COVID-19 resources for managers and leaders

Results 41 - 50 of 462

NHS Reset: a new direction for health and care

NHS Confederation

This report summarises the insights from an engagement exercise with health and care stakeholders, including a survey of more than 250 leaders from across the NHS, as part of NHS Reset, an NHS Confederation campaign to help reset the way the system plans, commissions and delivers health and care in the aftermath of the Covid-19. The report focuses on the key challenges that the health and care system faces, including: health inequalities; the health and care workforce; funding and capacity; integration and system working; letting local leaders lead; and social care. In relation to the latter, the report argues that ensuring the effective functioning of the NHS will require a reform of social care, including stable and adequate funding, a social care long term plan that runs parallel to and supports the NHS Long Term Plan, a well-resourced and trained workforce, and outcomes-based commissioning. The report posits that five factors will be fundamental to achieving a sustainable health and care system. These are: honesty and realism – government investment to support new ways of working that will enable it to fully and safely restore services, as well as the understanding of the public while services adjust and deal with a large backlog of patients needing care; extra funding; a lighter, leaner culture – empowering local leaders and clinicians to adopt more agile ways of working; integrating health and care; and tackling health inequalities – through a radical and conscious shift towards a strategy based on population health.

Last updated on hub: 01 October 2020

A care-led recovery from Coronavirus: the case for investment in care as a better post-pandemic economic stimulus than investment in construction

Women’s Budget Group

This briefing sets out why much-needed investment in care would promote employment, reduce the gender employment gap and would be a first step in building a resilient, sustainable and more equal economy. It argues that the Covid-19 pandemic has catalysed a revaluation of care, health and employment structures, exposing pre-existing problems, creating an opportunity for transformative change and an economic stimulus that focuses on care. The report finds that investment in care has the potential to mitigate the worst employment effects of the Coronavirus recession. Specifically, investing in care would creates 2.7 times as many jobs as the same investment in construction – 6.3 as many for women and 10% more for men; increasing the numbers working in care to 10% of the employed population, as in Sweden and Denmark, and giving all care workers a pay rise to the real living wage would create 2 million jobs, increasing overall employment rates by 5% points and decreasing the gender employment gap by 4% points; 50% more can be recouped by the Treasury in direct and indirect tax revenue from investment in care than in construction; and investment in care is greener than in construction, producing 30% less greenhouse gas emissions – a care-led recovery is a green led recovery.

Last updated on hub: 30 September 2020

Health as the new wealth: the NHS’s role in economic and social recovery

NHS Confederation

This report looks beyond the immediate health response to COVID-19 to understand where and how the NHS is actively supporting the nation’s critical economic and social recovery. While the role of health in economic development has traditionally been peripheral at best, one consequence of COVID-19 is that it will likely form a more important and explicit part of national and local rebuilding. In many ways, health can be seen as the ‘new wealth’. The report outlines a five-point plan for every system to build on to maximise their local impact and influence and showcases innovative practice which is supporting lasting local change. The five-point plan identifies steps that the NHS can take in every local economy, which include: developing an anchor network across all health and care bodies within the system footprint; making an explicit commitment to fill existing health and care vacancies with local people; embedding health and care within national and local regeneration planning; proposing a Civic Restoration Strategy, focused on improving the vibrancy of communities; and convening industry leaders to source potential new local supply chains. The report also makes recommendations for national government and systems to support this work.

Last updated on hub: 30 September 2020

Lockdown, lifelines and the long haul ahead: the impact of Covid-19 on food banks in the Trussell Trust network

The Trussell Trust

Findings from a research project exploring the impact of Covid-19 on food banks in the Trussell Trust network. The data shows that when the pandemic first hit, there was a significant increase in the number of people receiving support from a food bank in the network for the first time – over 50% of people using food banks at the start of the pandemic had never needed one before. In April there was an 89% increase in the number of emergency food parcels given out compared with the same month in 2019. This included a 107% increase in the number of parcels given to children, compared to the same period last year. The study forecasts that there is likely to be a significant rise in levels of destitution in the UK by the end of the year, and at least an extra 300,000 emergency food parcels are likely to be distributed by food banks in the Trussell Trust network in the last quarter of 2020 – an increase of 61% compared to the previous year. The modelling shows that – depending on factors like the strength of the economy and a second wave of Covid-19 – levels of need could be even higher. As a priority, the report calls for the Government to: protect people’s incomes by locking in the £20 uplift to Universal Credit; help people hold on to more of their benefits by suspending benefit debt deductions until a fairer approach to repayments can be introduced; and make local safety nets as strong as possible by investing £250m in local welfare assistance in England every year.

Last updated on hub: 30 September 2020

The Government's response to COVID-19: human rights implications

House of Commons

This report sets out the findings of an inquiry into the Government’s response to Covid-19, exploring the steps that needed to be taken to ensure that the measures introduced to contrast the pandemic are human rights compliant, the impact of specific measures on human rights in the UK; and how different groups would be disproportionately affected by measures taken by the Government. It seeks to inform the six-month review of the Coronavirus legislation along with any future response to a “second wave” of the virus later this year. The report begins by setting out the legislative framework in play, then focuses on the following themes and rights: human rights impact of the lockdown; health and care, including changes to social care legislation in the Coronavirus Act 2020, children’s social care and care homes; issues in relation to detention settings; access to justice; and children’s rights — the right to education and the right to family life. The report argues that the decision to reduce care provision to certain individuals is a very serious matter and that the Government must justify its reasoning for the continuation of the powers to trigger easements to social care provision. It also questions whether removing vital protections for children was a proportionate response to the challenges posed to the children’s social care system by Covid-19. Raising its concern about the very high number of deaths from Covid-19 in care homes, the report urges the Government to ensure that addressing the issue of Covid-19 related deaths in care homes is dealt with as a priority in any inquiry or review they undertake.

Last updated on hub: 29 September 2020

Potential impact of COVID-19: government policy on the adult social care workforce

Institute for Employment Studies

This report is the output of a research project to identify how government COVID-19 related policy may have impacted upon the adult social care workforce in England. The project had a particular focus on Test and Trace, and the ways in which policy changes may have enabled and incentivised the necessary behaviours of care workers. The working hypothesis has been that care workers’ behaviours are likely to be driven by a combination of commitment to those they care for, risks to themselves and their families from COVID-19 and impacts on incomes. Government policy changes were identified based on the assumed likelihood to impact on these factors. The key findings and observations include: the fragmented nature of the sector is likely to make it challenging to get information and support to the people that need it, and therefore ensure that the desired behaviour changes are happening; government guidance and measures appear to have been rushed, heavily focused on care homes and their workers, and impossible to find in one place on the internet; testing has been hard to access – this has been a disincentive to get tested, as is the fear of being unable to work if testing positive; a major concern for individuals is loss of income if having to rely on Statutory Sick Pay. The report makes recommendations for further research into the actual impact of policy on the workforce and suggestions for improving policy development, communication and implementation.

Last updated on hub: 29 September 2020

Unequal impact? Coronavirus, disability and access to services: interim report on temporary provisions in the Coronavirus Act

House of Commons

This report considers the extent to which the temporary Coronavirus Act provisions have the potential to substantially restrict or curtail important rights that disabled people rely on for their quality of life. Where local authorities’ resources are severely affected by the pandemic, temporary provisions in the Coronavirus Act can essentially replace Care Act duties with a duty to meet care and support needs only where not doing so would be a breach of an individual’s human rights. The report highlights concerns about evidence from the Local Government Association that some local authorities had taken a pre-emptive approach, triggering an easement in case it became necessary. It argues that the current process is not stringent enough to provide confidence that easements cannot be triggered for anything other than severe demand or resource issues caused by the pandemic. On balance, and subject to further guidance and increase transparency being implemented, the report accepts that the Care Act easement provisions may need to remain in place over the winter period. However, it argues that these provisions must not remain available in statute for any longer than is strictly necessary and must not become new norms, setting back disabled people’s rights by many years.

Last updated on hub: 29 September 2020

Covid-19 and the health and care workforce: supporting our greatest asset

NHS Confederation

This report sets out what employers in health and care say they need from different levels of the system, to enable them to work with local partners to attract, recruit, train, develop, deploy and support their workforce. The report highlights how the pandemic has brought about a renewed focus on its people, creating a great deal of positive action across the sector to support staff, which now needs to become business as usual. It recognises that employers need to continue to ensure that people are at centre stage of all decision-making and that deep-rooted problems with inequality and discrimination in our workplaces are addressed. It also highlights the importance health care providers attach to looking at the workforce issues across health and social care, not just the NHS. The report calls for action in three priority areas: workforce inequality; staff experience; and workforce supply. It then identifies four practical steps for government and national organisations to consider, to help address these priority areas. These are: provide funding to run more student placements, especially in mental health, learning disability and smaller professions; continue investment made in staff mental health and wellbeing services to supplement local offers; run a national recruitment campaign for health and social care; and ensure that any pay award for NHS staff is properly funded with additional investment and does not require reductions in other NHS budgets.

Last updated on hub: 29 September 2020

Pandemic patient experience: UK patient experience of health, care and other support during the COVID-19 pandemic

Patients Association

This is a report based on the findings from a survey to capture how patients and others are experiencing health and care services during the COVID-19 pandemic. The survey had four sections: managing and accessing care for existing health condition(s); experience of treatment and care for COVID-19; experience of end of life care and bereavement support; and experience of services under lockdown overall. It ran from May until August, and around 953 people responded to at least one section of the survey. The findings show that 67% of respondents had had health and care appointments cancelled as a result of the pandemic. Those who had had the virus at some point reported they had good experiences in the circumstances, but that they didn’t always have access to the support and information they needed, especially from GPs, and sometimes from the NHS111 telephone line. Some of those who had experienced a bereavement during lockdown spoke of the compassionate care and support they received but also reported some clear examples of failings in services and people were not always able to stay in contact with their loved one at the end of life. About half of respondents did not feel generally supported emotionally when receiving health and care services; and felt they had to wait to long, were not able to access the right services and said their care had not been well co-ordinated. The report identifies a set of principles for ensuring all patients, disabled people, carers and others are able to have the best possible experience, including: recognise from the outset that the impact of the crisis will fall hardest on those who already face discrimination and inequality; and maintain the principles and values of patient choice, shared decision making and voice.

Last updated on hub: 29 September 2020

Sustaining intergenerational connections at a time of crisis: stories of resilience, adaptability and hope from people of all ages at a time when we need them most

Clarion Housing Group

This report gives a snapshot of how intergenerational relationships have been affected by the Covid-19 crisis and examines the role of the UK housing sector in strengthening intergenerational bonds in communities in the next phase of the pandemic. The report explores the innovation, compassion and flexibility that can be found across housing and intergenerational organisations with a collection of case studies of ways in which people of all ages are connecting despite the challenging circumstances. It goes on to share some perspectives from individuals, both in communities and from the sector, on the past few months. Finally, it offers some ideas for how the housing sector can contribute to building intergenerationally connected communities that are resilient through times of change and crisis.

Last updated on hub: 29 September 2020