COVID-19 resources for managers and leaders

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The impact of technology in adult social care provider services

Institute of Public Care

A rapid action research and analysis of adult social care provider services to share learning on how technology is being used during the Covid-19 pandemic, and to capture the barriers, enabling factors and benefits of adopting technology. A new helpline to support the adult social care sector to use technology was set up by Digital Social Care during the pandemic and the Institute of Public Care undertook telephone interviews with helpline callers who opted-in to the action research and with other sector stakeholders. The findings show that the number of visitors to the Digital Social Care website more than doubled from the end of February to the end of April 2020, reflecting the rapid increase in social care providers starting to use NHSmail, video conferencing and other digital technologies. This rapid onboarding and digital adoption was not without problems, resulting in very variable experiences for providers. In particular, the process for application, registration and activation of NHSmail is still challenging and slow for many care providers, even with the simplified requirements. The report calls for a coordinated approach to ensure digital adoption and innovation continues, is sustained and becomes the new normal. This should include recognising the scale of the support needed by the sector to adopt digital technology safely and broadening NHS digital support and engagement to include homecare, extra care and supported living providers to realise benefits for vulnerable people living in the community.

Last updated on hub: 03 August 2020

Readying the NHS and social care for the COVID-19 peak

House of Commons

An examination of the health and social care response to COVID-19 in England and of the challenges to the services that the outbreak posed. The NHS was severely stretched but able to meet overall demand for COVID-19 treatment during the pandemic’s April peak; from early March to mid-May, the NHS increased the quantity of available ventilators and other breathing support, which are essential for the care of many COVID-patients. The report suggests that it has been a very different story for adult social care, despite the hard work and commitment of its workforce. Years of inattention, funding cuts and delayed reforms have been compounded by the Government’s slow, inconsistent and, at times, negligent approach to giving the sector the support it needed during the pandemic – responsibilities and accountabilities were unclear at the outset and there has been a failure to issue consistent and coherent guidance throughout the pandemic; 25,000 patients from were discharged from hospitals into care homes without making sure all were first tested for COVID-19; and the Government failed to provide adequate PPE for the social care sector and testing to the millions of staff and volunteers through the first peak of the crisis. The report argues that there are many lessons that the government must learn, not least giving adult social care equal support to the NHS and considering them as two parts of a single system, adequately funded and with clear accountability arrangements.

Last updated on hub: 03 August 2020

Introduction to Safeguarding Adult Reviews (SARs) In Rapid Time

Social Care Institute for Excellence

SCIE discusses the need for a rapid review process to enable system learning that is identified and shared beyond the location of the incident.

Last updated on hub: 31 July 2020

Hospital discharge and preventing unnecessary hospital admissions (COVID-19)

Social Care Institute for Excellence

This guide discusses the lessons learned from hospital discharge and avoidance during the COVID-19 pandemic. It highlights challenges faced and good practice to prevent unnecessary admissions going forward.

Last updated on hub: 31 July 2020

Webinar recording: Co-production and communities

Social Care Institute for Excellence

SCIE will be looking at how commissioners and communities can work successfully together to maximise the existing resources and provide the best possible outcomes for people.

Last updated on hub: 31 July 2020

COVID-19: In conversation with Kate Terroni

Social Care Institute for Excellence

Dr Ossie Stuart, SCIE trustee, in conversation with Kate Terroni, Chief Inspector of Adult Social Care at the Care Quality Commission

Last updated on hub: 30 July 2020

Flipping social care: stepping into the unknown

Association of Directors of Adult Social Services

This briefing considers how social care can be seen as an investment in communities and not just as an unavoidable cost to society. The principle of ‘flipping social care’, which is the focus of the paper, is about recognising and valuing the economic benefits and opportunities that flow from a vibrant and well-resourced social care sector. Whilst acknowledging that Covid-19 has challenged the sector in countless ways, the paper suggests that the case for the sector as a driver for economic prosperity remains intact, and it is arguably stronger than before. The sector has long been wrestling with the fact that the solutions and approaches to health and care that are used today are unlikely to be sustainable as demand continues to grow – the pandemic is magnifying the challenge and accelerating the urgency with which this must be met. The paper sets out how the ‘flipping social care’ principle can be realised through a vision for adult social care in the West Midlands. This entails putting justice for the most vulnerable and marginalised citizens at the centre; ensuring decisions about local areas are entrusted to the people who live and work locally, have a track record and know what their communities need; delivering truly-integrated working across social care and health services; building a strong case for intelligent public investment in social care as a driver for economic prosperity as well as social wellbeing; moving away from offering care from buildings to planning support around a person’s strengths and needs; using data and technology to understand what people need and how to target help and support more effectively; and designing a new and better way to ensure social care staff are paid fairly for what they do and can work in a healthy, supported and flexible way.

Last updated on hub: 28 July 2020

Safe, happy and together: design ideas for minimising the spread of infection whilst nurturing social interaction in later living communities

Housing LIN

This report outlines a series of practical design recommendations to control the transmission of coronavirus, and other everyday infections, in later-living housing whilst maintaining social interaction for residents. Later living, in this paper, refers to residential accommodation consisting of self-contained apartments with associated communal, support and ancillary spaces under one roof. The document is intended to be a practical guide for designers, operators and developers refurbishing ageing later-living housing projects or considering new ones. It identifies thirteen specific areas that would require improvements in order to safeguard the mental and physical health of residents, and to enable staff to manage additional tasks that might be required of them during a pandemic. Key recommendations include creating a separate entrance for staff and deliveries, additional storage for PPE, ventilators, sanitation equipment at all entrances and installing a traffic light system in the lobby to control movement in and out of the building or a ‘pop-up’ shelter in the entrance courtyard for supervised visits.

Last updated on hub: 28 July 2020

Supporting children and young people with SEND as schools and colleges prepare for wider opening

Department for Education

Risk assessment guidance for settings managing children and young people with an education, health and care (EHC) plan or complex needs during the coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak, including special schools, specialist colleges, local authorities and any other settings managing children and young people with SEND. [Updated 24 July 2020]

Last updated on hub: 28 July 2020

Adult social care: shaping a better future: nine statements to help shape adult social care reform

Association of Directors of Adult Social Services

This paper sets out nine statements which are intended to help shape the future of adult social care in a radical, person-centred and transformative way. As a result of Covid-19, a number of challenges have emerged and been brought to light– they offer an opportunity to rethink, redesign and reorientate care. The document argues that what is required now is a total reset; a wholesale reimaging of adult social care, built around the following statements: we need a public conversation about adult social care reform; locally integrated care, built around the individual, should be the norm; we need a complete review of how care markets operate; we must address existing and historical inequalities; housing is central to care and to our lives; we need a workforce strategy; we must prioritise access to technological and digital solutions; we need a cross-government strategy; we need to manage the transition. The paper calls for a two-year funding settlement in 2020 that ensures the short-term sustainability and continuity of care; creates the space to undertake the national conversation that will ultimately shape a new person-centred vision for adult social care, secure new deal for those that work in social care and family carers; and help properly transition to the new models of care that emerge as a result.

Last updated on hub: 27 July 2020