COVID-19 resources on care homes

Results 1 - 10 of 100

Order by    Date Title

The safe use of medication during the COVID-19 pandemic

Scottish Social Services Council

A guide for social care workers supporting people at home or in a care home. It offers support, information and resources for social care workers who have the responsibility to carry out one or more of the following types of support: prompt – remind someone to take their medication using their preferred communication method; assist – help someone who manages their own medication with physical tasks like opening bottles, at their request; administer medication – prepare the right medication, at the right time and support a person to take it in the right way in line with their care or support plan and advice from the prescriber or pharmacist.

Last updated on hub: 18 September 2020

Cohorting, zoning and isolation practice: commissioning for resilient care home provision: a report to the Social Care Sector COVID-19 Task Force

Care England

Guidance on developing good practice in cohorting, zoning and isolation practice in care home settings as a means of ensuring the effective implementation of the Public Health England (PHE) national guidance and high standards of infection prevention and control. Various examples and documents already exist which exemplify notable practice and provide national guidance. This document brings some of this together to address particular questions for the Task Force. As well as providing advice to the Task Force, it might also act as a checklist for commissioners to assess what they have already done / might do. It is split as follows: context; some key principles to guide work in this area; describing good practice in cohorting – within existing provision, or in dedicated facilities; what this means for commissioners and how they work with care providers recognising the critical relationships between them; resource considerations; and practice examples and references.

Last updated on hub: 17 September 2020

Care home infection control top tips

North West Association of Directors of Adult Social Services

The purpose of this guide is to highlight some of the ways in which residential and nursing homes have responded to the Covid-19 pandemic in order to ensure that residents are safe, needs continue to be met and wellbeing is promoted, in what are very challenging and difficult circumstances. This guide has been compiled from desktop review of policy and best practice guidance, together with interviews with a selection of providers and commissioners from across the North West region. It aims to stimulate ideas on how providers and commissioners can develop and enhance services in the context of Covid-19, whilst simultaneously building future resilience into providers existing infection control plans. Topics covered include: the physical environment; staff; wellbeing; processes; and technology.

Last updated on hub: 17 September 2020

COVID-19 mortality and long-term care: a UK comparison

International Long-term Care Policy Network

This article reviews the path of the COVID-19 pandemic across the UK long-term care (LTC) sector, indicating how it evolved in each of the four home nations. It prefaces this with a description of LTC across the UK, its history and the difficulties encountered in establishing a satisfactory policy for the care of frail older people across the home nations. The analysis indicates that throughout the pandemic, 54,510 COVID-19 related deaths were registered in the UK, across all age groups and all locations of death. Of these, 17,127 (31%) occurred within care homes and at least 21,775 (40%) were accounted for by care home residents. In terms of excess deaths (measured against the average weekly deaths during the previous 5-year period) during the pandemic England had a 38% increase in mortality compared with 29% in Scotland, 22% in Wales, and 20% in Northern Ireland. England is the only UK nation that has released COVID-19 mortality data on those receiving care at home. That data show that throughout the pandemic period there were a large number of excess deaths in the domiciliary setting. The majority of which were not recorded as being COVID-19 related. Overall, the English data demonstrate that, compared to care homes, the overall proportional increase in deaths was greater in the domiciliary setting.

Last updated on hub: 10 September 2020

COVID-19: what people are telling us: a summary, April-June 2020

Healthwatch England

This report provides NHS and social care leaders with a summary of key issues the public faced because of the COVID-19 pandemic, and how this affected their experiences using health and social care. The feedback covers primary care; secondary and urgent care; mental health services; social care; and community and other services – including patient transport, equipment services and charitable or voluntary services such as the National NHS Responder Scheme. This report covers the period April–June 2020 and is informed by 19,717 people’s experiences of care. In relation to social care, people raised concerns about access to testing and PPE in care home settings, as well as for home care workers and informal carers. People’s feedback highlighted that while family and friends were unable to visit their loved ones in care homes, timely and regular communication from care home staff really mattered – especially surrounding discussions about advance care planning or if the resident was approaching the end of their life. In addition, families and carers have faced huge challenges due to the closure of respite and day centre services during this time. The report finds that factors such as loneliness and social isolation, bereavement, employment and financial stress, and anxiety about both COVID-19 and other health conditions have all had a negative impact. There has been an increase in positive experiences of urgent and emergency care services – with the amount of positive feedback increasing to 45%, compared to 36% last quarter. Only 22% of respondents reported positive experience of social care services while 46% said they had a negative experience.

Last updated on hub: 10 September 2020

Visits to care homes: guidance for providers

Welsh Government

This guidance provides advice for care home providers on facilitating outdoor visits; indoor visits when the level of COVID-19 at a local or national level allows; indoor visits in exceptional circumstances including end of life; and people going out into the community and visiting family and friends. The guidance sets out an ethical framework to support people living and staying in care homes to reconnect safely with families, friends and professionals, consistent with the requirements of the wider coronavirus restrictions. The ultimate decision on whether, and in what circumstances care home visits take place rests with the individual provider, and some providers will find it more challenging to facilitate visits than others. However, this guidance is intended to support providers to enable visits to take place, and providers are expected and encouraged to facilitate visits wherever possible.

Last updated on hub: 08 September 2020

The rapid learning initiative into the transmission of COVID-19 into and within care homes in Northern Ireland

Northern Ireland. Department of Health

This report provides the findings of the Rapid Learning Initiative with regards to the transmission of Covid-19 into and within care homes during the first surge of the pandemic, and makes recommendations on the way forward prior to further potential surges of infection. It details the findings of each of the four sub-groups, which considered: the experience of residents, families and staff; symptom monitoring, interventions and testing; infection prevention and control; and physical distancing, reduced footfall and restricted visiting. The initiative identified three overarching structures and processes that will need to be established to support the delivery of outcomes and bring about a learning system that works across Heath and Social Care (HSCNI), including the independent sector and Trusts: at strategic level, the collaborative partnerships established for the purposes of the Initiative should continue and develop further to support future development of Strategy and Policy; a regional learning system should be developed and include key quality indicators for Care Homes (led by frontline staff) using real-time data that can for continuous improvement; and a quality improvement learning system should include building the capability and capacity within Care Home staff to use continuous improvement methodologies to implement operational improvement as a system.

Last updated on hub: 07 September 2020

Case studies

Care Home Professional

Brings together innovative examples of good practice in care homes. They case studies cover a range of topics, including responses to Covid-19; quality of care; the use of technology; social activities and entertainment; and helping residents stay connected.

Last updated on hub: 07 September 2020

What you need to know when visiting a care home (new guidance for COVID-19)

Healthwatch England

A breakdown of current guidance on visiting care homes during coronavirus. It addresses key aspects and questions, including: when to to visit a care home; what advice to expect; whether a test is required to be able to visit my relative; how to travel to the care home; what is likely to change when visiting a loved one; how many people can visit a care home at a time; what happens if there is an outbreak at the care home; and what happens if there is a local lockdown.

Last updated on hub: 03 September 2020

Covid-19 infection and attributable mortality in UK long term care facilities: cohort study using active surveillance and electronic records (March-June 2020)

medRxiv

This article is a preprint and has not been peer-reviewed. The lead researcher was Peter F Dutey-Magni. Background: Rates of Covid-19 infection have declined in many countries, but outbreaks persist in residents of long-term care facilities (LTCFs) who are at high risk of severe outcomes. Epidemiological data from LTCFs are scarce. This study used population-level active surveillance to estimate incidence of, and risk factors for Covid-19, and attributable mortality in elderly residents of LTCFs. Methods: Cohort study using individual-level electronic health records from 8,713 residents and daily counts of infection for 9,339 residents and 11,604 staff across 179 UK LTCFs. This study modelled risk factors for infection and mortality using Cox proportional hazards and estimated attributable fractions. Findings: 2,075/9,339 residents developed Covid-19 symptoms (22.2% [95% confidence interval: 21.4%; 23.1%]), while 951 residents (10.2% [9.6%; 10.8%]) and 585 staff (5.0% [4.7%; 5.5%]) had laboratory confirmed infections. Confirmed infection incidence in residents and staff respectively was 152.6 [143.1; 162.6] and 62.3 [57.3; 67.5] per 100,000 person-days. 121/179 (67.6%) LTCFs had at least one Covid-19 infection or death. Lower staffing ratios and higher occupancy rates were independent risk factors for infection. 1,694 all-cause deaths occurred in 8,713 (19.4% [18.6%; 20.3%]) residents. 217 deaths occurred in 607 residents with confirmed infection (case-fatality rate: 35.7% [31.9%; 39.7%]). 567/1694 (33.5%) of all-cause deaths were attributable to Covid-19, 28.0% of which occurred in residents with laboratory-confirmed infection. The remainder of excess deaths occurred in asymptomatic or symptomatic residents in the context of limited testing for infection, suggesting substantial under-ascertainment. Interpretation: 1 in 5 residents had symptoms of infection during the pandemic, but many cases were not tested. Higher occupancy and lower staffing levels increase infection risk. Disease control measures should integrate active surveillance and testing with fundamental changes in staffing and care home occupancy to protect staff and residents from infection.

Last updated on hub: 31 August 2020