COVID-19 resources on Infection control

Results 1 - 10 of 662

Order by    Date Title

Infection prevention and control in social care (Social care transition plan)

Welsh Government

Guidance on infection prevention and control measures for social care in Wales. This document is intended to provide the social care sector with an outline summary of changes to the Test, Trace, Protect (TTP) arrangements and infection prevention control (IPC) guidance as the Covid-19 alert level is eased. It incorporates advice on care homes, visiting care homes, care home residents, declaring and outbreak and outbreak management in care homes. This document signposts to more detailed Welsh Government and Public Health Wales guidance. A quick reference guide to the key messages can be found at Annex 1.

Last updated on hub: 13 April 2022

COVID-19 supplement to the infection prevention and control resource for adult social care

Department of Health and Social Care

This supplement provides additional information regarding safe working when caring for people with COVID-19 in the provision of adult social care services. This guidance sets out how to reduce the spread of COVID-19 in adult social care settings in England. It includes guidance under the following headings: staff IPC considerations - vaccination, personal protective equipment (PPE), staff movement, testing; IPC considerations for people receiving care: vaccination, testing, environmental considerations, ventilation and waste management; considerations specific to care homes - admissions, testing, visiting and outbreak management. The guidance is for people responsible for setting and maintaining standards of IPC within adult social care in England, such as care managers. It should be read with the infection prevention and control (IPC) resource for adult social care, which should be used as a basis for any IPC response. This supplement should also be read with the adult social care testing guidance, which details the testing regimes for all staff, as well as any resident and outbreak testing where applicable. This guidance applies from 4 April 2022. [First published 31 March 2022. Last updated 3 May 2022]

Last updated on hub: 06 April 2022

Infection prevention and control: quick guide for care workers

Department of Health and Social Care

This quick guide aimed at care workers working in adult social care, sets out general infection prevention and control guidance in relation to hand hygiene; respiratory hygiene; personal protective equipment; cleaning; laundry and waste disposal. It is published alongside guidance for managers setting out l infection prevention and control principles to be used in combination with guidance on managing specific infections. The guidance applies from 4 April 2022. [First published 31 March 2022]

Last updated on hub: 06 April 2022

Infection prevention and control: resource for adult social care

Department of Health and Social Care

This document sets out general infection prevention and control principles to be used in combination with guidance on managing specific infections. It is for people responsible for setting and maintaining standards of infection prevention and control within adult social care in England, such as care managers. The guidance covers: preventing infection; information about vaccination, antimicrobial resistance, invasive devices and wounds, moving between settings; information about managing infection and leadership and governance. Appendix 1 includes links to further information; (below) for further information; Appendix 2: roles and responsibilities; Appendix 3: common types of body fluid; and Appendix 4: glossary of terms. A Covid-19 supplement has been published alongside this guidance. The guidance applies from 4 April 2022. [First published 31 March 2022]

Last updated on hub: 06 April 2022

Cognition, care homes and COVID-19: sacrificing minds to keep bodies alive

International Journal of Care and Caring

The COVID-19 restrictions are described from my standpoint with my mother living in residential care. I argue that restrictions have saved my mother’s body, through destroying her mental capacity. The unstated assumption ‐ live bodies justify sacrificed minds ‐ are voiced. Her quality of life remains at an all-time low, with her body preserved only through the sapping of life’s relevance through a drastic reduction in meaningful contact with her family and loved ones. I believe that my mother never would have wished to be kept alive at this cost, but, unfortunately, she no longer has capacity to discuss such issues.

Last updated on hub: 31 March 2022

Informal care in Australia during the COVID-19 pandemic

International Journal of Care and Caring

Australia has been less impacted by COVID-19 than most other countries, partly due to strong preventive responses by government. While these measures have resulted in lower rates of infection, family and friend carers have been disproportionately affected by public health orders. The heightened risk of transmission to vulnerable populations, combined with the impact of economic uncertainty, unclear government communication, significant restrictions on movement and personal contact, and the reduction in formal support services, have highlighted pre-existing, systemic shortcomings in support for carers. The COVID-19 pandemic left many carers more stressed, isolated and worse off financially.

Last updated on hub: 31 March 2022

Under reconstruction: the impact of COVID-19 policies on the lives and support networks of older people living alone

International Journal of Care and Caring

In the spring of 2020, the Austrian government introduced COVID-19 containment policies that had various impacts on older people living alone and their care arrangements. Seven qualitative telephone interviews with older people living alone were conducted to explore how they were affected by these policies. The findings show that the management of everyday life and support was challenging for older people living alone, even though they did not perceive the pandemic as a threat. To better address the needs of older people living alone, it would be important to actively negotiate single measures in the area of conflict between protection, safety and assurance of autonomy.

Last updated on hub: 31 March 2022

The impact of physical distancing on socially vulnerable people needing care during the COVID-19 pandemic in the Netherlands

International Journal of Care and Caring

What was the impact of physical distancing on socially vulnerable groups needing care during the first COVID-19 pandemic lockdown in the Netherlands? The researchers conducted repeated qualitative interviews with 141 people in care relationships and 106 professionals, and two repeated surveys among older populations outside (n = 1697) and inside long-term care facilities (n = 2619). Findings show a diversity of experiences, ranging from relative calmness and feeling socially normal, to loneliness and loss of perspective. Care must be seen as essential social traffic needed to guarantee basic quality of life for these groups during disease outbreaks. Findings emphasise an empirical ethics approach to policy interventions.

Last updated on hub: 31 March 2022

Long-term care facilities (LTCFs) during the COVID-19 pandemic - lessons from the Asian approach: a narrative review

Journal of the American Medical Directors Association

Objectives: The COVID-19 pandemic put into question the organizational skills of LTCF. The containment measures implemented in several Asian countries avoided heavy death tolls in LTCF in contrast to other countries across the globe. The aim of this review is therefore to investigate and illustrate the measures that were undertaken in Asia to contain and prevent the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic in LTCF. Design: Narrative review. Setting and Participants: Asian older subjects institutionalized in LTCF. Methods: Broad literature research from July 2020–April 2021. The following search terms were used: “COVID-19 Nursing homes” AND the country of interest or “contact tracing.” Eligible categories for inclusion comprise editorials, reviews, government guidelines, letters to the editor, and perspectives. The COVID-19 measures were then subdivided into different sections and compiled into an evidence table. Results: Prompt measures were put into action since the beginning of the pandemic that avoided the spread of COVID-19 in LTCF. Examples range from simple acts of proper hand hygiene and environmental disinfection, swab testing, social distancing, preventive measures on health care workers, organizational measures such as quarantine, outbreak control, visitor restrictions, relationship with acute hospitals, and admission policy. Technology also played a fundamental role in promoting social distancing by using specific robots and in managing contact tracing. Conclusions and Implications: The Asian preventive control guidelines are similar to those recommended elsewhere. Difference in timing and past experience with prior outbreaks such as SARS and MERS might have favoured the Asian response. Furthermore, sociocultural values toward older persons by protecting and making sure that LTCF are part of the health care system could have also played a role.

Last updated on hub: 30 March 2022

Two years of life under lockdown

King's College London

This report presents the findings from a survey of 1,229 adults aged 16+ in the United Kingdom to understand how people’s lifestyles and behaviours changed since the pandemic started; the state of the pandemic; opinions on the Government’s response to the pandemic, and the role of scientists and experts; and perceptions of NHS services. 3 in 10 UK adults (31%) say they are feeling lonelier now than before the pandemic (58% report no change). Alongside this, nearly half think they see friends and family less (46%) and leave the house less (45%) than before the pandemic began. Four in ten 16-34 year olds (39%) say they feel more lonely than before the pandemic started about two years ago. A third of people believe that their physical (32%) and mental (33%) health has got worse (half in each case say it is about the same). The youngest (16-34) are most likely to feel that their mental health has deteriorated during the pandemic, with 42% saying it had, though one in four (23%) said that it had improved. Women are also more likely than men to feel their mental health is now worse (by 38% to 28%). 58% believe the pandemic isn’t completely over. That rises to 78% of those aged over 55, but those aged 16-34 are more divided (39% believe it isn’t over, compared to 35% who believe it is). The public are more positive about the UK government’s handling of the pandemic now than at earlier points in the pandemic. 54% of those aged 16-75 believe that the UK government’s response to the pandemic has been confused and inconsistent, but that has declined since 2020 and particularly fallen since the second lockdown in November 2020 when two-thirds (68%) said that was the case.

Last updated on hub: 29 March 2022

Order by    Date Title