COVID-19 resources for Managers and leaders

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Adult social care in England, monthly statistics: June 2021

Department of Health and Social Care

This statistical bulletin provides an overview on a range of information on social care settings, with a focus on the impact of COVID-19. This report provides newly published information on: selected infection prevention control (IPC) measures in care homes at national, regional and local authority (LA) level; staffing levels in care homes at national, regional and LA level; personal protective equipment (PPE) availability in care homes at national, regional and LA level; testing for COVID-19 in care homes at national, regional and LA level. This report also includes previously published statistics on first and second dose uptake of COVID-19 vaccinations in adult social care settings. As of 25 May 2021, the proportions who had received both doses of the COVID-19 vaccine were: 88.0% of residents and 65.7% of staff of older adult care homes; 79.4% of residents of younger adult care homes; 61.1% of staff of younger adult care homes, 48.0% of domiciliary care staff and 22.7% of staff employed in other social care settings.

Last updated on hub: 14 June 2021

Adult social care in England, monthly statistics: May 2021

Department of Health and Social Care

This statistical bulletin provides an overview on a range of information on social care settings, with a focus on the impact of COVID-19. This report provides newly published information on: selected infection prevention control (IPC) measures in care homes at national, regional and local authority (LA) level; staffing levels in care homes at national, regional and LA level; testing for COVID-19 in care homes at national, regional and LA level. This report also includes previously published statistics on first dose uptake of COVID-19 vaccinations in adult social care settings. As of 27 April 2021, the proportions who had received the first dose of the COVID-19 vaccine were: 94.6% of residents and 81.0% of staff of older adult care homes; 89.8% of residents of younger adult care homes; 77.5% of staff of younger adult care homes, 72.8% of domiciliary care staff and 70.7% of staff employed in other social care settings.

Last updated on hub: 14 June 2021

Third quarterly report on progress to address COVID-19 health inequalities

Her Majesty's Government

This is the third quarterly report on progress to address the findings of Public Health England’s (PHE) review into disparities in the risks and outcomes of COVID-19. The report summarises work across government and through national and local partnerships, to improve vaccine uptake among ethnic minorities. A data-informed approach, targeted communication and engagement and flexible deployment models are the cornerstones of vaccine equalities delivery. This approach includes measures to support vaccinations during Ramadan, extending the use of places of worship as vaccination centres to around 50 different venues with many more acting as pop-up sites, delivering out of hours clinics, outreach into areas of lower uptake and encouraging family group vaccinations for those living in multi-generational homes who may be at increased risk of contracting and transmitting COVID-19 infection. This report also summarises progress with the Community Champions scheme that was launched in January, outlining activity across the 60 local authorities that received funding through this scheme. By the end of the second month, there were over 4,653 individual Community Champions working on the programme, who are playing a vital role in tackling misinformation and driving vaccine uptake. Communications and cross-government COVID-19 campaign activity over the last 3 months has continued to focus on encouraging vaccine uptake as the rollout expands. While positive vaccine sentiment has increased over time, there is still hesitancy to be addressed. The increase in the Black population is substantial but vaccine confidence is still lower in this group than any other. This remains a particular issue for Black healthcare workers.

Last updated on hub: 09 June 2021

Support for people with a learning disability

House of Commons Library

Describes recent changes to policy and services for people with a learning disability in England. Over 1.2 million people in England have a learning disability. The Government and NHS England are working to reduce health inequalities for people with a learning disability and have established national programmes to improve treatment and outcomes. The briefing details these initiatives, looking specifically at health policies, employment, social security, education. The briefing also provides a summary of the impact of Coronavirus (COVID-19) on people with learning disabilities in England.

Last updated on hub: 09 June 2021

Voices during the Covid-19 pandemic: the impact on children, young people and child helplines around the world

Child Helpline International

This report aims to understand the impact the pandemic has had, not only on the children and young people who contact child helplines, but also on the child helplines’ operations. We undertook four quarterly surveys of the members of Child Helpline International covering the whole year (January to December 2020). This report presents our findings, the conclusions that can be drawn from these findings, and key recommendations to ensure that child helplines can continue their vital work. These special surveys revealed that, globally, our child helpline members received 25% more contacts in 2020 as compared to 2019. Violence and mental health were important reasons for contact globally in 2020, as they already were in 2019. However, in 2020 requests for information about Covid-19, and contacts relating to family relationships, access to essential services and the caller’s own physical health emerged as the other main reasons for making contact. The child helplines who participated in this research also reported that their operations had been noticeably impacted by the Covid-19 pandemic. This impact related both to an increased demand from children and young people and to the various national restriction measures put in place in response to the pandemic. Most importantly, the vast majority of child helplines proved to be extremely resilient and they were able to continue their operations. 94% of the respondents indicated that they remained operational.

Last updated on hub: 09 June 2021

VacciNation: exploring vaccine confidence with people from African, Bangladeshi, Caribbean and Pakistani backgrounds living in England: insight report

Healthwatch England

Findings from a study to better understand current trends in vaccine barriers among Black and Asian people. The report is based on in-depth conversations and online exercises with 95 participants from African, Bangladeshi, Caribbean, and Pakistani ethnicity over a period of five weeks during March and April. Attitudes to the vaccine are incredibly personal and we cannot make any broad conclusions about whole communities from our findings. We have drawn out some key themes to support improvement in the way the NHS and other public health professionals communicate with the public. These are: individual agency and an ability for a person to act on their own behalf is important in relation to the COVID-19 vaccine; independence of institutions and those who speak for them; participants associated levels of trust with the level of real-world experience an individual had; participants linked the notions of transparency and trust together; targeted messaging can have the opposite to the intended impact; conscious and unconscious trust needs to be considered.

Last updated on hub: 08 June 2021

Would you take a COVID-19 vaccine? Rapid survey report and recommendations on the social care sector 2020

This rapid report summarises the findings from our recent survey of people working in social care nationally on whether they would have a COVID-19 vaccine and why. Survey results were taken over the period 15th November 2020 to 30th November 2020. This is during the time that reports of successful trials for viable vaccines were first released but just shy of verification by the medicines regulator, the MHRA, of the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine which was announced on 2nd December 2020. We asked respondents to comment on their confidence in taking a vaccine. We were particularly interested in the reasons behind any misgivings about taking a vaccine. The aim of this report is to assist health professionals and policy makers in providing specific and directed messaging about any potential vaccine which will directly address reported concerns. We identified the following themes from responses to our survey and concerns raised: side effects; efficacy; age and existing health conditions; and transparency and trust. The research has found that clear FAQs providing information on the vaccine, trust in messaging and roll out capability, as well as making it easy to physically access the vaccination site, are amongst key implications for improving uptake of the vaccine across the social care workforce.

Last updated on hub: 07 June 2021

Disability employment: from pandemic to recovery

Learning and Work Institute

This study seeks to understand the impact of the pandemic on disability employment and disabled people’s lives. It draws on findings from a detailed literature review, labour market analysis and in-depth interviews with 20 disabled people. The report finds that disabled people have long faced significant labour market challenges – while the employment rate for disabled people had been steadily increasing prior to the pandemic, the disability employment rate gap has remained stubbornly high and was 28.1 percentage points in 2019. The pandemic has had a disproportionate impact on disabled people – employment fell sharply among disabled people during 2020, and the disability employment rate gap widened from 28.1 percentage points to 29 percentage points between Q4 2019 and Q4 2020. Unemployment rates for disabled people (those not working but still looking and available for work) increased in line with rates of non-disabled people in 2020, albeit from a higher starting point, while rates of economic inactivity (those not working but also not looking for a job or unable to work) increased much more sharply, as more disabled people stopped looking for work. The research also found that the pandemic harmed disabled people’s health and wellbeing. Many disabled people said their physical and mental health deteriorated due to the pandemic. Additionally, many reported that they could not attend their medical consultations during the pandemic which might also have a long-term impact on their health.

Last updated on hub: 07 June 2021

Providers Deliver: collaborating for better care

NHS Providers

This report features 14 innovative cases studies which showcase successful cooperation between providers in the acute, mental health, community and ambulance sectors, working together and with local partners. The case studies provide a striking insight into how the COVID-19 pandemic accelerated the drive towards collaboration both within and across integrated care systems (ICSs), with providers and wider system partners supporting each other during an incredibly challenging time. The report sets out factors that can help or hinder that collaboration and outlines the support trust leaders need next from national NHS leaders. Key ingredients for successful provider collaborations include: strong leadership; a clear shared vision; time and patience to build relationships and embed new ways of working. The report also offers valuable understanding into the unequal impact of the pandemic on minority groups and communities and the way in which trusts and their partners have adapted and innovated to tackle health inequalities in the wake of COVID-19.

Last updated on hub: 07 June 2021

Towards resilience: making community matter in social care

Local Trust

This report summarises findings from an event co-hosted by Think Local Act Personal (TLAP) and Local Trust. It explores the fragility and fragmented nature of adult social care both before and during the pandemic. It highlights how community focused initiatives are key to a more resilient future for all those that draw on, provide or commission adult social care support. Key points include: the pandemic has shown how transformation can be achieved when state, communities and individuals work together – what we choose to do next with this opportunity is key; services should take a person-centred approach and move away from being service led; we should invest in transformation by scaling back activities that don’t work; convene and support a network of people developing asset-based areas – making visible the myriad of skills, knowledge, connections and potential within a community (the assets), and focusing on nurturing the strengths and resources of people and communities as basis of social care commissioning; Local Authorities (LAs) should actively engage with community groups, such as Big Local Partnerships, to help accelerate trust and confidence in devolving more responsibility, funding and decision-making to local citizen led groups.

Last updated on hub: 07 June 2021

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