COVID-19 resources for managers and leaders

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Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic: information for providers

Care Quality Commission

The Care Quality Commission (CQC) dedicated page for providers to keep up to date. Includes notifications, information about registration and running a service and providing care during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic.

Last updated on hub: 02 September 2020

Personal protective equipment (PPE): care workers delivering homecare during the Covid-19 response

Healthcare Safety Investigation Branch

This national intelligence report provides insight into a current safety risk that the Healthcare Safety Investigation Branch (HSIB) has identified, relating to the use of personal protective equipment (PPE) by care workers when visiting a patient at home. It documents how concerns raised by HSIB were responded to by Public Health England, the body responsible for the development of guidelines for the appropriate use of PPE. The report finds that there are multiple Covid-19 guidelines for different care sectors. PPE guidelines should be used in conjunction with other guidelines, such as infection control guidelines, so that care providers can develop protocols for care delivery. This is challenging when guidelines are updated, or new guidelines are issued and there is a risk that guidance may be missed. The report argues that there is an opportunity to introduce a document management system for guidelines to ensure that the latest information is available. This would involve the design of a usable navigation system so that all related guidelines relevant to a particular care sector are visible and can be checked for completeness.

Last updated on hub: 01 September 2020

Telephone befriending: a valuable service during lockdown

Healthwatch Enfield

This report gives a brief overview of the telephone befriending scheme set up in the London Borough of Enfield during the Coronavirus pandemic and a snapshot of issues raised by residents identified as being vulnerable or at risk. Overall, Healthwatch Enfield volunteers made 413 telephone befriending calls during this period. The main issue raised by participants was the impact of social isolation on health and wellbeing including mental health issues, with those residents with ongoing health needs being particularly concerned. Recipients appreciated food parcels and medicines delivery but also valued the support of family and neighbours. Most of the recipients were pleased to receive the calls and a core continued to receive these throughout the period. The report suggests that the scheme should be continued if people request it, with established organisations being asked to support the calls. If or when a second wave arises, arrangements should be made to re-establish the full service.

Last updated on hub: 01 September 2020

West Midlands inquiry into COVID-19 fatalities in the BAME community

COVID-19 BAME Evidence Gathering Taskforce

Findings from the Labour Party-led COVID-19 BAME Evidence Gathering Taskforce, which was established to gather the evidence on the impact of Covid-19 on black and minority ethnic communities in the West Midlands. The report indicates that men and women in the black community have been over four times more likely to die from Covid-19 than white people (4.2 and 4.3 times respectively). Men of Bangladeshi and Pakistani origin were 3.6 times more likely to have a Covid-19 related death, while the figure for women was 3.4 times more likely. Key findings include: fear of inequitable treatment that might be received in the NHS was a deterrent for many in the BAME asking for help quickly enough; the BAME community experienced an NHS and care system that was overwhelmed, despite the heroism of our frontline NHS workers, many of whom were themselves from the BAME community; public health messages about symptoms or what to do when in need were poorly communicated to BAME communities; the voice of the BAME community has not been heard in the way the health services are designed and delivered; many BAME frontline workers had direct experience of inadequate provision of PPE with some having to make protective equipment themselves; a clear strategy for understanding the scientific evidence for the disproportionate impact of Covid-19 on the BAME community has not been communicated effectively. The report makes a number of recommendations and calls on the Government to commence a formal judge-led independent public inquiry into the Covid-19 fatalities in the BAME community and to consult with BAME communities on both the Chair and the Terms of Reference.

Last updated on hub: 01 September 2020

Vulnerable children and young people survey: summary of returns waves 1 to 8

Department for Education

Summary of local authority survey in England to help understand the impact of the coronavirus (Covid-19) outbreak on children’s social care. The analysis in the survey covers: contact with children supported by the local authority children’s social care; children’s social care workforce; cost pressures; and system pressures. The analysis reveals that the majority of children looked after, children on a child protection plan and other children in need have had their cases reviewed in light of the outbreak (89%, 91% and 86% respectively); the proportion of social workers not working due to the pandemic has remained stable across the time period, with between 87% and 89% of local authorities reporting between 0 to 10% of social workers unavailable due to coronavirus; just over three quarters of local authorities have reported a rise in foster and residential placements costs due to the pandemic; in Wave 4 the average number of referrals to children’s social care services per local authority was 12% lower than the same period over the previous three years – this compares to 22% lower in Wave 3; the total number of referrals reported in Waves 1 to 4 of the survey was 41,190 – this is around 18% lower than the same period over the past three years; the total number of children who have started to be looked after reported in Waves 1 to 4 of the survey was 1,640 – this is around 34% lower than the same period over the past three years.

Last updated on hub: 01 September 2020

Children’s social care: Government consultation response

Department for Education

Sets out the Government’s response to a consultation seeking views on proposed changes to the Adoption and Children (Coronavirus) (Amendment) Regulations 2020. These are intended to provide flexibilities to support the effective delivery of children’s social care services, whilst ensuring children’s safety. A majority of responses were in favour of each of the proposals to extend individual regulations on medical reports, virtual visits, and the continued suspension of the regular cycle of Ofsted inspections of children’s services providers. The majority of responses also agreed that all other temporary flexibilities introduced in April 2020 should lapse and the need to introduce additional safeguards. However, many consultees also raised concerns in the way the regulations were introduced, and many felt the regulations should not be extended and should be revoked immediately. On the basis of responses to the consultation the Government has decided to continue with plans to allow the majority of regulations to lapse on 25 September, save those specifically set out in this document, on medical assessments, virtual visits and Ofsted inspections. The Government has no plans to extend the regulations beyond March 2021.

Last updated on hub: 01 September 2020

Evaluating the importance of scale in proposals for local government reorganisation

Pricewaterhouse Coopers LLP

The purpose of this report is to consider the importance of scale in proposals for local government reorganisation. Throughout the report, the implications for the organisation and delivery of children and adults’ social care services are discussed. The report identifies considerations relating to the costs associated with disaggregation; what this might mean in terms of risk and resilience of service provision; how service performance might be impacted; what it could mean for the place agenda; and issues arising from the response to Covid-19. It also sets out the financial implications of four unitary scenarios: establishing one unitary authority in every two-tier area in England; establishing two new unitary authorities in every two-tier area in England; establishing three new unitary authorities in every two-tier area in England; and establishing two new unitary authorities and a children’s trust in every two-tier area in England.

Last updated on hub: 01 September 2020

Guidance for supporting vulnerable and disadvantaged learners

Welsh Government

This guidance provides specific advice for supporting vulnerable and disadvantaged learners returning to school setting in Wales. A wide definition of vulnerable and disadvantaged learners has been adopted, including learners who are in one or more of the following groups: learners with special educational needs (SEN); learners from minority ethnic groups who have English or Welsh as an additional language (EAL/WAL); care-experienced children, including looked after children; learners educated other than at school (EOTAS); children of refugees and asylum seekers; Gypsy, Roma and Traveller children; learners eligible for free school meals (eFSM); young carers; and children at risk of harm, abuse or neglect. The guidance covers: the legislative background; preparing an approach from September 2020; and preparing for a further lockdown or blended learning approach.

Last updated on hub: 27 August 2020

The experience of care home staff during Covid-19: a survey report by the QNI’s International Community Nursing Observatory

The Queen's Nursing Institute

Findings of a survey a survey to understand more about the impact of Covid-19 on the care home nurse workforce within the UK. The survey was distributed online via the QNI Care Home Nurse Network (n~400 members), ranging from staff delivering care directly to residents, to leaders overseeing several homes. There was a total of 163 responses to the survey, equating to a response rate of 41%. The analysis shows that for the majority of respondents working through the pandemic resulted in very negative experiences such as not being valued, poor terms and conditions of employment, feeling unsupported/blamed for deaths, colleagues in other areas refusing help, feeling pressured to take residents from hospitals with unknown Covid-19 status and lack of clear guidance. 66% of respondents reported always having appropriate PPE and 75% reported that their employer had provided all their PPE. During March and April 2020, 21% reported receiving residents from the hospital sector who had tested positive for Covid-19 in hospital and 43% reported receiving residents from the hospital with an unknown Covid-19 status. Being able to access other services was an issue for some respondents. A significant proportion of respondents reported it was somewhat difficult or very difficult to access hospital care, GP services, District Nursing services, end of life medication/services. 56% of respondents felt worse or much worse in terms of their physical and mental wellbeing, while 36% reported no change. Only 62 respondents stated that they could take time off with full pay, while some felt pressure not to take time off at all.

Last updated on hub: 27 August 2020

COVID-19 and the female health and care workforce: survey of health and care staff for the Health and Care Women Leaders Network, August 2020

NHS Confederation

This report sets out the findings of a survey to understand the impact the Covid-19 pandemic has had on women working across health and care services. A total of 1,308 women responded to the survey. While the overwhelming majority of respondents to the survey were white, there were some key differences in the findings in relation to participants from black and minority ethnic (BME) backgrounds. The survey found that most respondents – almost three-quarters – had reported that their job had a greater negative impact than usual on their emotional wellbeing as a result of the pandemic, and more than half had suffered a negative impact on their physical health. Staff from BME backgrounds also reported feeling traumatised by the disproportionate impact of the virus, compounded by concerns over risk assessments not being performed in a timely manner, if at all. In addition, the analysis shows that PPE availability and training have been broadly adequate, but could be stronger; managerial support has been strong, but some issues emerge over sharing concerns; struggles with work-life balance since lockdown started; some respondents had safety concerns when working from home. The report also draws out some of the positive experiences, such as opportunities for learning and the strength of support many have received from their managers. Recommendations to improve the working conditions for women in health and care services are included.

Last updated on hub: 27 August 2020