the earlier ADASS Activity Survey (June 2021) and Spring Survey (July 2021), which showed increasing requests to local authorities for care and support in their own homes, growing levels of unmet need, people waiting longer, and more people missing out on vital care and support.

Last updated on hub: 08 September 2021

Vulnerable children and young people survey: summary of returns waves 1 to 26

Department for Education

Findings of a survey of local authorities in England to help understand the impact of the coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak on children’s social care. Local authorities were asked to report on the following areas: contact with children supported by the local authority children’s social care; children’s social care workforce; and system pressures. Headline figures for Wave 26 of the survey are as follow. The total number of children looked after (CLA) was 2% higher than the same time in 2019-20 and the total number of children on a child protection plan (CPP) was 5% lower. A large proportion of CLA, children on a CPP and other children in need (CIN) have been in contact with a social worker in the last four weeks (66%, 94% and 60% respectively). The proportion of social workers not working due to coronavirus (COVID-19) has remained at relatively low levels with 5% of local authorities reporting over 10% of social workers unavailable due to coronavirus (COVID-19). The proportion of local authorities reporting over 10% of their residential care staff unable to work due to coronavirus (COVID19) has also remained low at 3%. Note that some local authorities have small residential care workforces and therefore a small change in the number of staff available may result in a large change in the proportion unavailable. The total number of referrals during Wave 26 was 6% lower than the usual number at that time of year. The total number of children who started to be looked after reported in waves 1 to 26 of the survey was 10,450. This is around 29% lower than the same period in 2017-20.

Last updated on hub: 18 August 2021

Adult social care monthly statistics, England: August 2021

Department of Health and Social Care

Experimental statistics on a range of topics including infection control measures, staffing levels, coronavirus (COVID-19) vaccinations and testing for COVID-19 in adult social care settings. As of 27 July 2021, the proportions who had received both doses of the COVID-19 vaccine were: 93.5% of residents and 78.0% of staff of older adult care homes; 88.5% of residents of younger adult care homes; 75.2% of staff of younger adult care homes, 64.6% of domiciliary care staff and 32.2% of staff employed in other social care settings. In the week ending 28 July 2021: 91.9% of care homes in England were able to accommodate residents receiving visitors within care homes, compared to 40.3% at the beginning of March 2021; 83.8% of care homes who had staff required to self-isolate paid those staff their full wages while self-isolating. This proportion has remained consistent since mid-December; 74.0% of care homes had no staff members working in another health or social care setting, this proportion has gradually declined from 78.2% at the end of April 2021. Between May and mid-July, the number of positive PCR and LFD tests returned among care home staff and residents gradually increased but was still substantially lower than numbers in mid-January.

Last updated on hub: 13 August 2021

Volunteering and wellbeing in the pandemic: implications for policy and practice

Wales Centre for Public Policy

This briefing summarises the findings of two studies on the contribution of volunteering to individual and community wellbeing during the pandemic: a synthesis of 50 practice-based case studies using a case study synthesis method (Taylor-Collins et al., 2021) and a rapid evidence review (Boelman, 2021). Volunteering during the pandemic has had both a positive and negative effect on individual wellbeing, for the volunteers and for the people they have helped. Volunteers generally fared better in terms of their wellbeing than those who didn’t volunteer. Positive impacts that contribute to wellbeing 2 include social connection and inclusion, personal growth, sense of purpose, and feeling appreciated. Though there is limited evidence, negative impacts on wellbeing have been found for those who had to stop volunteering (either for health and care reasons or because previous roles were no longer possible), those whose offer to volunteer was not taken up, or those in stressful and challenging frontline volunteer roles, The research found that where partnerships worked well, this made a positive difference to communities because it enabled the development of individual and community wellbeing through volunteering. These partnerships were also an example of the blending of formality and informality that took place in relation to the volunteer response. The briefing makes a number of recommendations, including ensuring volunteering becomes an important part of Wales’ wellbeing-led recovery, especially in helping reach those who have been most vulnerable to the impacts of the pandemic.

Last updated on hub: 10 August 2021

Covid-19 Insight: issue 12

Care Quality Commission

This insight report looks at data on death notifications involving COVID-19 received from individual care homes; infection prevention and control (IPC) in NHS trusts and how risks can build into a closed culture. Data on the number of death notifications involving COVID-19 of care home residents across regions of England is presented alongside government data on all COVID-19 deaths, so that people can view care home deaths against deaths in the wider community (which include deaths of care home residents) to help understand the wider impact of COVID-19 in their areas. Data is also presented on death notification of people detained under the Mental Health Act and of people in services caring for peoplewith a learning disability or autistic people. Learning from unannounced inspections within acute NHS services to monitor IPC highlighted that good IPC practices have been implemented in most trusts inspected. They have adapted existing guidance and processes to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic to ensure the safety of staff and patients. Common features of closed cultures included: incidents of abuse and restrictive practice; issues with staff competence and training; cover-up culture; lack of leadership and management oversight; poor-quality care; and poor-quality reporting.

Last updated on hub: 04 August 2021

Care homes: visiting restrictions during the Covid-19 pandemic: government response to the committee’s fifteenth report of session 2019-21

Department of Health and Social Care

This is the Government’s formal response to the recommendations made by the Joint Committee on Human Rights in its report, ‘Care Homes: Visiting restrictions during the COVID-19 pandemic’ published 05 May 2021. The Committee’s report focused on guidance to care homes in England on restricting visiting during the pandemic. The report raised concerns about the proportionality of measures set out in guidance and reiterates the Committee’s call for legislation to require individualised risk assessments to be undertaken for each resident. The Government response addresses the main concerns raised in the report. The Government response also states that it will keep under review all of its guidance for care homes during Covid-19 to ensure that it is appropriately balancing the current risk to care home residents of Covid-19 with their right to family life.

Last updated on hub: 04 August 2021

Coronavirus (COVID-19) vaccination of people working or deployed in care homes: operational guidance

Department of Health and Social Care

This guidance has been produced to help support the implementation of the Health and Social Care Act 2008 (Regulated Activities) (Amendment) (Coronavirus) Regulations 2021 (‘the regulations’). These regulations require registered persons (service providers) at all Care Quality Commission (CQC) registered care homes (which provide accommodation together with nursing or personal care) to ensure that anyone who works or volunteers in the indoor premises of that care home must demonstrate that they have been vaccinated or have an exemption. The regulations state that from 11 November 2021, anyone working or volunteering in a care home will need to be fully vaccinated against coronavirus (COVID-19), unless exempt. The guidance includes a summary of the regulations, and guidance on demonstrating evidence, medical exemptions, registered persons, for staff, local authorities, residents and relatives and friends of residents, and visiting professionals. Annex A to the guidance covers good employment practice. [First published 4 August 2021. Last updated: 3 September 2021]

Last updated on hub: 04 August 2021

The tech pandemic: the long-term impact of COVID-19 on the usage of technology in specialist housing

Appello

This report follows a series of reports produced in Summer 2020, which, following the first wave of COVID-19, looked at the initial changes in perceptions towards technology in specialist housing – i.e. any housing scheme where housing, support and sometimes care services are provided as an integrated package. Those reports identified significant changes in perceptions as specialist housing providers turned to technology to enable them to maintain services for their customers and ensure a safe living environment. This report looks to understand whether the initial novelty and appreciation for technology has waned or is this something we want to embrace as part of the future of specialist housing. Developed with the Housing Learning and Improvement Network (LIN), this report is based on research undertaken between April-May 2021, with 133 senior housing professionals representing housing association and local authorities across the UK. The report reveals that 79% of housing providers feel there has been as increase interest in technology amongst supported housing customers as a result of Covid-19; 89% of housing providers believe their frontline staff have a greater appetite for using technology due to Covid-19; 82% of housing providers believe that changes in perceptions towards technology will have a long-term influence beyond Covid-19; 62% of housing providers say their investment in technology will increase following Covid-19; 26% of housing providers think they will significantly increase their remote working for traditionally site staff, 37% will slightly increase, 24% are unsure and 13%will make no changes.

Last updated on hub: 28 July 2021

Vulnerable children and young people survey: summary of returns waves 1 to 25

Department for Education

Findings of a survey of local authorities in England to help understand the impact of the coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak on children’s social care. Local authorities were asked to report on the following areas: contact with children supported by the local authority children’s social care; children’s social care workforce; and system pressures. Headline figures for Wave 25 of the survey are as follow. The total number of children looked after (CLA) was 2% higher than the same time in 2019-20 and the total number of children on a child protection plan (CPP) was 6% lower. A large proportion of CLA, children on a CPP and other children in need (CIN) have been in contact with a social worker in the last four weeks (67%, 93% and 61% respectively). The proportion of social workers not working due to coronavirus (COVID-19) has remained low with 3% of local authorities reporting over 10% of social workers unavailable due to coronavirus (COVID-19). The proportion of local authorities reporting over 10% of their residential care staff unable to work due to coronavirus (COVID19) has also remained low at 5%. Note that some local authorities have small residential care workforces and therefore a small change in the number of staff available may result in a large change in the proportion unavailable. The total number of referrals during Wave 25 was 17% lower than the usual number at that time of year. However, as Wave 25 fell during half term for most schools and the timing of the holidays differs from year to year, this comparison should be treated with caution. The total number of children who started to be looked after reported in waves 1 to 25 of the survey was 10,020. This is around 29% lower than the same period in 2017-20.

Last updated on hub: 27 July 2021

COVID-19: preparing for the future: looking ahead to winter 2021/22 and beyond

Academy of Medical Sciences

This report sets out a number of priorities for safeguarding the health and the wellbeing of the UK population for winter 2021/22 and beyond. It outlines three key challenges that will be faced by the UK this winter and beyond: a resurgence of respiratory infectious diseases, including COVID-19, influenza and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV); wider health and wellbeing impacts of the pandemic, including long COVID, mental and physical deconditioning, and the impact of delays in diagnosis and disease management during the pandemic; continued disruption to health and social care service delivery, including managing the backlog of treatment and diagnosis, incorporating IPC measures, and the financial precariousness of social care. To address these challenges, the report proposes a series of prevention and mitigation measures: vaccination to reduce severity and incidence of disease; behavioural and environmental interventions; managing the wider health and wellbeing impacts of the pandemic; supporting health and social care settings to ensure that COVID-19 and routine care can take place in parallel.

Last updated on hub: 19 July 2021

Order by    Date Title