COVID-19 resources on care homes

Results 31 - 40 of 100

Order by    Date Title

Coronavirus (COVID-19) testing in care homes: statistics to 8 July 2020

Department of Health and Social Care

Latest figures on coronavirus testing for social care staff, their household members and residents of care homes. As of 8 July, there had been an estimated 741,021 tests on workers in the UK in social care settings and their symptomatic household members for COVID-19 through Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) testing routes. There have been an estimated 352,946 tests on care home residents for COVID-19 through DHSC testing routes in the UK. An estimated 100,900 care home residents in England had been tested for COVID-19 through PHE testing routes.

Last updated on hub: 21 July 2020

Risk factors for COVID-19 versus non-COVID-19 related in-hospital and community deaths by Local Authority District in Great Britain

medRxiv

This article is a preprint and has not been peer-reviewed. The lead researcher is Samuel Paul Leighton. Objectives: To undertake a preliminary hypothesis-generating analysis exploring putative risk factors for coronavirus diseae 2019 (COVID-19) population-adjusted deaths, compared with non-COVID-19 related deaths, at a local authority district (LAD) level in hospital, care homes and at home. Results: Significant risk factors for LAD COVID-19 death in comparison to non-COVID-19 related death were air pollution and proportion of the population who were female. Significant protective factors were higher air temperature and proportion of the population who were ex-smokers. Scottish local authorities and local authorities with a higher proportion of individuals of BAME origin are potential risk factors for COVID-19 related deaths in care homes and in hospitals, respectively.

Last updated on hub: 15 July 2020

Evolution and impact of COVID-19 outbreaks in care homes: population analysis in 189 care homes in one geographic region

medRxiv

This article is a preprint and has not been peer-reviewed. The lead researcher is Jennifer K Burton. Method: Analysis of testing, cases and deaths using linked care-home, testing and mortality data for 189 care-homes with 5843 beds in a large Scottish Health Board up to 15/06/20. Findings: 70 (37.0%) of care-homes experienced a COVID-19 outbreak.Interpretation: The large impact on excess deaths appears to be primarily a direct effect of COVID-19, with cases and deaths are concentrated in a minority of care homes. A key implication is that there is a large pool of susceptible residents if community COVID-19 incidence increases again. Shielding residents from potential sources of infection and rapid action into minimise outbreak size where infection is introduced will be critical in any wave 2.

Last updated on hub: 15 July 2020

Care homes analysis

Department of Health and Social Care

This paper provides an assessment of evidence on care homes, including optimal approaches to testing, and the potential value of other protection approaches. It reveals that some local authorities (i.e. Liverpool, Oxfordshire) have suffered higher numbers of outbreaks than might have been expected given the number of care homes locally. Nursing home have consistently higher rates of reporting outbreaks than care homes. Both residential and nursing homes show an increase as home size increases. Examining the effectiveness of approaches to reducing rates of infection, the paper stresses that testing can only support reduction of infection rates if coupled with actions to reduce contacts with positive cases and infection control more generally. It acknowledges that despite the potential reduction in risk of the non-rotation of care workers, there may be multiple operational challenges to achieving this. Cohorting of residents to receive care from a small number of carers has the potential to reduce transmission through limiting contacts. If this can be implemented easily, without creating other risks, it has the potential to reduce risk of infection. As the picture is developing rapidly and, as new evidence or data emerges, some of the information in this paper may have been superseded.

Last updated on hub: 14 July 2020

Achieving residential care business success: moving beyond COVID-19

CoolCare

Coming from a range of backgrounds of working and investing in residential care provision, the panellists in this webinar offer practical ideas on how residential care businesses can move through the coronavirus crisis as well sharing their views on the future of the market. The webinar provides advice and guidance on a multitude of topics, including: new care home design and layout trends to boost enquiry conversions and infection control; the power technology is having on restoring consumer confidence when placing a loved one; and new staffing processes that are been implemented to boost compliance and minimise risk.

Last updated on hub: 13 July 2020

Coronavirus (COVID-19): adult care homes visiting guidance

Scottish Government

This guidance sets out how care home visiting in Scotland may be re-introduced while minimising the risks to residents, staff and visitors. It takes a staged approach, where stage 1 – essential visits only - has been in operation throughout the COVID-19 pandemic. The guide sets out how relaxation of visiting restrictions will take place in three further stages, moving through outdoor visiting, indoor visiting by one designated person and eventually to a controlled programme of outdoor and indoor visiting. It explains what precautions will be taken to safeguard resident, visitor and staff safety.

Last updated on hub: 09 July 2020

Care homes: outbreak testing and regular testing

Department of Health and Social Care

Sets out the next stages in the COVID-19 testing strategy for adult social care to be rolled out from 6 July. This letter to the Directors of Public Health and Directors of Adult Social Services covers outbreak management and rapid testing for care homes with outbreaks; retesting in care homes without outbreaks; extra care and supported living; and domiciliary care.

Last updated on hub: 09 July 2020

Local government and Covid-19: social care, a neglected service

Local Government Information Unit

This briefing looks at the state of the social care sector pre-pandemic and the impact that the virus has had on care homes and domiciliary care. There were over 4,000 deaths involving COVID-19 in care homes England in the two weeks up to 28 April – over four times the number recorded in residential and nursing homes up to that point and it is not clear whether the virus has yet reached its peak in this sector. The social care sector has been underfunded and under-valued by successive governments and was in a parlous state before the pandemic took hold. The briefing discusses: rates of infections and deaths in social care settings; continuing concerns about lack of adequate PPE provision to both care homes and domiciliary care providers; lack of testing for both care workers and residents/clients and what this means for the safety of social care provision; the additional costs of COVID-19 on local authorities and care providers in an already underfunded and unstable sector; and the lessons that can be learnt.

Last updated on hub: 08 July 2020

Impact of coronavirus in care homes in England: 26 May to 19 June 2020

The Office for National Statistics

Sets out the first results from the Vivaldi study, a large scale survey which looked at coronavirus (COVID-19) infections in 9,081 care homes providing care for dementia patients and the elderly in England. Across the care homes included in the study, 56% are estimated to have reported at least one confirmed case of coronavirus (staff or resident). Across these, an estimated 20% of residents and 7% of staff tested positive for COVID-19, as reported by care home managers, since the start of the pandemic. The emerging findings reveal some common factors in care homes with higher levels of infections amongst residents. These include prevalence of infection in staff, some care home practices such as more frequent use of bank or agency nurses or carers, and some regional differences (such as higher infection levels within care homes in London and the West Midlands). There is some evidence that in care homes where staff receive sick pay, there are lower levels of infection in residents. Findings also include some common factors in care homes with higher levels of infection amongst staff. These include prevalence of infection in residents (although this is weaker than the effect of staff infection on residents), some care home practices (such as more frequent use of bank or agency nurses or carers, and care homes employing staff who work across multiple sites) and some regional differences (such as higher infection levels within care homes in the North East and Yorkshire and the Humber). However, regional differences may be affected by different patterns of testing in staff and residents over time.

Last updated on hub: 07 July 2020

Leading in isolation during Covid-19

King's Fund

Lesley Flatley shares the challenges of leading an independent residential home during the pandemic and the feeling of isolation and loneliness that social care leaders may experience without the support of a large organisation like the NHS. The blog also looks at the actions and strategies they implemented to address and support the emotional and mental wellbeing of staff and residents and reflects on the lessons learned, including the role of technology.

Last updated on hub: 07 July 2020