COVID-19 resources for managers and leaders

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“Spend time with me”: children and young people’s experiences of COVID-19 and the justice system

Centre for Youth & Criminal Justice

This paper shares findings from research gathering the views of children and young people with experience of the justice system on COVID-19 and associated restrictions. Youth justice practitioners were also consulted, and shared practice examples as case studies. The study shows that the biggest issues facing children and young people in the justice system are isolation and lack of contact with others. Boredom, lack of activity and being stuck at home were also reported to be significant issues in complying with restrictions. This is in spite of almost all children and young people reporting they have been able to stay in touch with family and friends, and practitioners developing creative methods to sustain contact, and continue to support children, young people and their families. Particular challenges were identified with the operation of the justice system across all areas of the Whole System Approach. Some existing challenges such as delays to processes and release from custody have been exacerbated by COVID-19. A range of factors have worked in supporting children and young people: keeping in touch through creative methods; ensuring access to things to keep them occupied, practical resources and technology; working with partners; and the dedication of staff. This evidence has been used to inform the Alternative Child Rights Impact Assessment about the coronavirus, commissioned by the Children and Young People’s Commissioner Scotland.

Last updated on hub: 29 June 2020

10 leaps forward: innovation in the pandemic. What we want to keep from this experience: going ‘back to better’

London South Bank University

An analysis of the findings of an online survey asking leaders and clinicians to reflect and play back in their own words the most important transformations that have happened due to COVID-19. The findings show that in a very short time healthcare services have learned to operate as a highly performing system and made significant advances. These include: staff being properly valued and supported; using 21st century tools; working with connected, visible, engaged leaders; care basics and inefficiencies have been fixed and sorted; local health systems have joined up together to get things done; staff working together as real teams; staff have stepped up and acted with professionalism and autonomy. As a result, the healthcare system is now better placed to make decisions based on needs and think pro-actively; to make mutual decisions with patients as partners; and to work in close collaboration with its community.

Last updated on hub: 16 June 2020

A minimum income standard for the United Kingdom in 2020

Joseph Rowntree Foundation

This update of the Minimum Income Standard (MIS) presents new research in which parents identified what families with children need now to meet material needs and participate in society. It shows that in order to reach a minimum socially acceptable living standard in 2020, a single person needs to earn £19,200 a year, and a couple with two children each need to earn £18,700. The report considers how temporary increases in Universal Credit and tax credits in response to COVID-19 are helping low-income families. The results show the extent to which these increases, combined with a higher National Living Wage, can help these households move closer to a minimum, providing them with opportunities to build a better life. The report finds that for working families, the results are encouraging; for those out of work, they represent an improvement for some families, but even those who benefit must still live with well below what members of the public consider an acceptable minimum. It concludes by arguing that while the COVID-19 crisis has had damaging effects on the incomes and well-being of many households, it has also led the Government to introduce a system for helping people hit by low income at a more adequate level than previously. This demonstration of what more adequate support looks like sets an example for the future, creating a case for not returning to the previous levels.

Last updated on hub: 15 July 2020

A perfect storm: the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic on domestic abuse survivors and the services supporting them

Women’s Aid

This report presents findings from the first phase of a research project exploring the impact of Covid-19 on experiences of domestic abuse for adult and child survivors and the specialist domestic services supporting them. It draws on the analysis of data from existing service directories, a thematic analysis of trends, and initial and follow-up surveys of providers and survivors. Findings suggest that whilst the Covid-19 pandemic did not cause domestic abuse, it created a perfect storm of challenges for survivors and the services supporting them. The lockdown measures gave perpetrators a tool that they quickly learnt to use for coercion, manipulation and to induce fear. This in turn exposed survivors to worsening domestic abuse, whilst restricting their access to support. At the same time, the pandemic created challenges for the specialist domestic abuse support sector in providing life-saving support, including lost income, staff shortages and additional costs of remote working. The report argues that to address this perfect storm domestic abuse must be seen as a priority at the highest level within all work across government; businesses and communities need to play a critical role in raising awareness of abuse and signposting survivors to specialist support; the government must create a long-term sustainable funding solution for all support services; and the government must address the recommendations outlined by sector experts looking at the impact of Covid-19 on the experiences of Black and minoritised women, migrant women, Deaf and disabled women and other marginalised groups.

Last updated on hub: 20 August 2020

Accessing support : the role of the voluntary and community sector during COVID-19

Local Government Association

A briefing paper to provide councils and community and voluntary sector with information on the role and contribution of the community and voluntary sector and the use of volunteers in local and national responses to the COVID-19 pandemic. It includes links to resources, guidance and tools to support councils to work effectively with national and local voluntary and community services and in the use of volunteers. The briefing was published on 2 June 2020.

Last updated on hub: 04 June 2020

Accommodation for perpetrators of domestic abuse: emerging issues and responses due to COVID-19

Drive Project

Isolation and social distancing during the COVID-19 lockdown have led and are likely to continue to lead to an increase in domestic abuse, violence and coercive control at all levels of risk. This paper argues that, where it would be in the best interests of the victim and better ensure their safety and wellbeing, adequate housing provision is urgently needed for perpetrators of domestic violence. The lack of availability of such accommodation is limiting options available to victims and police in their endeavour to keep victims safe.

Last updated on hub: 30 June 2020

Achieving residential care business success: moving beyond COVID-19

CoolCare

Coming from a range of backgrounds of working and investing in residential care provision, the panellists in this webinar offer practical ideas on how residential care businesses can move through the coronavirus crisis as well sharing their views on the future of the market. The webinar provides advice and guidance on a multitude of topics, including: new care home design and layout trends to boost enquiry conversions and infection control; the power technology is having on restoring consumer confidence when placing a loved one; and new staffing processes that are been implemented to boost compliance and minimise risk.

Last updated on hub: 13 July 2020

ADASS budget survey 2020

Association of Directors of Adult Social Services

This report presents the finding of an annual survey of the director of adult social services, focusing on budgets for adult social care in councils and, additionally, on the impact of COVID-19 on adult social care and local authorities’ response to it. From the analysis of the survey responses the following key messages emerge: without significant financial intervention from the Government, the lives of people who use social care and their family carers will be seriously impacted in terms of their lives and wellbeing; the actual costs to local authorities and adult social care providers of the pandemic will far outstrip the Emergency Funding made available by the Government to-date; the risk of already fragile care markets failing has significantly heightened as a result of the impacts of COVID-19; only 4 per cent of respondents are fully confident that their budget will be sufficient to meet their statutory duties this year, down from 35 per cent in 2019/20; a fundamental shift in resources is required from Government as part of a long-term funding settlement for adult social care and to ensure the workforce is adequately rewarded for their commitment and highly skilled and essential work. The report calls for a two-year ringfenced funding settlement for adult social care to cover the additional costs of COVID-19 and to allow reform to be agreed, planned and implemented; a new employment deal with social care staff; reform of the care provider market to ensure sustainability, economic growth and quality of care; and a consultation programme with extensive public engagement over the next two years to build the care and support that people want for the short and long term.

Last updated on hub: 30 June 2020

ADASS coronavirus survey

Association of Directors of Adult Social Services

This report presents the results of a survey of the Director of Adult Social Services on the impact of Covid-19 on adult social care and councils’ response to it. It focuses in particular on the steps local authorities have taken to meet the changing social care needs in the context of the pandemic; their engagement with and support to providers; the sustainability of the care market; and the interface between the NHS and social care. Almost a quarter of all respondents said that social care need had increased, mostly as result temporary closure of services, providers’ concerns about accepting new clients and people declining services they are offered. Councils have responded to the increase in need by enhancing their information and advice offer; re-training council staff; using volunteers; increased use of digital technology and drawing capacity from other areas. The survey shows that a number of Directors believe there are insufficient primary and community services in their local areas and that around a quarter thought that more than half of care home Covid-19 infections were attributable to rapid hospital discharge (combined with a lack of PPE and testing). The report identifies four key lessons from the response to COVID-19: there has been too much emphasis on protecting the NHS at the expense of care homes; more protection for care homes was needed – including not discharging Covid-19 patients from hospital to care homes; testing before discharge and step-down facilities before care home admission; and improved supply of PPE.

Last updated on hub: 15 June 2020

ADASS rapid survey: how are local authorities supporting local social care providers to respond to Covid-19?

Association of Directors of Adult Social Services

The results of a rapid survey of Association of Directors of Adult Social Services (ADASS) members to gather data about the measures local authorities have put in place to support local social care providers during the COVID-19 outbreak. It found that 95% of responding local authorities are using a variety of payments in advance to support care providers. Of those local authorities that have taken action to address the temporary cost pressures facing providers, 97% have provided financial support to providers. The survey was carried out between 28th April to 1 May 2020 and received from 89% of local authorities with responsibility for Adult Social Care in England.

Last updated on hub: 29 May 2020