COVID-19 resources for Managers and leaders

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"Don't ever call us unskilled again!'': learning from the experience of support workers during Covid-19

Paradigm

This report is based on responses from the Gr8 Support Covid-19 snapshot survey which invited support workers across the country to capture their experiences, thoughts, ideas and learning during the pandemic and share these with the nation. The report captures how support workers responded during the pandemic with thoughtfulness, creativity and dedication; some key messages and 'must haves' for moving forward beyond the pandemic; the plea of support workers to be valued and recognised as essential and highly skilled members of the social care workforce, not just now but as society moves forward. Key messages in responding to the pandemic emerging from this study include: supported living settings need clear, timely guidance; coronavirus tests must be available in supported living settings; support each person out of lockdown in the way that is right for them; recognise and support the essential role of support workers at this time; recognise and support the role of families and unpaid carers; society needs to act responsibly as lockdown eases; keep building on the community spirit; and get ready for a possible second wave. More broadly, the report calls for valuing and investing in social care; supporting people to regain and experience flourishing lives; increase the pay of support workers to reflect their highly skilled, complex and diverse roles; and ensure the profile of support workers is understood and valued.

Last updated on hub: 23 September 2020

“Spend time with me”: children and young people’s experiences of COVID-19 and the justice system

Centre for Youth & Criminal Justice

This paper shares findings from research gathering the views of children and young people with experience of the justice system on COVID-19 and associated restrictions. Youth justice practitioners were also consulted, and shared practice examples as case studies. The study shows that the biggest issues facing children and young people in the justice system are isolation and lack of contact with others. Boredom, lack of activity and being stuck at home were also reported to be significant issues in complying with restrictions. This is in spite of almost all children and young people reporting they have been able to stay in touch with family and friends, and practitioners developing creative methods to sustain contact, and continue to support children, young people and their families. Particular challenges were identified with the operation of the justice system across all areas of the Whole System Approach. Some existing challenges such as delays to processes and release from custody have been exacerbated by COVID-19. A range of factors have worked in supporting children and young people: keeping in touch through creative methods; ensuring access to things to keep them occupied, practical resources and technology; working with partners; and the dedication of staff. This evidence has been used to inform the Alternative Child Rights Impact Assessment about the coronavirus, commissioned by the Children and Young People’s Commissioner Scotland.

Last updated on hub: 29 June 2020

10 leaps forward: innovation in the pandemic. What we want to keep from this experience: going ‘back to better’

London South Bank University

An analysis of the findings of an online survey asking leaders and clinicians to reflect and play back in their own words the most important transformations that have happened due to COVID-19. The findings show that in a very short time healthcare services have learned to operate as a highly performing system and made significant advances. These include: staff being properly valued and supported; using 21st century tools; working with connected, visible, engaged leaders; care basics and inefficiencies have been fixed and sorted; local health systems have joined up together to get things done; staff working together as real teams; staff have stepped up and acted with professionalism and autonomy. As a result, the healthcare system is now better placed to make decisions based on needs and think pro-actively; to make mutual decisions with patients as partners; and to work in close collaboration with its community.

Last updated on hub: 16 June 2020

590 people’s stories of leaving hospital during COVID-19

Healthwatch England

This report shines a light on people’s experiences of getting home from hospital during the pandemic. In March 2020, the Government introduced a new hospital discharge policy to help the NHS free up beds by getting people out of hospital quickly. This meant anyone who may need out-of-hospital support to help them recover would now have their needs assessed after being discharged (discharge to assess), rather than in hospital. The report drawn on a survey over 500 patients and carers and 47 in-depth interviews with health and care professionals involved in the hospital discharge process. Key findings include: 82% of respondents did not receive a follow-up visit and assessment at home and almost one in five of these reported an unmet care needs; some people felt their discharge was rushed, with around one in five feeling unprepared to leave hospital; over a third of people were not given a contact who they could get in touch with for further advice after discharge; overall patients and families were very positive about healthcare staff, praising their efforts during such a difficult time; around a third of people faced an issue with delayed COVID-19 test results. The research indicates the discharge to assess model could be beneficial for patients and staff if properly resourced and implemented. However, the high proportion of people who did not receive information about the changed process or an assessment from a health professional reveals that the approach set out in the policy remains in many places an ambition, rather than a reality. In the medium term this model also needs embedding within broader health and social care reforms.

Last updated on hub: 29 October 2020

A care-led recovery from Coronavirus: the case for investment in care as a better post-pandemic economic stimulus than investment in construction

Women’s Budget Group

This briefing sets out why much-needed investment in care would promote employment, reduce the gender employment gap and would be a first step in building a resilient, sustainable and more equal economy. It argues that the Covid-19 pandemic has catalysed a revaluation of care, health and employment structures, exposing pre-existing problems, creating an opportunity for transformative change and an economic stimulus that focuses on care. The report finds that investment in care has the potential to mitigate the worst employment effects of the Coronavirus recession. Specifically, investing in care would creates 2.7 times as many jobs as the same investment in construction – 6.3 as many for women and 10% more for men; increasing the numbers working in care to 10% of the employed population, as in Sweden and Denmark, and giving all care workers a pay rise to the real living wage would create 2 million jobs, increasing overall employment rates by 5% points and decreasing the gender employment gap by 4% points; 50% more can be recouped by the Treasury in direct and indirect tax revenue from investment in care than in construction; and investment in care is greener than in construction, producing 30% less greenhouse gas emissions – a care-led recovery is a green led recovery.

Last updated on hub: 30 September 2020

A catalyst for change: what COVID-19 has taught us about the future of local government

Nesta

This paper draws together insights from the experiences of local authorities in England, Wales and Scotland during the first six months of the COVID-19 crisis, providing an overview of their response, and of the changes needed to meet the demands of the pandemic. It discusses the upcoming challenges that could hamper the efforts of councils to embed and build upon these positive changes and set a positive vision for the future of local government in the aftermath of this crisis. This vision illustrates what local government could look like in ten years if it is able to preserve and build upon the progress made during the pandemic. The paper identifies several trends that are of particular significance to local government over the coming years: remote working will be retained by a large proportion of staff, including frontline staff; digital tools will enable a large proportion of council-run services to be delivered remotely; increased and enhanced public participation and engagement will lead to improved decision-making and better outcomes for communities; sharing power with local communities across design, delivery and ownership of services and assets will enhance their quality and produce wider benefits to communities in the form of empowerment, resilience and cohesion; greater and new types of collaboration between councils, statutory partners, the third and private sectors and communities will achieve better outcomes for their people and places; and greater devolution from central government will provide local areas with longer-term funding commitments and greater flexibility to design policy for their local context. This guide is part of the New Operating Models Handbook, a set of learning products which explore the new operating models emerging in local government, supporting innovation and asset-based practice.

Last updated on hub: 07 October 2020

A child-centred recovery

Local Government Association

This document outlines ambitions for a child-centred post-Covid recovery, drawing together every aspect of policy and service delivery to create the places people want to live in and plan for the future. It outlines the immediate challenges as a result of the pandemic and what we need to do to tackle them; consider how councils and the Government can implement more child-centred approaches to policy and decision-making, to make sure that children are at the heart; and looks at the challenges we face in the longer-term to deliver the great places to grow up that children need and deserve. The report identifies three immediate priorities: a cross-Whitehall strategy that puts children and young people at the heart of recovery; investment in local safety nets and the universal and early help services, including mental health and wellbeing services, that children, young people and their families will need to support them through the short and long-term impacts of the pandemic; dedicated action to prevent the attainment gap from widening, including immediate work to stabilise the early years sector and support children and young people to attend school or to continue learning from home where required. The report argues that a child-centred recovery is about far more than services directly responsible for children and young people. Children deserve to grow up in good quality, stable homes, in safe areas offering positive long-term opportunities, with good access to the services they need.

Last updated on hub: 27 October 2020

A critical juncture for public services: lessons from COVID-19

House of Lords

The COVID-19 pandemic represented an unprecedented challenge to the United Kingdom’s public services. This report describes how service providers responded, discusses lessons to be learned from the pandemic and recommends a number of principles to transform public service delivery. Many public service providers developed remarkable innovations to meet the challenge of COVID-19. Decisions which before the pandemic took months were made in minutes. Good personal and organisational relationships broke down longstanding barriers between the statutory and voluntary sectors. New ways to deliver services flourished. Digital technology was used more widely, and more successfully, than ever before. But the Committee also heard that the United Kingdom’s public services had entered the COVID-19 pandemic with low levels of resilience. The virus further disadvantaged many who were already left behind. Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic and Gypsy, Roma and Traveller people suffered disproportionately, the result of historical underfunding of preventative health services. Disadvantaged children fared worse during the pandemic, too; the educational attainment gap between the poorest children and their counterparts grew wider. The overall public health response was at times hampered by over-centralised, poorly coordinated and poorly communicated policies that were designed and delivered by central Government, even though local-level providers were often better equipped. This report makes recommendations for how public services can hold on to the advances that they achieved during the pandemic, setting out several principles, which include: focusing on preventative services to reduce inequalities; better collaboration between central government and local services; recognising charities, community groups, volunteers and the private sector as key public service providers; greater data sharing, access to digital technology and integration; and user involvement in the design and delivery of public services.

Last updated on hub: 16 November 2020

A data linkage approach to assessing the contribution of hospital-associated SARS-CoV-2 infection to care home outbreaks in England, 30 January to 12 October 2020

Public Health England

This study investigated care homes that received coronavirus (COVID-19) positive patients discharged from hospital, and subsequently experienced an outbreaks (herein referred to as hospital associated seeding of care home outbreaks). Hospital discharge records were linked to laboratory confirmed COVID-19 cases to identify care home residents who may have acquired their COVID-19 infection whilst in hospital and subsequent to their discharge, their care homes experienced an outbreak of COVID-19. In summary: from 30 January to 12 October 2020, there were a total of 43,398 care home residents identified with a laboratory confirmed positive COVID-19 test result; of these, 35,760 (82.4%) were involved in an outbreak, equivalent to a total of 5,882 outbreaks; 1.6% (n=97) of outbreaks were identified as potentially seeded from hospital associated COVID-19 infection, with a total of 806 (1.2%) care home residents with confirmed infection associated with these outbreaks; the majority of these potentially hospital-seeded care home outbreaks were identified in March to mid-April 2020, with none identified from the end of July until September where a few recent cases have emerged.

Last updated on hub: 31 May 2021

A minimum income standard for the United Kingdom in 2020

Joseph Rowntree Foundation

This update of the Minimum Income Standard (MIS) presents new research in which parents identified what families with children need now to meet material needs and participate in society. It shows that in order to reach a minimum socially acceptable living standard in 2020, a single person needs to earn £19,200 a year, and a couple with two children each need to earn £18,700. The report considers how temporary increases in Universal Credit and tax credits in response to COVID-19 are helping low-income families. The results show the extent to which these increases, combined with a higher National Living Wage, can help these households move closer to a minimum, providing them with opportunities to build a better life. The report finds that for working families, the results are encouraging; for those out of work, they represent an improvement for some families, but even those who benefit must still live with well below what members of the public consider an acceptable minimum. It concludes by arguing that while the COVID-19 crisis has had damaging effects on the incomes and well-being of many households, it has also led the Government to introduce a system for helping people hit by low income at a more adequate level than previously. This demonstration of what more adequate support looks like sets an example for the future, creating a case for not returning to the previous levels.

Last updated on hub: 15 July 2020

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