COVID-19 resources for managers and leaders

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Disabled women and Covid-19: research evidence

Women’s Budget Group

This briefing reports on analysis of a survey of 3,280 individuals, including 678 disabled people (377 women and 301 men), conducted in April 2020. The research identifies that disabled women are facing serious crises of financial support as a result of the pandemic. They are more likely to say that their household had already run out of money; and are more likely to report increased strain in home relationships, which suggests an additional domestic abuse risk when viewed in tandem with existing evidence about the higher risks disabled women face. More specifically, the analysis reveals that during lockdown six in ten disabled women are struggling to access necessities from the shops (63%), compared with 46% of non-disabled men 52% of non-disabled women. Six in ten disabled women also fear missing out on medicines, compared with 43% of non-disabled women and 37% of non-disabled men. They are also under significant financial pressure with a third of disabled women said that their household has nearly run out of money, compared with a fifth of non-disabled women and men. Over a third of disabled mothers said they were struggling to feed their children. The report sets out a number of steps relevant Government departments should take to alleviate these pressures, including improving access to support and benefits, offering more flexible care packages (portability of care packages) for disabled women trapped in social isolation and in danger from domestic abuse, and taking action to limit the spread of Covid19 in care homes, improve access to information and advice.

Last updated on hub: 15 June 2020

Disparities in the impact of COVID-19 in Black and Minority Ethnic populations: review of the evidence and recommendations for action

Independent Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies

A review of the evidence on the reasons why more people from black and ethnic minority (BME) backgrounds appear to be at greater risk of hospitalisation and deaths with COVID-19. The review suggests that the reasons are complex with interplay between socio-economic disadvantage in BME populations, high prevalence of chronic diseases and the impact of long-standing racial inequalities being key explanations. Specifically, people from disadvantaged backgrounds or deprived areas, and BME backgrounds are more likely to have shorter life expectancies as a result of their socioeconomic status; housing conditions, including overcrowding is also likely to have had an impact on vulnerability to COVID-19; ethnic minorities have been over-represented in key worker jobs with increased the risk of exposure, infection and death; racial inequalities has been a recurring theme with doctors and nurse surveys experiencing difficulty getting access to personal protection equipment; the adverse social and economic consequences of COVID-19 have been greater on ethnic minority groups. The report makes a number of recommendations to address the greater risk of adverse health outcomes in BME populations. These include recommendations with immediate impact on the course of the pandemic (to mitigate the differential risk of exposure, infection and transmission, and to inform local outbreak control strategies) and longer-term action to reduce health and employment inequalities.

Last updated on hub: 15 July 2020

Distance recruitment

Skills for Care

Face-to-face interviews are being replaced with video calls to maintain social distancing due to COVID-19. A candidate’s experience of the recruitment process will influence their view of the employer and interest in vacancies. This webinar provides tips on effective distance recruitment.

Last updated on hub: 29 June 2020

DoLS and Best Interests in response to Covid-19

National Mental Capacity Forum

This webinar explores the implications of Covid-19 and the lockdown for deprivation of liberty safeguarding and best interest decisions. It covers early issues raised with the Welsh Government; worries from those with learning difficulties; DoLS guidance; DoLS in practice; the law regarding best interests decision making; and critical care decision making and Covid-19.

Last updated on hub: 15 September 2020

Domestic violence and abuse: Safeguarding during the COVID-19 crisis

Social Care Institute for Excellence

A guide aimed at those supporting adults and children who are experiencing domestic abuse during the coronavirus crisis.

Last updated on hub: 22 April 2020

Draft final report: national advisory group: People with Learning Disabilities and Autistic People

Department of Health and Social Care

This is the report of the People with Learning Disabilities and Autistic People Advisory Group, established to make recommendations to feed into the work of the Social Care Sector COVID -19 Support Taskforce. The report calls for an end to the ethos of doing things for or to people, and instead embedding the practice of coproduction into all COVID-19 planning both locally and nationally. The Advisory Group’s highest priority recommendations are that government should commit to accessible guidance and communications for people with learning disabilities and autistic people, and their families, being issued with or very soon after all future COVID-19 guidance; restore, maintain and adapt the support for individuals and families already assessed as having eligible needs; urgently identify and provide the level of resources needed for councils or CCGs to financially stabilise provider organisations at risk of collapse; reduce isolation and loneliness for people with learning disabilities, autistic people and their families, through expanding the reach of NHS and other volunteering programmes, and COVID-19 hubs, to people with learning disabilities and autistic people, and investing in a national awareness campaign encouraging and enabling communities and mutual aid groups to be more inclusive and supportive; and reach individuals and families who don’t receive social care support or organise their own, but who are isolated or in crisis.

Last updated on hub: 21 September 2020

Emerging evidence: coronavirus and children and young people's mental health: issue 1

Evidence Based Practice Unit

A rapid review of the evidence on the key mental health challenges for children and young people during the Covid-19 pandemic, and how parents, carers, and professionals can help them to manage and minimise these challenges. It is the first of a series of reviews and covers evidence found from 1st January 2020 to 4th May 2020. The review finds that the key mental health challenges for children and young people during the pandemic include: the pandemic can influence many different aspects of mental health and may have longer-term consequences; higher than usual levels of stress, anxiety, depressive symptoms and fear have been found in children and young people; mental health challenges during the pandemic have been attributed to several events or conditions including school closures, increased time away from peers, health concerns, and media over-exposure. Support for children and young people’s mental health and wellbeing may include: promoting healthy habits such as sleeping well and daily exercise, recreating routines at home, and having clear and honest conversations about their child’s worries; small, daily acts can help promote health and emotional wellbeing in the home; teachers play a vital role in care and advocacy of positive mental health. In terms of support for those with mental health conditions, the most effective support will be adaptable and responsive to the evolving stages of the pandemic, and will involve a collaborative network which includes families, education, social care and health.

Last updated on hub: 28 September 2020

Emerging evidence: coronavirus and children and young people's mental health: issue 2

Evidence Based Practice Unit

A rapid review of the evidence on the key mental health challenges for children and young people during the Covid-19 pandemic, and how parents, carers, and professionals can help them to manage and minimise these challenges. It is the second of a series of reviews and captures research published between 5th May 2020 and 24th May 2020. The evidence suggests that the nature and duration of the pandemic and lockdown measures are having significant impacts on children and young people’s mental health, contributing to the onset as well as exacerbation of worry, fear, anxiety, depression, and posttraumatic stress. Children with pre-existing mental health and neurodevelopmental conditions and children from minority ethnic groups are at greater risk of mental health problems during the pandemic. Several social and economic factors (e.g. poverty, separation from parents and carers, domestic violence) make some young people more vulnerable to the mental health challenges of the pandemic. Researchers are emphasising the importance of monitoring the impact of the pandemic on children and young people’s mental health. As stresses and conflicting responsibilities increase, those supporting children and young people should also prioritise their own self-care in order to support the mental health and wellbeing of their families.

Last updated on hub: 28 September 2020

Emerging evidence: coronavirus and children and young people's mental health: issue 3

Evidence Based Practice Unit

A rapid review of the evidence on the key mental health challenges for children and young people during the Covid-19 pandemic, and how parents, carers, and professionals can help them to manage and minimise these challenges. It is the third of a series of reviews and captures research identified between 25th May and 14th June 2020. Key mental health challenges for children and young people during the pandemic include: mental health difficulties such as anxiety and depression have markedly increased; feelings of panic, stress, fear and fatigue amid uncertainty and a lack of control among young people are also widespread; disruption to young people’s ‘sense of control’ and ‘sense of meaning’ has contributed to growing stress and anxiety; concerns about returning to schools and colleges are also common; family dynamics, learning and education, financial stressors, social isolation and loneliness are all stressors contributing to poor mental health during the pandemic. For some, the pandemic has had positive mental health impacts due to a sense of support and potentially reduced stressors, such as social pressures at school.

Last updated on hub: 28 September 2020

End of life care

Skills for Care

During the current COVID-19 pandemic, health and social care workers who may not be specialists in this area are now finding themselves caring for someone at the end of their life. This webinar – supported by Hospice UK and Dying Matters – explores advance care planning, care in the final days and care after death.

Last updated on hub: 29 June 2020

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