COVID-19 resources on Dementia

Results 31 - 40 of 108

Order by    Date Title

Dementia and town planning: creating better environments for people living with dementia

Royal Town Planning Institute

This practice note gives advice on how town planning can work with other professionals to create better environments for people living with dementia. It summarises expert advice, outlines key planning policy, good practice and case studies from around the UK. It also attempts to reflect on the challenges people living with dementia, their families and carers face, as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic, along with how the built environment can be adapted to improve their safety and support them to live independently in the future. Evidence has shown that good quality housing and well-planned, enabling local environments can have a substantial impact on the quality of life of someone living with dementia, helping them to live well for longer and of course, town planning has a key role to play if health and social care policies are to succeed. The document covers: impact of the built environment; home and dementia; what a place designed for people living with dementia looks like; legislation and policy; planning for dementia; and tools and approaches to plan for people living with dementia. This revised version includes new examples of good practice, along with updated information, advice and practice. The policy context applies to England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.

Last updated on hub: 01 February 2017

Dementia in care homes and COVID-19

Social Care Institute for Excellence

Helpful quick guide about COVID-19 and people living with dementia in care homes. Produced in collaboration with NHS England and NHS Improvement.

Last updated on hub: 13 May 2020

Dementia wellbeing and COVID-19: review and expert consensus on current research and knowledge gaps

Center for Open Science

Objectives: In response to an NHS England enquiry, a UK-based working group, comprising dementia researchers from a range of fields and disciplines, aimed to describe the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on dementia wellbeing and identify priorities for future research. Methods: This study supplemented a rapid literature search (including unpublished, non-peer reviewed and ongoing studies/reports) on dementia wellbeing in the context of COVID-19 with expert group members’ consensus about future research needs. From this we generated potential research questions the expert group judged to be relevant that were not covered by the existing literature. Results: Themes emerged from 141 studies within the six domains of the NHS England COVID-19 Dementia Wellbeing Pathway: Preventing Well, Diagnosing Well, Treating Well, Supporting Well, Living Well and Dying Well. We describe current research findings and knowledge gaps relating to the impact on people affected by dementia (individuals with a diagnosis, their carers and social contacts, health and social care practitioners and volunteers), services, research activities and organisations. Broad themes included the potential benefits and risks of new models of working including remote healthcare, the need for population-representative longitudinal studies to monitor longer-term impacts, and the importance of reporting dementia-related findings within broader healthcare studies. Conclusions: The COVID-19 pandemic has had a disproportionately negative impact on people affected by dementia. Researchers and funding organisations have responded rapidly to try to understand the impacts. Future research should highlight and resolve outstanding issues to develop evidence-based measures to improve the quality of life of people affected by dementia. [Note: this article is published on a preprint server]

Last updated on hub: 28 January 2021

Dementia wellbeing and COVID-19: review and expert consensus on current research and knowledge gaps

International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry

Objectives: In response to a commissioned research update on dementia during the COVID-19 pandemic, a UK-based working group, comprising dementia researchers from a range of fields and disciplines, aimed to describe the impact of the pandemic on dementia wellbeing and identify priorities for future research. Methods: This study supplemented a rapid literature search (including unpublished, non-peer reviewed and ongoing studies/reports) on dementia wellbeing in the context of COVID-19 with expert group members' consensus about future research needs. From this, the researchers generated potential research questions the group judged to be relevant that were not covered by the existing literature. Results: Themes emerged from 141 studies within the six domains of the NHS England COVID-19 Dementia Wellbeing Pathway: Preventing Well, Diagnosing Well, Treating Well, Supporting Well, Living Well and Dying Well. This paper describes current research findings and knowledge gaps relating to the impact on people affected by dementia (individuals with a diagnosis, their carers and social contacts, health and social care practitioners and volunteers), services, research activities and organisations. Broad themes included the potential benefits and risks of new models of working including remote healthcare, the need for population-representative longitudinal studies to monitor longer-term impacts, and the importance of reporting dementia-related findings within broader health and care studies. Conclusions: The COVID-19 pandemic has had a disproportionately negative impact on people affected by dementia. Researchers and funding organisations have responded rapidly to try to understand the impacts. Future research should highlight and resolve outstanding questions to develop evidence-based measures to improve the quality of life of people affected by dementia.

Last updated on hub: 02 July 2021

Dementia wellbeing in the COVID-19 pandemic

NHS England

This document takes the wellbeing pathway for dementia and sets out the adjustments and amendments needed to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic. It covers six domains, which include: preventing well; diagnosing well; treating well; supporting well; living well; and dying well. The guide highlights key priorities and actions for each step in the pathway and provides links to further information and guidance. The guide spans community, in-patient and other health and social care settings and signposts to useful resources from a variety of organisations. This resource is primarily for clinicians working with people with dementia, but can also be used by carers and people with dementia. A resource section for people with dementia and their carers is also included.

Last updated on hub: 29 September 2020

Detrimental effects of confinement and isolation on the cognitive and psychological health of people living with dementia during COVID-19: emerging evidence

International Long-term Care Policy Network

This report contains a short review of the emerging evidence on the impact of COVID-19 on the cognitive and psychological health of people living with dementia and the reported mitigating measures. Three papers describing the effects of lockdown on people with dementia living in the community show a worsening of functional independence and cognitive symptoms during the first month of lockdown (31% of people surveyed) and also exacerbated agitation, apathy and depression (54%), along with the deterioration of health status (40%) and increased used of antipsychotics or related drugs (7%). People with frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and their family caregivers seem to be particularly struggling to comply with protective measures. Only 2 case studies reporting strategies to support people with dementia in care homes have been produced so far. One describes a quarantine care plan for a person with FTD and the other, a mitigating strategy to ease the distress experienced by a man when his family stopped visiting during the pandemic. People living with dementia in care homes have experienced a particularly harsh version of lockdown – the ban on visits from spouses and partners in care is believed to be causing a significant deterioration in the health and wellbeing of residents with dementia. It is worth noting that a study involving 26 care homes proved that it is possible to implement successful infection control measures at the same time that visits are permitted. Learnings from this first COVID-19 wave can help the home care and day care sector prepare to minimise the disruption of their services in future waves so support can continue for people with dementia in the community. In care homes, evidence-based compassionate protocols should contribute to mitigating the detrimental effects of isolation and quarantine in residents with dementia (and their families).

Last updated on hub: 04 November 2020

Ethical care during COVID-19 for care home residents with dementia

Nursing Ethics

The COVID-19 pandemic has had a devastating impact on care homes in the United Kingdom, particularly for those residents living with dementia. The impetus for this article comes from a recent review conducted by the authors. That review, a qualitative media analysis of news and academic articles published during the first few months of the outbreak, identified ethical care as a key theme warranting further investigation within the context of the crisis. To explore ethical care further, a set of salient ethical values for delivering care to care home residents living with dementia during the pandemic was derived from a synthesis of relevant ethical standards, codes and philosophical approaches. The ethical values identified were caring, non-maleficence, beneficence, procedural justice, dignity in death and dying, well-being, safety, and personhood. Using these ethical values as a framework, alongside examples from contemporaneous media and academic sources, this article discusses the delivery of ethical care to care home residents with dementia within the context of COVID-19. The analysis identifies positive examples of ethical values displayed by care home staff, care sector organisations, healthcare professionals and third sector advocacy organisations. However, concerns relating to the death rates, dignity, safety, well-being and personhood – of residents and staff – are also evident. These shortcomings are attributable to negligent government strategy, which resulted in delayed guidance, lack of resources and Personal Protective Equipment, unclear data, and inconsistent testing. Consequently, this review demonstrates the ways in which care homes are underfunded, under resourced and undervalued.

Last updated on hub: 27 January 2021

Exploration of the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on people with dementia and carers from black and minority ethnic groups

BMJ Open

Introduction: Despite community efforts to support and enable older and vulnerable people during the COVID-19 pandemic, many people with dementia and their family carers are still finding it difficult to adjust their daily living in light of the disruption that the pandemic has caused. There may be needs specific to black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) populations in these circumstances that remain thus far unexplored. Objective: The aim of the study was to explore the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on people living with dementia and their family carers of BAME backgrounds, in relation to their experiences of community dementia care and the impact on their daily lives. Design: 15 participants (persons with dementia and carers) were recruited for semistructured qualitative interviews. Respondents were of South Asian and Afro-Caribbean backgrounds. This study used thematic analysis to analyse the data from a constructivist perspective, which emphasises the importance of multiple perspectives, contexts and values. Results: There were a number of ways that the COVID-19 pandemic has impacted BAME persons with dementia and carers with regard to their experiences of dementia community care and the impact on their everyday lives. This study identified eight key themes, with subthemes: fear and anxiety, food and eating (encompassing food shopping and eating patterns), isolation and identity, community and social relationships, adapting to COVID-19, social isolation and support structures, and medical interactions. Fear and anxiety formed an overarching theme that encompassed all others. Discussion: This paper covers unique and underexplored topics in a COVID-19-vulnerable group. There is limited work with these groups in the UK and this is especially true in COVID-19. The results showed that such impacts were far-reaching and affected not only day-to-day concerns, but also care decisions with long-ranging consequences, and existential interests around fear, faith, death and identity.

Last updated on hub: 30 June 2021

Exploring resilience and well-being of family caregivers of people with dementia exposed to mandatory social isolation by COVID-19

Dementia: the International Journal of Social Research and Practice

Background: The COVID-19 pandemic has raised questions about the resilience of health care systems worldwide. In this regard, one group of people whose physical and mental health has been affected has been family caregivers of people with dementia. Objective: This study aims to identify the variables that predict a high degree of well-being in family caregivers of people with dementia during this period of mandatory lockdown. Methods: A total of 310 respondents participated in an online survey (266 women and 44 men) from various regions in Spain, aged between 20 and 73 years old (M = 46.45; SD = 15.97), and all were family members. Results: The results showed that there were notable differences in all the protective variables, together with a significant strong positive relationship between well-being and resilience (r = 0.92; p < 0.01) and with coping strategies (r = 0.85; p < 0.01), and there were also some significant negative relationships between well-being and difficulties in emotional regulation (ρ = −.78; p < 0.01). The most predictive variables of a higher level of well-being included the type of dementia (β = 1.19; CI (95%) = 1.01-1.29; p< 0.01), living in a large house (β = 0.97; CI (95%) =. 23-0.98; p < 0.01), social support as a coping strategy (β = 1.27; CI (95%) = 1.21-1.29; p < 0.01) and mainly resilience (β = 1.34; CI (95%) = 1.30-1.37; p < 0.01). Discussion: this paper discusses the importance of promoting higher levels of resilience through the development of protective psychosocial variables in caregivers of people with dementia exposed to situations of mandatory social isolation as a modulator of the psychosocial well-being of these family caregivers.

Last updated on hub: 14 March 2022

Exploring the impact of Covid-19 on the care and quality of life of people with dementia and their carers: a scoping review

Dementia: the International Journal of Social Research and Practice

This article reports on findings of a scoping review aimed to map the published literature concerning the impact of Covid-19 on the care and quality of life of people living with dementia and their carers. Twenty-nine articles were included in the review. Three overarching themes were identified: (1) Impact on people with dementia – unmet and increased care needs; (2) Impact on carers – increased stress and burden and (3) Impact according to demographics. Overall, findings show that Covid-19 has led to a reduction in support from health and social services and to a move towards technology-based support. Furthermore, Covid-19 has had a negative impact on the care and quality of life of people living with dementia and their carers, and that this impact was influenced by the severity of dementia.

Last updated on hub: 14 March 2022

Order by    Date Title