COVID-19 resources for Managers and leaders

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The tech pandemic: the long-term impact of COVID-19 on the usage of technology in specialist housing

Appello

This report follows a series of reports produced in Summer 2020, which, following the first wave of COVID-19, looked at the initial changes in perceptions towards technology in specialist housing – i.e. any housing scheme where housing, support and sometimes care services are provided as an integrated package. Those reports identified significant changes in perceptions as specialist housing providers turned to technology to enable them to maintain services for their customers and ensure a safe living environment. This report looks to understand whether the initial novelty and appreciation for technology has waned or is this something we want to embrace as part of the future of specialist housing. Developed with the Housing Learning and Improvement Network (LIN), this report is based on research undertaken between April-May 2021, with 133 senior housing professionals representing housing association and local authorities across the UK. The report reveals that 79% of housing providers feel there has been as increase interest in technology amongst supported housing customers as a result of Covid-19; 89% of housing providers believe their frontline staff have a greater appetite for using technology due to Covid-19; 82% of housing providers believe that changes in perceptions towards technology will have a long-term influence beyond Covid-19; 62% of housing providers say their investment in technology will increase following Covid-19; 26% of housing providers think they will significantly increase their remote working for traditionally site staff, 37% will slightly increase, 24% are unsure and 13%will make no changes.

Last updated on hub: 28 July 2021

Vulnerable children and young people survey: summary of returns waves 1 to 25

Department for Education

Findings of a survey of local authorities in England to help understand the impact of the coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak on children’s social care. Local authorities were asked to report on the following areas: contact with children supported by the local authority children’s social care; children’s social care workforce; and system pressures. Headline figures for Wave 25 of the survey are as follow. The total number of children looked after (CLA) was 2% higher than the same time in 2019-20 and the total number of children on a child protection plan (CPP) was 6% lower. A large proportion of CLA, children on a CPP and other children in need (CIN) have been in contact with a social worker in the last four weeks (67%, 93% and 61% respectively). The proportion of social workers not working due to coronavirus (COVID-19) has remained low with 3% of local authorities reporting over 10% of social workers unavailable due to coronavirus (COVID-19). The proportion of local authorities reporting over 10% of their residential care staff unable to work due to coronavirus (COVID19) has also remained low at 5%. Note that some local authorities have small residential care workforces and therefore a small change in the number of staff available may result in a large change in the proportion unavailable. The total number of referrals during Wave 25 was 17% lower than the usual number at that time of year. However, as Wave 25 fell during half term for most schools and the timing of the holidays differs from year to year, this comparison should be treated with caution. The total number of children who started to be looked after reported in waves 1 to 25 of the survey was 10,020. This is around 29% lower than the same period in 2017-20.

Last updated on hub: 27 July 2021

COVID-19: preparing for the future: looking ahead to winter 2021/22 and beyond

Academy of Medical Sciences

This report sets out a number of priorities for safeguarding the health and the wellbeing of the UK population for winter 2021/22 and beyond. It outlines three key challenges that will be faced by the UK this winter and beyond: a resurgence of respiratory infectious diseases, including COVID-19, influenza and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV); wider health and wellbeing impacts of the pandemic, including long COVID, mental and physical deconditioning, and the impact of delays in diagnosis and disease management during the pandemic; continued disruption to health and social care service delivery, including managing the backlog of treatment and diagnosis, incorporating IPC measures, and the financial precariousness of social care. To address these challenges, the report proposes a series of prevention and mitigation measures: vaccination to reduce severity and incidence of disease; behavioural and environmental interventions; managing the wider health and wellbeing impacts of the pandemic; supporting health and social care settings to ensure that COVID-19 and routine care can take place in parallel.

Last updated on hub: 19 July 2021

Adult social care monthly statistics, England: July 2021

Department of Health and Social Care

Experimental statistics on a range of topics including infection control measures, staffing levels, coronavirus (COVID-19) vaccinations and testing for COVID-19 in adult social care settings. As of 22 June 2021, the proportions who had received both doses of the COVID-19 vaccine were: 92.2% of residents and 72.8% of staff of older adult care homes; 86.1% of residents of younger adult care homes; 70.1% of staff of younger adult care homes, 57.8% of domiciliary care staff and 29.1% of staff employed in other social care settings. In the week ending 22 June 2021: 93% of care homes in England were able to accommodate residents receiving visitors within care homes, compared to 40.3% at the beginning of March 2021; 83.8% of care homes who had staff required to self-isolate paid those staff their full wages while self-isolating. This proportion has remained consistent since mid-December; 76.1% of care homes had no staff members working in another health or social care setting, this proportion has remained largely consistent since mid-December. Between mid-May and the end of June, there has been a gradual increase in the number of positive PCR and LFD tests returned from care home staff, but this is still substantially fewer compared to mid-January; the number of positive PCR and LFD tests returned from care home residents has been broadly stable and remains substantially lower than mid-January levels.

Last updated on hub: 12 July 2021

Adult social care monthly statistics, England: June 2021

Department of Health and Social Care

Experimental statistics on a range of topics including infection control measures, staffing levels, coronavirus (COVID-19) vaccinations and testing for COVID-19 in adult social care settings. As of 25 May 2021, the proportions who had received both doses of the COVID-19 vaccine were: 88.0% of residents and 65.7% of staff of older adult care homes; 79.4% of residents of younger adult care homes; 61.1% of staff of younger adult care homes, 48.0% of domiciliary care staff and 22.7% of staff employed in other social care settings. In the same week, 87.4% of care homes in England were able to accommodate residents receiving visitors within care homes, compared to 40.3% at the beginning of March 2021; 84.2% of care homes who had staff required to self-isolate paid those staff their full wages while self-isolating; 76.7% of care homes had no staff members working in another health or social care setting, this proportion has remained largely consistent since mid-December. There were 467,100 PCR tests and 498,456 LFD tests taken by care home staff. There were 230 positive results returned from PCR tests and 306 returned from LFD tests, this has substantially decreased for both kits compared to mid-January. There were 77,499 PCR tests and 8,920 LFD tests taken by care home residents. There were 61 positive results returned from PCR tests and 4 returned from LFD tests, this has substantially decreased for both kits compared to mid-January.

Last updated on hub: 12 July 2021

Does one dose of vaccine stop Covid-19 infection in care home residents?

University College London (UCL)

Summarises findings from the VIVALDI study, which finds that a single dose of COVID-19 vaccine gives care home residents a good level of protection against COVID-19 infection after one month. Between December 2020 and March 2021, we investigated whether one dose of vaccine protects care home residents against COVID-19 infection. We looked at vaccination information, blood tests and nasal swab tests from 10,000 residents in 310 care homes across England. This was a period before most people in the UK had been offered their second COVID-19 vaccine. The results showed that one dose of vaccine provides some protection against COVID-19 in care home residents, but it is important to get a second dose to get the best level of protection.

Last updated on hub: 07 July 2021

Can care home staff and residents be infected with Covid-19 more than once?

University College London (UCL)

Summarises findings of a study demonstrating that people living and working in care homes who have been infected with COVID19 before are unlikely to get infected a second time. Between June 2020 and February 2021, we investigated whether people in care homes can get infected with COVID-19 more than once. We looked at blood and nasal swab test results from 2,000 staff and residents in 100 Four Seasons Health Care homes across England. The results showed that people in care homes who have previously been infected with COVID-19 are unlikely to get infected a second time, but it is important to get the vaccine to get the best level of protection.

Last updated on hub: 07 July 2021

Incidence of SARS-CoV-2 infection according to baseline antibody status in staff and residents of 100 long-term care facilities (VIVALDI): a prospective cohort study

The Lancet

Background: SARS-CoV-2 infection represents a major challenge for long-term care facilities (LTCFs) and many residents and staff are seropositive following persistent outbreaks. We aimed to investigate the association between the SARS-CoV-2 antibody status at baseline and subsequent infection in this population. Methods: We did a prospective cohort study of SARS-CoV-2 infection in staff (aged <65 years) and residents (aged >65 years) at 100 LTCFs in England between Oct 1, 2020, and Feb 1, 2021. Blood samples were collected between June and November, 2020, at baseline, and 2 and 4 months thereafter and tested for IgG antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 nucleocapsid and spike proteins. PCR testing for SARS-CoV-2 was done weekly in staff and monthly in residents. Cox regression was used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) of a PCR-positive test by baseline antibody status, adjusted for age and sex, and stratified by LTCF. Findings: 682 residents from 86 LCTFs and 1429 staff members from 97 LTCFs met study inclusion criteria. At baseline, IgG antibodies to nucleocapsid were detected in 226 (33%) of 682 residents and 408 (29%) of 1429 staff members. 93 (20%) of 456 residents who were antibody-negative at baseline had a PCR-positive test (infection rate 0·054 per month at risk) compared with four (2%) of 226 residents who were antibody-positive at baseline (0·007 per month at risk). 111 (11%) of 1021 staff members who were antibody-negative at baseline had PCR-positive tests (0·042 per month at risk) compared with ten (2%) of 408 staff members who were antibody-positive staff at baseline (0·009 per month at risk). The risk of PCR-positive infection was higher for residents who were antibody-negative at baseline than residents who were antibody-positive at baseline (adjusted HR [aHR] 0·15, 95% CI 0·05–0·44, p=0·0006), and the risk of a PCR-positive infection was also higher for staff who were antibody-negative at baseline compared with staff who were antibody-positive at baseline (aHR 0·39, 0·19–0·82; p=0·012). 12 of 14 reinfected participants had available data on symptoms, and 11 of these participants were symptomatic. Antibody titres to spike and nucleocapsid proteins were comparable in PCR-positive and PCR-negative cases. Interpretation: The presence of IgG antibodies to nucleocapsid protein was associated with substantially reduced risk of reinfection in staff and residents for up to 10 months after primary infection.

Last updated on hub: 07 July 2021

Vaccine effectiveness of the first dose of ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 and BNT162b2 against SARS-CoV-2 infection in residents of long-term care facilities in England (VIVALDI): a prospective cohort study

The Lancet

Background The effectiveness of SARS-CoV-2 vaccines in older adults living in long-term care facilities is uncertain. We investigated the protective effect of the first dose of the Oxford-AstraZeneca non-replicating viral-vectored vaccine (ChAdOx1 nCoV-19; AZD1222) and the Pfizer-BioNTech mRNA-based vaccine (BNT162b2) in residents of long-term care facilities in terms of PCR-confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection over time since vaccination. […] Findings: 10 412 care home residents aged 65 years and older from 310 LTCFs were included in this analysis. The median participant age was 86 years (IQR 80–91), 7247 (69·6%) of 10412 residents were female, and 1155 residents (11·1%) had evidence of previous SARS-CoV-2 infection. 9160 (88·0%) residents received at least one vaccine dose, of whom 6138 (67·0%) received ChAdOx1 and 3022 (33·0%) received BNT162b2. Between Dec 8, 2020, and March 15, 2021, there were 36352 PCR results in 670628 person-days, and 1335 PCR-positive infections (713 in unvaccinated residents and 612 in vaccinated residents) were included. Adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) for PCR-positive infection relative to unvaccinated residents declined from 28 days after the first vaccine dose to 0·44 (95% CI 0·24–0·81) at 28–34 days and 0·38 (0·19–0·77) at 35–48 days. Similar effect sizes were seen for ChAdOx1 (adjusted HR 0·32, 95% CI 0·15–0·66) and BNT162b2 (0·35, 0·17–0·71) vaccines at 35–48 days. Mean PCR Ct values were higher for infections that occurred at least 28 days after vaccination than for those occurring before vaccination (31·3 [SD 8·7] in 107 PCR-positive tests vs 26·6 [6·6] in 552 PCR-positive tests; p<0·0001). Interpretation: Single-dose vaccination with BNT162b2 and ChAdOx1 vaccines provides substantial protection against infection in older adults from 4–7 weeks after vaccination and might reduce SARS-CoV-2 transmission. However, the risk of infection is not eliminated, highlighting the ongoing need for non-pharmaceutical interventions to prevent transmission in long-term care facilities.

Last updated on hub: 07 July 2021

COVID-19 testing schedule for a suspected or confirmed outbreak in a care home

Department of Health and Social Care

Guidance for care homes dealing with a suspected or confirmed outbreak of Covid-19. Care homes should follow a regular staff testing regime of weekly PCR testing and twice weekly lateral flow testing. An outbreak is defined as 2 or more clinically suspected or confirmed positives (rapid lateral flow or PCR) among residents or staff detected in the same 14-day period. However, one positive test result may be the first sign of an outbreak, so you should contact your local health protection team (HPT) for advice in this instance. The guidance explains what to do In the event of an outbreak; and covers: rapid response daily staff testing; outbreak testing; determining the end of an outbreak; the 90-day window after a positive test; newly symptomatic people; and what to do if more test kits are needed. [Last updated: 7 July 2021]

Last updated on hub: 30 June 2021

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