COVID-19 resources on home care

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Readying the NHS and adult social care in England for COVID-19

National Audit Office

This report sets out the evidence around government’s progress in preparing the NHS and social care for the COVID-19 outbreak. The report examines the facts relating to the coordination of the NHS and social care response; the change in demand for hospital care and the impact of increased bed and respiratory support capacity; the provision of adult social care and shielding for the most vulnerable; and expanding, equipping and supporting the health and adult social care workforces. Key findings include: there is concerns in parts of the social care sector that local authorities have not increased fee rates paid to care providers; while reported outbreaks of COVID-19 in care homes peaked at the start of April, it is not known how many residents have had COVID-19 or how many of those discharged from hospitals into care homes had COVID-19 at the time of discharge; about half of the 2.2 million people classed as clinically extremely vulnerable to COVID-19 have registered for support; on average, reported staff absence rates in care homes were around 10 per cent between mid-April and mid-May; from 28 April, all social care workers were eligible for tests, but the Department capped the daily amount of care home tests at 30,000; the central stockpile of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) was designed for a flu pandemic and a range of bodies across health and social care have expressed concern about PPE supply; the supply of PPE from central sources up to mid-May only met some of the modelled requirement from health and social care providers.

Last updated on hub: 15 June 2020

Report of the Social Care Taskforce’s Older People and People Affected by Dementia Advisory Group

Department of Health and Social Care

This is the report of the Older People and People Affected by Dementia Advisory Group, established to make recommendations to feed into the work of the Social Care Sector COVID -19 Support Taskforce. The recommendations cover the following areas: restoring and sustaining contact with visitors in care homes; restoring care services and assessments; reinstating and sustaining community-based services and support; restoring and sustaining access to health care; ensuring effective safeguarding; and planning for and managing outbreaks. The report calls for all care settings and providers to have sufficient PPE; regular and ongoing testing of care staff and care recipients; the testing regime to be reliable and timely in its operation and resultant data to be shared with relevant NHS bodies and professionals, as well as providers; the flu vaccination programme to be unparalleled in its scope and ambition, and reach out to all social care staff and recipients in all settings, and informal carers too, supported by mass marketing; the financial resilience of care providers to be kept under constant review, with plans in place and regularly updated by CQC, central and local Government, to mitigate any significant market failure; total and available care capacity should be published weekly; and the ongoing challenges in data sharing and data governance between health and social care settings must be resolved by September 2020.

Last updated on hub: 21 September 2020

Risk factors for COVID-19 versus non-COVID-19 related in-hospital and community deaths by Local Authority District in Great Britain

medRxiv

This article is a preprint and has not been peer-reviewed. The lead researcher is Samuel Paul Leighton. Objectives: To undertake a preliminary hypothesis-generating analysis exploring putative risk factors for coronavirus diseae 2019 (COVID-19) population-adjusted deaths, compared with non-COVID-19 related deaths, at a local authority district (LAD) level in hospital, care homes and at home. Results: Significant risk factors for LAD COVID-19 death in comparison to non-COVID-19 related death were air pollution and proportion of the population who were female. Significant protective factors were higher air temperature and proportion of the population who were ex-smokers. Scottish local authorities and local authorities with a higher proportion of individuals of BAME origin are potential risk factors for COVID-19 related deaths in care homes and in hospitals, respectively.

Last updated on hub: 15 July 2020

Social care personal assistants (PAs) – the forgotten home care service during COVID-19

This webinar will focus on those who employ or work as PAs, their experiences, concerns and key lessons for the future.

Last updated on hub: 21 September 2020

Strengthening the health system response to COVID-19: preventing and managing the COVID-19 pandemic across long-term care services in the WHO European Region (May 29, 2020)

World Health Organization Regional Office for Europe

This technical guidance identifies ten policy objectives to prevent and manage COVID-19 infections in long-term care services. It includes proposed actions and examples from across Europe and aims to help decision-makers, policy-makers and national or regional health authorities as they seek ways to prevent and manage the COVID-19 pandemic in long-term care services. The focus is on older people above the age of 65 years who use long-term care services in their homes, day centres or residential homes and nursing homes. The 10 policy objectives cover: Prioritizing the maintenance of LTC services; Mobilizing additional funds; Implementing prevention and control standards; Implementing safety measures that recognise the mutual benefits of the safety of people receiving and providing LTC services; Prioritizing testing, tracing and monitoring the spread of COVID-19; Securing staff and resources; Scaling up support for family caregivers; Coordinate between services; Secure access to dignified palliative care services; and Prioritize the well-being of people receiving and providing LTC services.

Last updated on hub: 28 May 2020

Surviving the pandemic: new challenges for adult social care and the social care market. Discussion paper

Institute of Public Care

This discussion paper looks at how councils have avoided the predicted collapse over the period of austerity and highlights new problems that have emerged during the coronavirus (Covid -19) pandemic. Drawing on the authors previous papers, it explores these new problems facing providers of care homes and home care, and asks how the care provider sector can survive after the pandemic. It identifies the risk to the care provider market and the need for councils to find ways of managing increased demand.

Last updated on hub: 06 May 2020

Temporary funding for adult social care providers during the Covid-19 Crisis

Local Government Association

This joint statement from the Local Government Association and the Association of Directors of Adult Social Services focuses on stabilising the adult social care market during the coronavirus (Covid-19) pandemic. It provides a framework for the consideration of the locally determined temporary funding of social care providers during the Covid-19 crisis and provides information to help councils who have not yet been able to agree what level of temporary additional support providers in their local area will need.

Last updated on hub: 14 April 2020

The practical steps local authorities are taking to support local social care providers

Association of Directors of Adult Social Services

This summary sets out some of the measures that local authorities have put in place to support care home and home care providers, ensure their stability and safeguard care and support during the COVID-19 pandemic. It focuses on the financial support and practical support being offered to social care providers.

Last updated on hub: 29 May 2020

The safe use of medication during the COVID-19 pandemic

Scottish Social Services Council

A guide for social care workers supporting people at home or in a care home. It offers support, information and resources for social care workers who have the responsibility to carry out one or more of the following types of support: prompt – remind someone to take their medication using their preferred communication method; assist – help someone who manages their own medication with physical tasks like opening bottles, at their request; administer medication – prepare the right medication, at the right time and support a person to take it in the right way in line with their care or support plan and advice from the prescriber or pharmacist.

Last updated on hub: 18 September 2020

Verification of Expected Death (VOED) with clinical remote support: guidance for adult social care workers: consultation version

Skills for Care

This guidance is primarily for adult social care providers in residential and community settings, outlining the process and procedures for verifying an expected death with remote clinical support. It is designed to support decision making within local systems and explains how to prepare to verify an expected death with remote support. The Coronavirus Act 2020 and recent government guidance makes special arrangements for verifying an expected death with clinical remote support in a community setting, such as care homes, supported living accommodation or when a person receives care in their own home. The guide covers: what providers and managers need to think about beforehand to inform decision making about verifying expected death with clinical remote support and who to involve; information to support decision making of whether care staff will verify a person’s death with remote support; the process of verifying an expected death with remote support; what to consider after the process, care of the deceased and the family and the importance of employee wellbeing and support for those involved, including sources of support.

Last updated on hub: 06 July 2020