COVID-19 resources on Home care

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Providing care and support at home to people who have had COVID-19

Social Care Institute for Excellence

Quick guide to help home care workers and personal assistants (PAs) to provide care and support to people who have left hospital after having COVID-19.

Last updated on hub: 03 November 2020

Rapid learning review of domiciliary care in Northern Ireland

Northern Ireland. Department of Health

This rapid learning review has collated and considered any learning about domiciliary care issues during the Covid-19 pandemic in Northern Ireland in order to inform current and future planning as the pandemic continues. The review focused on four themes: service user and carer experience; service provision; workforce experience; and infection prevention and control. Work stream leads were appointed for each theme and they undertook a wide engagement with a range of stakeholders and using a variety of methods for collecting data. In addition, a workforce and management survey was carried out to seek feedback on three of the four themes. These were workforce, service provision/business continuity and infection prevention and control. A rapid literature review was also commissioned to add to the evidence from stakeholders. The evidence from the literature review was broadly consistent with the messages from the stakeholder engagement with common themes and lessons learned identified. The review highlighted some of the challenges domiciliary care staff faced such as PPE, training, testing and lack of adequate support. Staff felt overlooked and that domiciliary care did not get the recognition it deserved. The review has also highlighted the wider systemic issues that affect domiciliary care, including pay, terms and conditions of the workforce. Domiciliary care service users and their family carers reported feeling forgotten about and afraid to use domiciliary care because of fear of infection during the earlier stages of the pandemic. For many others, however, domiciliary care was the only service that continued for them. Both situations placed service users and carers under very significant pressure.

Last updated on hub: 26 November 2020

Readying the NHS and adult social care in England for COVID-19

National Audit Office

This report sets out the evidence around government’s progress in preparing the NHS and social care for the COVID-19 outbreak. The report examines the facts relating to the coordination of the NHS and social care response; the change in demand for hospital care and the impact of increased bed and respiratory support capacity; the provision of adult social care and shielding for the most vulnerable; and expanding, equipping and supporting the health and adult social care workforces. Key findings include: there is concerns in parts of the social care sector that local authorities have not increased fee rates paid to care providers; while reported outbreaks of COVID-19 in care homes peaked at the start of April, it is not known how many residents have had COVID-19 or how many of those discharged from hospitals into care homes had COVID-19 at the time of discharge; about half of the 2.2 million people classed as clinically extremely vulnerable to COVID-19 have registered for support; on average, reported staff absence rates in care homes were around 10 per cent between mid-April and mid-May; from 28 April, all social care workers were eligible for tests, but the Department capped the daily amount of care home tests at 30,000; the central stockpile of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) was designed for a flu pandemic and a range of bodies across health and social care have expressed concern about PPE supply; the supply of PPE from central sources up to mid-May only met some of the modelled requirement from health and social care providers.

Last updated on hub: 15 June 2020

Recommendations in covid-19 times: a view for home care

Brazilian Journal of Nursing (Revista Brasileira de Enfermagem)

Objective: To suggest recommendations for the practice of Home Nursing in the context of COVID-19. Method: Reflective study, originated from readings associated with the theme, available in current guidelines from the Pan American Health Organization, World Health Organization and the Ministry of Health. Results: Recommendations were developed from current scientific evidence for prevention of infections, control of epidemics and pandemics in the Brazilian home scenario. Final considerations: the reflections achieved contribute to guiding actions for better assistance to the patient, family caregivers and the community in the perspective of safe home care with COVID-19, and it is characterized as an introductory discussion on the theme, encouraging new studies to be carried out from the unfolding of the current scenario.

Last updated on hub: 19 October 2020

Report of the Social Care Taskforce's Older People and People Affected by Dementia Advisory Group

Department of Health and Social Care

This is the report of the Older People and People Affected by Dementia Advisory Group, established to make recommendations to feed into the work of the Social Care Sector COVID -19 Support Taskforce. The recommendations cover the following areas: restoring and sustaining contact with visitors in care homes; restoring care services and assessments; reinstating and sustaining community-based services and support; restoring and sustaining access to health care; ensuring effective safeguarding; and planning for and managing outbreaks. The report calls for all care settings and providers to have sufficient PPE; regular and ongoing testing of care staff and care recipients; the testing regime to be reliable and timely in its operation and resultant data to be shared with relevant NHS bodies and professionals, as well as providers; the flu vaccination programme to be unparalleled in its scope and ambition, and reach out to all social care staff and recipients in all settings, and informal carers too, supported by mass marketing; the financial resilience of care providers to be kept under constant review, with plans in place and regularly updated by CQC, central and local Government, to mitigate any significant market failure; total and available care capacity should be published weekly; and the ongoing challenges in data sharing and data governance between health and social care settings must be resolved by September 2020.

Last updated on hub: 21 September 2020

Risk factors for COVID-19 versus non-COVID-19 related in-hospital and community deaths by Local Authority District in Great Britain

medRxiv

This article is a preprint and has not been peer-reviewed. The lead researcher is Samuel Paul Leighton. Objectives: To undertake a preliminary hypothesis-generating analysis exploring putative risk factors for coronavirus diseae 2019 (COVID-19) population-adjusted deaths, compared with non-COVID-19 related deaths, at a local authority district (LAD) level in hospital, care homes and at home. Results: Significant risk factors for LAD COVID-19 death in comparison to non-COVID-19 related death were air pollution and proportion of the population who were female. Significant protective factors were higher air temperature and proportion of the population who were ex-smokers. Scottish local authorities and local authorities with a higher proportion of individuals of BAME origin are potential risk factors for COVID-19 related deaths in care homes and in hospitals, respectively.

Last updated on hub: 15 July 2020

Self-direction of home and community-based services in the time of COVID-19

Journal of Gerontological Social Work

During the COVID-19 pandemic, nursing homes and assisted living facilities have accounted for over 20% of all infections, adult day care and other congregate sites have closed, and traditional home care agencies are facing staff shortages. In this environment, self-direction of home and community-based services, where the participant can hire their own staff and manage a budget that can be used for a broad range of goods and services including home modifications and assistive devices, is seen as a promising intervention. Using self-direction participants can minimize the number of people who enter their homes and pay close family and friends who were already providing many hours of informal care, and now may be unemployed. The Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services is encouraging this approach. This commentary presents information on how states have responded using the new CMS Toolkit by expanding who can be a paid caregiver, increasing budgets and broadening the kinds of items that can be purchased with budgets to include items like personal protective equipment and supports for telehealth. This Commentary concludes with policy and research questions regarding how the delivery of long-term services and supports (LTSS) may change as the world returns to“normal”.

Last updated on hub: 28 January 2021

Self-direction of home and community-based services in the time of COVID-19

Journal of Gerontological Social Work

During the COVID-19 pandemic, nursing homes and assisted living facilities have accounted for over 20% of all infections, adult day care and other congregate sites have closed, and traditional home care agencies are facing staff shortages. In this environment, self-direction of home and community-based services, where the participant can hire their own staff and manage a budget that can be used for a broad range of goods and services including home modifications and assistive devices, is seen as a promising intervention. Using self-direction participants can minimize the number of people who enter their homes and pay close family and friends who were already providing many hours of informal care, and now may be unemployed. The Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services is encouraging this approach. This commentary presents information on how states have responded using the new CMS Toolkit by expanding who can be a paid caregiver, increasing budgets and broadening the kinds of items that can be purchased with budgets to include items like personal protective equipment and supports for telehealth. This Commentary concludes with policy and research questions regarding how the delivery of long-term services and supports (LTSS) may change as the world returns to“normal”.

Last updated on hub: 20 June 2020

Strengthening the health system response to COVID-19: preventing and managing the COVID-19 pandemic across long-term care services in the WHO European Region (May 29, 2020)

World Health Organization Regional Office for Europe

This technical guidance identifies ten policy objectives to prevent and manage COVID-19 infections in long-term care services. It includes proposed actions and examples from across Europe and aims to help decision-makers, policy-makers and national or regional health authorities as they seek ways to prevent and manage the COVID-19 pandemic in long-term care services. The focus is on older people above the age of 65 years who use long-term care services in their homes, day centres or residential homes and nursing homes. The 10 policy objectives cover: Prioritizing the maintenance of LTC services; Mobilizing additional funds; Implementing prevention and control standards; Implementing safety measures that recognise the mutual benefits of the safety of people receiving and providing LTC services; Prioritizing testing, tracing and monitoring the spread of COVID-19; Securing staff and resources; Scaling up support for family caregivers; Coordinate between services; Secure access to dignified palliative care services; and Prioritize the well-being of people receiving and providing LTC services.

Last updated on hub: 28 May 2020

Supporting children with disabilities at home during COVID-19: a resource pack for parents and caregivers

Leonard Cheshire Disability

The COVID-19 outbreak has had an impact on how people live their lives in every country around the world. In this context it is very important that the specific needs of children with disabilities are taken into account. This resource pack provides advice and guidance for parents and caregivers on how best to protect and support their children with disabilities during the COVID-19 outbreak. Topics covered include: general guidance for parents and caregivers of children with disabilities; supporting children with disabilities to learn at home during the COVID-19 outbreak; safeguarding during COVID-19; communication and access to information for persons with disabilities during COVID-19.

Last updated on hub: 17 February 2021

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