COVID-19 resources on Home care

Results 31 - 40 of 84

Order by    Date Title

Mitigating the impact of the COVID-19 outbreak: a review of international measures to support community-based care

International Long-term Care Policy Network

This report provides a brief overview of the policy responses and practice measures used internationally to respond to the impact of COVID-19 on the provision of community-based care. The data provided is largely collected from the country reports on the COVID-19 long-term care situation, including Australia, Austria, Brazil, China, England, Germany, Hong Kong, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Netherlands, Slovenia, South Korea, and the United States. Key findings include: community-based care faces unique challenges during the COVID-19 pandemic compared to other parts of the long-term care continuum; several countries have taken steps to prevent the spread of COVID-19 infections in community-based care including the closure of adult day centres and other service providers; continuity of care is of upmost importance – a disruption of care and support could have serious negative impacts on individual health and well-being due to increased risk of loneliness and social isolation; the dispersed nature of community based care suggests that direct governmental action and oversight may be more difficult to provide than for residential care settings such as care homes or nursing facilities; efforts to maintain continuity of care in community-based care include government financial support to home care workers; recruitment of volunteers and family members to act as paid carers; and the provision of remote psychological supports to home care workers; some countries have taken steps to move patients and home care workers to residential care settings; few countries are specifically reporting data on infections and deaths among users of home care – an exception to this is Australia; overall evidence of national measures to support community-based care is still lacking for most countries.

Last updated on hub: 04 November 2020

Providing care and support at home to people who have had COVID-19

Social Care Institute for Excellence

Quick guide to help home care workers and personal assistants (PAs) to provide care and support to people who have left hospital after having COVID-19.

Last updated on hub: 03 November 2020

Exploring the challenges faced by frontline workers in health and social care amid the COVID-19 pandemic: experiences of frontline workers in the English Midlands region, UK

Journal of Interprofessional Care

The first cases of Coronavirus (COVID-19) were reported in Wuhan, China in December 2019. Globally millions of people have been diagnosed with the virus whilst thousands have died. As the virus kept spreading health and social care frontline workers (HSCFW) were faced with difficulties when discharging their duties. This paper was set out to explore the challenges faced by different frontline workers in health and social care during the COVID-19 pandemic. The research utilized an explorative qualitative approach. A total of forty (N = 40) in-depth one-to-one semi-structured interviews were undertaken with HSCFW who included support workers (n = 15), nurses (n = 15), and managers (N = 10). Health and social care workers were drawn from domiciliary care and care homes (with and without nursing services). All the interviews were done online. The data were thematically analyzed, and the emergent themes were supported by quotes from the interviews held with participants. Following data analysis the research study found that lack of pandemic preparedness, shortage of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE), anxiety and fear amongst professionals, challenges in enforcing social distancing, challenges in fulfilling social shielding responsibility, anxiety and fear amongst residents and service users, delay in testing, evolving PPE guidance and shortage of staff were challenges faced by frontline health and social care workers during COVID-19 pandemic. The results of the current study point to a need for adequate pandemic preparedness within the health and social care sector to protect both frontline workers and the individuals they look after.

Last updated on hub: 01 November 2020

Recommendations in covid-19 times: a view for home care

Brazilian Journal of Nursing (Revista Brasileira de Enfermagem)

Objective: To suggest recommendations for the practice of Home Nursing in the context of COVID-19. Method: Reflective study, originated from readings associated with the theme, available in current guidelines from the Pan American Health Organization, World Health Organization and the Ministry of Health. Results: Recommendations were developed from current scientific evidence for prevention of infections, control of epidemics and pandemics in the Brazilian home scenario. Final considerations: the reflections achieved contribute to guiding actions for better assistance to the patient, family caregivers and the community in the perspective of safe home care with COVID-19, and it is characterized as an introductory discussion on the theme, encouraging new studies to be carried out from the unfolding of the current scenario.

Last updated on hub: 19 October 2020

Impact of COVID-19 policy responses on live-in care workers in Austria, Germany, and Switzerland

Journal of Long-Term Care

Context: The measures taken to counter the COVID-19 pandemic restricted the circular migration of live-in care workers between their countries of origin and the elderly persons’ households. Objective: In this comparative policy analysis, the impact of COVID-19 related policy measures for transnationally organised live-in care in Austria, Germany, and Switzerland is investigated. Method: Policy measures and media debates were analysed and inquiries with care workers, representatives of care agencies, unions, and activist groups were carried out between March and June 2020. Findings: In accordance with their institutionalisation of live-in care, Austria, Germany, and Switzerland responded differently to the challenges the pandemic posed to live-in care arrangements. However, all three countries focused on extending care workers’ rotas and re-establishing transnational mobility. These priorities subordinated the interests of care workers to those of care recipients. Furthermore, the measures remained short-term solutions that failed to acknowledge the fundamental flaws and inequalities of a care model that relies primarily on female migrant workers and wage differentials within Europe. Limitations: This policy comparison is based on an in-depth analysis of COVID-19 related policies, supplemented by inquiries among stakeholders with whom research had been done prior to the pandemic. More in-depth interviews are required to further substantiate the findings concerning their perspectives and gain insight into the longer-term effects of the pandemic. Implications: The pandemic has brought the flaws of the live-in care model to the fore. Countries need to rethink their fragile care policies, which build on social inequality and uninhibited transnational mobility.

Last updated on hub: 15 October 2020

What is the risk of transmission of COVID-19 when delivering domiciliary care, and how effective are interventions that aim to minimise that risk?: a rapid review

Public Health England

A review of the evidence related to the transmission of COVID-19 in domiciliary care. No studies were found describing the risk of transmission when delivering domiciliary care (either from the care worker to care receiver or vice versa). Furthermore, no studies were found describing the effectiveness of interventions that aim to reduce the spread of COVID-19 when delivering domiciliary care. Professional opinions on how to safely deliver domiciliary care were identified in the literature; these support the application of general infection prevention and control practices, the use of risk assessments, ensuring staff are appropriately trained and employing an ‘only when necessary’ approach to face-to-face contact.

Last updated on hub: 12 October 2020

Delivering care at home and housing support services during the COVID-19 pandemic: Care Inspectorate inquiry into decision making and partnership working

Care Inspectorate Scotland

This report draws together the views of health and social care partnerships and service providers in Scotland about their experience of care at home and housing support services during the first phase of this pandemic. It sets out the findings of a Care Inspectorate’s inquiry which investigated how these services were prioritised to help ensure service delivery continuity; what were the known impacts on people who experience care; how the risks to service delivery were mitigated; how effective were the partnership working arrangements; and what were the recovery plans for services. The inquiry found that the most robust responses to the challenges and uncertainties of the pandemic involved an integrated approach and included: targeting resources to meet gaps and pressures as they occurred and reviewing and refining approaches as new information came to light; maintaining a focus on how staff remained confident, safe and secure by addressing the challenges of PPE, guidance and testing; responding quickly with additional financial support and guarantees to ensure services remained viable and that the commitment was not undermined by unpredictable reductions in income and additional costs; investing in staff terms and conditions to reduce disincentives to testing and self-isolating when required; and working together across health and social care, service providers and the community.

Last updated on hub: 30 September 2020

Webinar recording: Social care personal assistants (PAs) – the forgotten home care service during COVID-19

Social Care Institute for Excellence

This webinar focuses on those who employ or work as PAs, their experiences, concerns and key lessons for the future.

Last updated on hub: 21 September 2020

Adult social care: our COVID-19 winter plan 2020 to 2021

Department of Health and Social Care

This policy paper sets out the key elements of national support available for the social care sector for winter 2020 to 2021, as well as the main actions to take for local authorities, NHS organisations, and social care providers, including in the voluntary and community sector. It covers four themes: preventing and controlling the spread of infection in care settings; collaboration across health and care services; supporting people who receive social care, the workforce, and carers; and supporting the system. Each section sets out the Department of Health and Social Care’s offer of national support and the department’s expectations for adult social care providers alongside published guidance. The plan applies to all settings and contexts in which people receive adult social care. This includes people’s own homes, residential care homes and nursing homes, and other community settings.[Published 18 September 2020. Last updated 20 November 2020]

Last updated on hub: 21 September 2020

Report of the Social Care Taskforce's Older People and People Affected by Dementia Advisory Group

Department of Health and Social Care

This is the report of the Older People and People Affected by Dementia Advisory Group, established to make recommendations to feed into the work of the Social Care Sector COVID -19 Support Taskforce. The recommendations cover the following areas: restoring and sustaining contact with visitors in care homes; restoring care services and assessments; reinstating and sustaining community-based services and support; restoring and sustaining access to health care; ensuring effective safeguarding; and planning for and managing outbreaks. The report calls for all care settings and providers to have sufficient PPE; regular and ongoing testing of care staff and care recipients; the testing regime to be reliable and timely in its operation and resultant data to be shared with relevant NHS bodies and professionals, as well as providers; the flu vaccination programme to be unparalleled in its scope and ambition, and reach out to all social care staff and recipients in all settings, and informal carers too, supported by mass marketing; the financial resilience of care providers to be kept under constant review, with plans in place and regularly updated by CQC, central and local Government, to mitigate any significant market failure; total and available care capacity should be published weekly; and the ongoing challenges in data sharing and data governance between health and social care settings must be resolved by September 2020.

Last updated on hub: 21 September 2020

Order by    Date Title