COVID-19 resources on home care

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Dementia and COVID-19: social contact

Alzheimer's Society

This briefing sets out the evidence for action to support social contact for people living with dementia and what the Government need to do next. It covers: the impact of COVID-19 on people with dementia in the UK; the importance of social contact for people living with dementia; maintaining social contact in care homes; supporting the delivery of home care services. The briefing observes that as well as the severe impact of COVID-19 itself, restrictions under lockdown have imposed a lack of social contact and interaction which are known to be contributing factor in the decline of people with dementia. The paper calls on the Government to lead a task force with Local Authorities and expert groups to address how they will support people with dementia as the country emerges from the lockdown over the next 6-12 months, with social contact at the heart of the solution. Specific recommendations for both care homes and home care are included.

Last updated on hub: 10 August 2020

Adult social care and COVID-19: assessing the impact on social care users and staff in England so far

The Health Foundation

An overview of the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on social care in England, describing how the pandemic unfolded in the social care sector from March until June 2020, and examining the factors that contributed to the scale and severity of outbreaks in care homes. The briefing also attempts to quantify the disruption to health and social care access from February until the end of April 2020. The findings demonstrate that the pandemic has had a profound impact on people receiving and providing social care in England – since March, there have been more than 30,500 deaths among care home residents than it would be normally expected, and a further 4,500 excess deaths among people receiving care in their own homes (domiciliary care); and while deaths in care homes have now returned to average levels for this time of year, the latest data (up until 19 June) shows that there have continued to be excess deaths reported among domiciliary care users. Social care workers are among the occupational groups at highest risk of COVID-19 mortality, with care home workers and home carers accounting for the highest proportion (76%) of COVID-19 deaths within this group. The analysis also shows that there was a substantial reduction in hospital admissions among care home residents which may have helped reduce the risk of transmission but potentially increased unmet health needs. The briefing argues that long-standing structural issues have exacerbated the crisis in social care and hindered the response to the pandemic. It suggests that action is needed now to prevent further harm including by filling the gaps in data, particularly for those receiving domiciliary care, and by developing a new data strategy for social care.

Last updated on hub: 03 August 2020

Preventing and managing COVID-19 across long-term care services: policy brief

World Health Organization

This briefing provides policy objectives and key action points to prevent and manage COVID-19 across long-term care settings. The brief builds on currently available evidence on the measures taken to prevent, prepare for and respond to the pandemic across long-term care services including care providers. COVID-19 has affected older people disproportionately, especially those living in long-term care facilities. In many countries, evidence shows that more than 40% of COVID-19 related deaths have been linked to long-term care facilities, with figures being as high as 80% in some high-income countries. Concerted action is needed to mitigate the impact across all aspects of long-term care, including home- and community-based care, given that most users and providers of care are those who are vulnerable to severe COVID-19. Specifically, the paper argues that the following policy objectives should be pursued to mitigate the impact of COVID-19 across long-term care: include long-term care in all phases of the national response to the pandemic; mobilise adequate funding; ensure effective monitoring and evaluation of the impact of COVID-19 on long-term care; secure staff and resources, including adequate health workforce and health products; ensure the continuum and continuity of essential services for people receiving long-term care; ensure that infection prevention and control standards are implemented and adhered to in all long-term care settings; prioritise testing, contact tracing and monitoring of the spread of COVID-19 among people receiving and providing long-term care services; provide support for family and voluntary caregivers; prioritise the psychosocial well-being of people receiving and providing long-term care services; ensure a smooth transition to the recovery phase; and initiate steps for the transformation and integration of health and long-term care systems.

Last updated on hub: 27 July 2020

Homecare and supported living: a market where Coronavirus is accelerating existing trends

LaingBuisson

LaingBuisson in partnership with Addleshaw Goddard held a conversation about homecare and supported living during the COVID-19 pandemic. Homecare and supported living could be two of the “winners” from coronavirus. This webinar reviewed the new LaingBuisson market report, the market today and the outlook post coronavirus. You can download the slide deck that goes with the webinar here:https://www.laingbuissonevents.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/Webinar-Slides_Homecare-and-Supported-Living-070520.pdf [Webinar recorded 7 May 2020]

Last updated on hub: 22 July 2020

Infection prevention and control information

Harrogate and District NHS Foundation Trust

Produced by the team employed by Harrogate and District NHS Foundation Trust and commissioned to provide infection prevention and control (IPC)services in North Yorkshire covering Health and Social Care settings. Offers bespoke training and consultancy services, as well as an variety of downloadable resources for care homes and home care.

Last updated on hub: 22 July 2020

Pilot point prevalence survey of COVID-19 among domiciliary care staff in England

Public Health England

This pilot study provides the first estimate of the extent of COVID-19 infections among domiciliary care workers in England. A prospective descriptive survey of a sample of workers from domiciliary care providers was carried out in June 2020, using a sampling frame of all care providers in England registered with CQC. The findings provide evidence that the prevalence of COVID-19 among domiciliary care workers is in line with the general population as opposed to a higher prevalence as observed in studies of front-line healthcare workers and care home staff. It should be noted that this study took place post the peak of the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic and as a result its findings are not directly comparable to those emerging from care home and healthcare worker studies.

Last updated on hub: 16 July 2020

Mencap in Kirklees: provider responsiveness

Mencap in Kirklees

Practice example about how Mencap in Kirklees has responded during the COVID-19 pandemic to continue to provide day care services, domiciliary care and residential care for adults with learning disabilities. Also covers some of the challenges and learning points.

Last updated on hub: 16 July 2020

Princess Homecare: collaborative working and maintaining quality

Princess Homecare

Practice example about how Princess Homecare, a small domiciliary care agency in Wiltshire has coped during the COVID-19 pandemic. This includes the support provided by the Council and how they have kept a log of actions and activities taken due to COVID-19 Also covers some of the key challenges and learning points to date.

Last updated on hub: 16 July 2020

Risk factors for COVID-19 versus non-COVID-19 related in-hospital and community deaths by Local Authority District in Great Britain

medRxiv

This article is a preprint and has not been peer-reviewed. The lead researcher is Samuel Paul Leighton. Objectives: To undertake a preliminary hypothesis-generating analysis exploring putative risk factors for coronavirus diseae 2019 (COVID-19) population-adjusted deaths, compared with non-COVID-19 related deaths, at a local authority district (LAD) level in hospital, care homes and at home. Results: Significant risk factors for LAD COVID-19 death in comparison to non-COVID-19 related death were air pollution and proportion of the population who were female. Significant protective factors were higher air temperature and proportion of the population who were ex-smokers. Scottish local authorities and local authorities with a higher proportion of individuals of BAME origin are potential risk factors for COVID-19 related deaths in care homes and in hospitals, respectively.

Last updated on hub: 15 July 2020

Local government and Covid-19: social care, a neglected service

Local Government Information Unit

This briefing looks at the state of the social care sector pre-pandemic and the impact that the virus has had on care homes and domiciliary care. There were over 4,000 deaths involving COVID-19 in care homes England in the two weeks up to 28 April – over four times the number recorded in residential and nursing homes up to that point and it is not clear whether the virus has yet reached its peak in this sector. The social care sector has been underfunded and under-valued by successive governments and was in a parlous state before the pandemic took hold. The briefing discusses: rates of infections and deaths in social care settings; continuing concerns about lack of adequate PPE provision to both care homes and domiciliary care providers; lack of testing for both care workers and residents/clients and what this means for the safety of social care provision; the additional costs of COVID-19 on local authorities and care providers in an already underfunded and unstable sector; and the lessons that can be learnt.

Last updated on hub: 08 July 2020