COVID-19 resources for managers and leaders

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Covid-19: understanding inequalities in mental health during the pandemic

Centre for Mental Health

This briefing paper explores the mental health inequalities that are associated with the COVID-19 pandemic in the UK. It finds that the virus and the lockdown are putting greater pressure on groups and communities whose mental health was already poorer and more precarious. These include people living with mental health problems, whose access to services has been interrupted; people who live with both mental health problems and long term physical conditions that put them at greater risk of the virus; older adults who are both susceptible to the virus themselves and much more likely than others to lose partners and peers; women and children exposed to trauma and violence at home during lockdown; and people from the ethnic groups where the prevalence of COVID-19 has been highest and outcomes have been the worst, notably people from Black British, Black African, Bangladeshi and Pakistani backgrounds. The paper calls on the Government to take urgent action to address race inequality in mental health, including the urgent need for funding for organisations working in communities that have been affected most deeply by the pandemic. It calls for action to ensure people with mental health problems have access to food and medicine as well as continued financial safety-nets for those at greatest risk from the virus. And it calls for longer term action, including to build on the positive steps that have already been taken to prevent homelessness and improve the benefits system.

Last updated on hub: 29 June 2020

Life after lockdown: tackling loneliness among those left behind

British Red Cross

This report draws on findings from a collection of national-level polling, interviews and evaluations from British Red Cross services during COVID-19 to shed a light on how to refocus efforts on tackling loneliness and supporting those most affected by the crisis. Key findings include: there has been a significant increase in the number of people feeling lonely – since lockdown 41 per cent of UK adults report feeling lonelier; more than a quarter of UK adults agree that they worry something will happen to them and no one will notice; a third of UK adults haven’t had a meaningful conversation in the last week; some communities have been at greater risk of loneliness than others – people from Black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) communities, parents with young children, young people, those living with long term physical and mental health conditions, people on lower incomes and those with limited access to digital technology and the internet; COVID-19 has also meant a loss in social support for refugees and people seeking asylum. To meet the challenges ahead and ensure no one is left behind and feels alone, the report makes a number of recommendations: prioritise those most vulnerable to loneliness; secure sustained funding for tackling loneliness; continue to roll out social prescribing and ensure it delivers for loneliness; work collaboratively across sectors and specialisms, and with people with lived experience of loneliness.

Last updated on hub: 29 June 2020

Supply management: opportunities for a new landscape in children’s commissioning post crisis

Institute of Public Care

This paper considers how the commissioning of children's social care and the historic interfaces with independent providers can be transformed and redesigned to survive the aftermath of the COVID-19 challenges. Evidence from before the Coronavirus crisis indicated a need to re-examine how children’s services markets are commissioned – the dichotomy of severely financially challenged local authority children’s services budgets contrasting sharply with the apparently high profitability and returns of larger providers is a strategic dissonance. The additional impact of the pandemic will further stress councils' budgets. The paper argues that there is an opportunity to re-think the way in which the sector works together to meet the needs of children in care and to redesign the commercial interfaces to produce a more balanced and sustainable state – the twin forecasts of further increases in demand allied to funding constraints should be seen as the catalyst for these changes. The paper outlines what redesigning commissioning may entails and the actions needed with respect to supply and demand analysis and forecasting; strategy and policy; commissioner-provider relations; and commissioning partnerships. There is experience and evidence available as to how the challenge of redesigning commissioning children’s services can be addressed – and the paper includes three examples of innovative projects.

Last updated on hub: 29 June 2020

Steps to take following the death of a person who worked in adult social care in England

Department of Health and Social Care

This guidance sets out the several actions that employers may need to take in the event of the death of a worker in adult social care from coronavirus (COVID-19), regardless of professional role or employer's profile, and including volunteers. The guidance covers: contact the family; telling others at work; reporting to the Health and Safety Executive; informing the Department of Health and Social Care; informing the Care Quality Commission; supporting the family’s coronavirus life assurance scheme application; and sharing information about the coronavirus bereavement scheme. [Published 19 June 2020; Last updated 7 July 2020]

Last updated on hub: 29 June 2020

Bereavement resources for the social care workforce

Department of Health and Social Care

This guidance brings together and signposts to key resources on bereavement for social care workers and for leaders and managers. It is intended to support social care staff and providers during the COVID-19 crisis. Losing a family member, friend, colleague or care user can be devastating. This loss may be especially difficult during the pandemic because social care workers may not have been able to say goodbye in the way they would have wanted due to infection risks.

Last updated on hub: 29 June 2020

“Spend time with me”: children and young people’s experiences of COVID-19 and the justice system

Centre for Youth & Criminal Justice

This paper shares findings from research gathering the views of children and young people with experience of the justice system on COVID-19 and associated restrictions. Youth justice practitioners were also consulted, and shared practice examples as case studies. The study shows that the biggest issues facing children and young people in the justice system are isolation and lack of contact with others. Boredom, lack of activity and being stuck at home were also reported to be significant issues in complying with restrictions. This is in spite of almost all children and young people reporting they have been able to stay in touch with family and friends, and practitioners developing creative methods to sustain contact, and continue to support children, young people and their families. Particular challenges were identified with the operation of the justice system across all areas of the Whole System Approach. Some existing challenges such as delays to processes and release from custody have been exacerbated by COVID-19. A range of factors have worked in supporting children and young people: keeping in touch through creative methods; ensuring access to things to keep them occupied, practical resources and technology; working with partners; and the dedication of staff. This evidence has been used to inform the Alternative Child Rights Impact Assessment about the coronavirus, commissioned by the Children and Young People’s Commissioner Scotland.

Last updated on hub: 29 June 2020

Safe recruitment

Skills for Care

Safeguarding people who need care and support remains as important as ever. Led by Dominic Headley, one of the UK’s leading experts in safer recruitment, this webinar explores best practice emergency processes which support faster recruitment of staff during COVID-19.

Last updated on hub: 29 June 2020

An introduction to DBS checks in the social care sector

Skills for Care

This webinar – delivered by DBS – aims to improve confidence and understanding of using the Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) eligibility toolkit, the COVID-19 barred list fast track and free of charge checks and making a barring referral.

Last updated on hub: 29 June 2020

Distance recruitment

Skills for Care

Face-to-face interviews are being replaced with video calls to maintain social distancing due to COVID-19. A candidate’s experience of the recruitment process will influence their view of the employer and interest in vacancies. This webinar provides tips on effective distance recruitment.

Last updated on hub: 29 June 2020

Safe and fair recruitment guide: COVID-19 supplement

Skills for Care

This COVID-19 supplement to SfC Safe and fair recruitment guide aims to help employers follow a clear process when recruiting social care workers, key staff and volunteers for eligible roles in connection with the provision of care and treatment of COVID-19 in England and Wales, or those being recruited to backfill roles because of the impact of the pandemic (COVID-19 roles). The guidance applies to all COVID-19 roles, particularly those where employers need staff to start work rapidly, and any undue delays to the recruitment, pre-employment vetting and onboarding process could lead to risks to the continuity of service; and the safety and wellbeing of other members of staff and the people using the service. The supplement has been developed in partnership with Dominic Headley & Associates and with input from the Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) and the Care Quality Commission (CQC).

Last updated on hub: 29 June 2020