COVID-19 resources for managers and leaders

Results 241 - 250 of 375

Order by    Date Title

Commissioning during COVID-19 and beyond

Social Care Institute for Excellence

This guide focuses on what we can learn from commissioning during the COVID-19 crisis. It discusses how commissioners can work in true partnership with citizens, providers and the community to resolve issues.

Last updated on hub: 18 June 2020

Briefing on COVID-19 guidance for social care assessments and the ethical framework

Health and Social Care Alliance Scotland (the ALLIANCE)

This briefing provides insight and recommendations on how to better respect, protect and fulfil the human rights of disabled people, people who live with long term conditions and unpaid carers in relation to social care assessment and the provision of care during COVID-19. It argues that taking a human rights based approach can help difficult decision-making when there are tensions between risks and rights or between demand and available resources, calling for greater detail on equalities and explicit reference to human rights law in both UK and Scottish government guidance relating to the pandemic and local plans. The briefing makes a number of recommendations, including: monitoring the use of powers to relax social care assessments and engaging with people who access services during the pandemic and lockdown; greater clarity when social care packages are being reduced and removed; that individualised support for unpaid carers is made available; that charges for people who use social care (including collection of arrears and debt for previous care charges) should be suspended; that actions should be taken to mitigate the risks of associated with remote social care assessments. The briefing finally recommends regular, ongoing contact with social work professionals and others capable of carrying out partial assessments, using the communication methods that work best for the individual.

Last updated on hub: 18 June 2020

The mental health effects of the first two months of lockdown and social distancing during the Covid-19 pandemic in the UK

Institute of Fiscal Studies

Mental health in the UK worsened substantially as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic – by 8.1% on average and by much more for young adults and for women which are groups that already had lower levels of mental health before Covid-19. Hence inequalities in mental health have been increased by the pandemic. Even larger average effects are observed for measures of mental health that capture the number problems reported or the fraction of the population reporting any frequent or severe problems, which more than doubled for some groups such as young women. It is important to control for pre-existing recent trends in mental health when attempting to understand and isolate the effects of Covid-19.

Last updated on hub: 17 June 2020

Learning from staff experiences of Covid-19: let the light come streaming in

King's Fund

Draws the lessons from health and social care staff experiences of Covid-19. It argues that the past few months have taught us that staff must have autonomy and control, feel a greater sense of belonging and be supported in order to have a sense of competence, rather than simply being overwhelmed by excessive workload.

Last updated on hub: 17 June 2020

Rapid review: supervision

What Works Centre for Children's Social Care

A review of the literature on how supervision in child and family social work can be managed virtually and on the resulting implications for social workers, managers, children and families. Virtual supervision in social work is a relatively new and unfamiliar concept but the current COVID-19 pandemic has meant that it is now increasingly used as social work teams adapt. Behavioural science literature on virtual communications offers key insights, some of which are applicable to the context of virtual supervision, which include: management style matters (transformational leadership that motivates the workforce and generate new ideas); paying attention to building trust in a virtual setting; there may be gains to creative brainstorming – ideas and creative responses are generated more frequently in a virtual team setting, perhaps due to the less personal context; confirmation bias – the tendency to favour information that confirms one’s own values and beliefs – can be greater in virtual settings. The evidence appears to identify a number of approaches, actions and leadership styles that can promote effectiveness in virtual supervision. These include: encouraging the inclusion of preference-challenging information and structured conflict in decision-making; holding case discussions separate from the action-orientated, decision-making part of supervision to help find consensus on solutions; promoting employees’ competence, autonomy and relatedness; exploring opportunities for maintaining informal forms of supervision and ‘weak ties’ that could be lost in a virtual setting; and promoting trust.

Last updated on hub: 17 June 2020

COVID-19 and inequalities

Institute of Fiscal Studies

This report brings together what has emerged so far about the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on inequalities across several key domains of life. It provides an overview of the state of inequalities before the pandemic; examines how the pandemic interacts with existing inequalities, particularly in relation to sector shutdowns, working from home and key workers, families with children, school closures, health risks and vulnerable people; and considers the implications for future inequalities. The study finds that the nature of the economic shock associated with the pandemic has interacted with many old inequalities, with young people and BAME groups being particularly affected. In addition, some ethnic minority groups have had higher death rates than the rest of the population. The report also highlights some opportunities resulting for examples from an expansion of remote working and changes in attitudes toward the welfare system, which may contribute to address and reduce some of the current inequalities.

Last updated on hub: 16 June 2020

Realising the true value of integrated care: beyond COVID-19

International Foundation for Integrated Care

Drawing on the learning from the COVID-19 pandemic, this think piece makes the case for accelerating health and care integration to realise its true value and full potential. It argues that the speed and scale of the response required by the COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted how the fragmentation in current health and care systems significantly impairs the services' ability to respond effectively. Redesigning the system around integration requires collective action in a number of areas, which need to be strengthened and consolidated. These include: developing shared values and vision; focusing on population health and local context; working with people as partners in care; developing resilient communities and new alliances; increasing workforce capacity and capability; supporting system wide governance and leadership; investing on digital solutions; aligning payment systems; and pursuing transparency of progress, results and impact.

Last updated on hub: 16 June 2020

10 leaps forward: innovation in the pandemic. What we want to keep from this experience: going ‘back to better’

London South Bank University

An analysis of the findings of an online survey asking leaders and clinicians to reflect and play back in their own words the most important transformations that have happened due to COVID-19. The findings show that in a very short time healthcare services have learned to operate as a highly performing system and made significant advances. These include: staff being properly valued and supported; using 21st century tools; working with connected, visible, engaged leaders; care basics and inefficiencies have been fixed and sorted; local health systems have joined up together to get things done; staff working together as real teams; staff have stepped up and acted with professionalism and autonomy. As a result, the healthcare system is now better placed to make decisions based on needs and think pro-actively; to make mutual decisions with patients as partners; and to work in close collaboration with its community.

Last updated on hub: 16 June 2020

The impact of the coronavirus pandemic on child welfare: domestic abuse

National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children

This briefing uses insight from NSPCC helpline contacts and Childline counselling sessions to highlight the impact of domestic abuse on children and young people during the coronavirus pandemic. Domestic abuse is any type of controlling, bullying, threatening or violent behaviour between people who are, or have been, in a relationship. Between 23 March and 17 May 2020 the NSPCC helpline received 1,500 contacts from adults worried about the impact of domestic abuse on children, and Childline delivered over 500 counselling sessions to children and young people who were worried about domestic abuse. The key themes of these contacts include: reduced access to support networks; and lockdown bringing domestic abuse into sharp focus – making it harder to speak out, making it more difficult to leave, drinking during lockdown, exploiting fears about the coronavirus, young people worried about other family members.

Last updated on hub: 16 June 2020

Coronavirus briefing: safeguarding guidance and information for schools

National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children

This briefing summarises the latest guidance for UK schools on safeguarding during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. It pulls together key safeguarding guidance from all four UK nations on how to keep children safe during the pandemic. It answers frequently asked questions including: who has to go to school; how to monitor attendance; what happens if nominated child protection leads need to self-isolate or become ill; what schools should do about free school meals; and what happens with families who have contract arrangements or where parents are separated.

Last updated on hub: 16 June 2020