COVID-19 resources on care homes

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Achieving residential care business success: moving beyond COVID-19

CoolCare

Coming from a range of backgrounds of working and investing in residential care provision, the panellists in this webinar offer practical ideas on how residential care businesses can move through the coronavirus crisis as well sharing their views on the future of the market. The webinar provides advice and guidance on a multitude of topics, including: new care home design and layout trends to boost enquiry conversions and infection control; the power technology is having on restoring consumer confidence when placing a loved one; and new staffing processes that are been implemented to boost compliance and minimise risk.

Last updated on hub: 13 July 2020

ADASS coronavirus survey

Association of Directors of Adult Social Services

This report presents the results of a survey of the Director of Adult Social Services on the impact of Covid-19 on adult social care and councils’ response to it. It focuses in particular on the steps local authorities have taken to meet the changing social care needs in the context of the pandemic; their engagement with and support to providers; the sustainability of the care market; and the interface between the NHS and social care. Almost a quarter of all respondents said that social care need had increased, mostly as result temporary closure of services, providers’ concerns about accepting new clients and people declining services they are offered. Councils have responded to the increase in need by enhancing their information and advice offer; re-training council staff; using volunteers; increased use of digital technology and drawing capacity from other areas. The survey shows that a number of Directors believe there are insufficient primary and community services in their local areas and that around a quarter thought that more than half of care home Covid-19 infections were attributable to rapid hospital discharge (combined with a lack of PPE and testing). The report identifies four key lessons from the response to COVID-19: there has been too much emphasis on protecting the NHS at the expense of care homes; more protection for care homes was needed – including not discharging Covid-19 patients from hospital to care homes; testing before discharge and step-down facilities before care home admission; and improved supply of PPE.

Last updated on hub: 15 June 2020

ADASS rapid survey: how are local authorities supporting local social care providers to respond to Covid-19?

Association of Directors of Adult Social Services

The results of a rapid survey of Association of Directors of Adult Social Services (ADASS) members to gather data about the measures local authorities have put in place to support local social care providers during the COVID-19 outbreak. It found that 95% of responding local authorities are using a variety of payments in advance to support care providers. Of those local authorities that have taken action to address the temporary cost pressures facing providers, 97% have provided financial support to providers. The survey was carried out between 28th April to 1 May 2020 and received from 89% of local authorities with responsibility for Adult Social Care in England.

Last updated on hub: 29 May 2020

Admission and care of residents in a care home during COVID-19

Department of Health and Social Care

Government guidance setting out how to admit and care for residents of care homes safely and protect care home staff during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. It also includes information on reporting COVID-19 cases, providing care after death and supporting existing residents that may require hospital care. The guidance is intended for care homes, local health protection teams, local authorities, clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) and registered providers of accommodation for people who need personal or nursing care. This includes registered residential care and nursing homes for people with learning disabilities, mental health or other disabilities. [Published 2/04/20. Last updated 2 September 2020].

Last updated on hub: 06 April 2020

Adult social care and COVID-19: assessing the impact on social care users and staff in England so far

The Health Foundation

An overview of the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on social care in England, describing how the pandemic unfolded in the social care sector from March until June 2020, and examining the factors that contributed to the scale and severity of outbreaks in care homes. The briefing also attempts to quantify the disruption to health and social care access from February until the end of April 2020. The findings demonstrate that the pandemic has had a profound impact on people receiving and providing social care in England – since March, there have been more than 30,500 deaths among care home residents than it would be normally expected, and a further 4,500 excess deaths among people receiving care in their own homes (domiciliary care); and while deaths in care homes have now returned to average levels for this time of year, the latest data (up until 19 June) shows that there have continued to be excess deaths reported among domiciliary care users. Social care workers are among the occupational groups at highest risk of COVID-19 mortality, with care home workers and home carers accounting for the highest proportion (76%) of COVID-19 deaths within this group. The analysis also shows that there was a substantial reduction in hospital admissions among care home residents which may have helped reduce the risk of transmission but potentially increased unmet health needs. The briefing argues that long-standing structural issues have exacerbated the crisis in social care and hindered the response to the pandemic. It suggests that action is needed now to prevent further harm including by filling the gaps in data, particularly for those receiving domiciliary care, and by developing a new data strategy for social care.

Last updated on hub: 03 August 2020

Adult social care and COVID-19: assessing the policy response in England so far

The Health Foundation

An analysis of national government policies on adult social care in England related to COVID-19 between 31 January and 31 May 2020. This briefing considers the role that social care has played in the overall policy narrative and identifies the underlying factors within the social care system, such as its structure and funding, that have shaped its ability to respond. It suggests that overall, central government support for social care came too late – some initial policies targeted the social care sector in March but the government's COVID-19: adult social care action plan was not published until 15 April and another month passed before the government introduced a dedicated fund to support infection control in care homes. Protecting and strengthening social care services, and stuff, appears to have been given far lower priority by national policymakers than protecting the NHS and policy action on social care has been focused primarily on care homes and risks leaving out other vulnerable groups and services. The briefing calls on the Government to learn from the first phase of the COVID-19 response to prepare for potential future waves of the virus. Short-term actions should include greater involvement of social care in planning and decision making, improved access to regular testing and PPE, and a commitment to cover the costs of local government’s COVID-19 response. Critically, more fundamental reform of the social care system is needed to address the longstanding policy failures exacerbated by COVID-19.

Last updated on hub: 03 August 2020

Adult Social Care Infection Control Fund ring-fenced grant 2020: local authority circular

Department of Health and Social Care

Government circular outlining the Adult social care infection control fund, which aims to support adult social care providers to reduce the rate of COVID-19 transmission in and between care homes and support wider workforce resilience. A small percentage of the fund can be used to support domiciliary care providers and support wider workforce resilience to deal with COVID-19 infections. The document is accompanied by five annexes which set out the conditions upon which the grant is paid and the local authorities to whom it will be paid. [First published 9 June 2020. Last updated: 21 September 2020].

Last updated on hub: 08 June 2020

Adult social care: our COVID-19 winter plan 2020 to 2021

Department of Health and Social Care

This policy paper sets out the key elements of national support available for the social care sector for winter 2020 to 2021, as well as the main actions to take for local authorities, NHS organisations, and social care providers, including in the voluntary and community sector. It covers four themes: preventing and controlling the spread of infection in care settings; collaboration across health and care services; supporting people who receive social care, the workforce, and carers; and supporting the system. Each section sets out the Department of Health and Social Care’s offer of national support and the department’s expectations for adult social care providers alongside published guidance. The plan applies to all settings and contexts in which people receive adult social care. This includes people’s own homes, residential care homes and nursing homes, and other community settings.

Last updated on hub: 21 September 2020

Care home infection control top tips

North West Association of Directors of Adult Social Services

The purpose of this guide is to highlight some of the ways in which residential and nursing homes have responded to the Covid-19 pandemic in order to ensure that residents are safe, needs continue to be met and wellbeing is promoted, in what are very challenging and difficult circumstances. This guide has been compiled from desktop review of policy and best practice guidance, together with interviews with a selection of providers and commissioners from across the North West region. It aims to stimulate ideas on how providers and commissioners can develop and enhance services in the context of Covid-19, whilst simultaneously building future resilience into providers existing infection control plans. Topics covered include: the physical environment; staff; wellbeing; processes; and technology.

Last updated on hub: 17 September 2020

Care Home Professional case studies

Care Home Professional

The case studies landing page on the Care Home Professional website is a helpful source for identifying good practice in care homes during the current coronavirus pandemic.

Last updated on hub: 09 June 2020