COVID-19 resources on infection control

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4 reasons housing providers must revise their telecare needs post COVID-19

Appello

This guide highlights the changing landscape for the delivery of technology enabled care services (TECS). It draws on findings from interviews and independent research undertaken with the Housing Learning and Improvement Network (LIN) of 120 senior executives from providers of supported, sheltered and retirement housing. The analysis indicates that 85% housing providers report their perceptions on the use of technology have changed as a result of COVID-19 while 74% feel that their requirements for telecare and wellbeing technologies have changed as a result of the pandemic. The document sets out four key reasons that support the strengthening and consolidation of the telecare offer within housing settings and makes recommendations on how to achieve this. The four reasons are: vulnerable communities need support to maintain their social connections – there is huge potential for housing providers to harness communication technologies to help connect older people and promote digital inclusion; remote working will be here to stay – 80% of housing providers believe video communication between residents and staff is becoming more important to their organisation because of COVID-19; how we access healthcare services will change – for instance, it is likely that the pandemic will be the catalyst for greater use of video appointments within the health sector; more services are being accessed online – in an uncertain world, with shielding and social distancing it is becoming even more vital to help older and vulnerable people to access support, and services from paying bills online to accessing pensions and shopping from home while keeping safe.

Last updated on hub: 04 August 2020

A COVID-19 guide for care staff supporting an adult with learning disabilities/autism

Social Care Institute for Excellence

A guide to help care staff and personal assistants supporting adults with learning disabilities and autistic adults through the COVID-19 crisis.

Last updated on hub: 17 April 2020

A COVID-19 guide for carers and family supporting an adult with learning disabilities/autism

Social Care Institute for Excellence

A guide to help family members and carers supporting adults and children with learning disabilities and autistic adults through the COVID-19 crisis.

Last updated on hub: 17 April 2020

A COVID-19 guide for social workers supporting an adult with learning disabilities/autism

Social Care Institute for Excellence

A guide to help social workers and occupational therapists supporting autistic adults and adults with learning disabilities through the COVID-19 crisis.

Last updated on hub: 17 April 2020

Accommodation for perpetrators of domestic abuse: emerging issues and responses due to COVID-19

Drive Project

Isolation and social distancing during the COVID-19 lockdown have led and are likely to continue to lead to an increase in domestic abuse, violence and coercive control at all levels of risk. This paper argues that, where it would be in the best interests of the victim and better ensure their safety and wellbeing, adequate housing provision is urgently needed for perpetrators of domestic violence. The lack of availability of such accommodation is limiting options available to victims and police in their endeavour to keep victims safe.

Last updated on hub: 30 June 2020

Achieving residential care business success: moving beyond COVID-19

CoolCare

Coming from a range of backgrounds of working and investing in residential care provision, the panellists in this webinar offer practical ideas on how residential care businesses can move through the coronavirus crisis as well sharing their views on the future of the market. The webinar provides advice and guidance on a multitude of topics, including: new care home design and layout trends to boost enquiry conversions and infection control; the power technology is having on restoring consumer confidence when placing a loved one; and new staffing processes that are been implemented to boost compliance and minimise risk.

Last updated on hub: 13 July 2020

Admission and care of residents in a care home during COVID-19

Department of Health and Social Care

Government guidance setting out how to admit and care for residents of care homes safely and protect care home staff during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. It also includes information on reporting COVID-19 cases, providing care after death and supporting existing residents that may require hospital care. The guidance is intended for care homes, local health protection teams, local authorities, clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) and registered providers of accommodation for people who need personal or nursing care. This includes registered residential care and nursing homes for people with learning disabilities, mental health or other disabilities. [Published 2/04/20. Last updated 2 September 2020].

Last updated on hub: 06 April 2020

Adult social care and COVID-19: assessing the impact on social care users and staff in England so far

The Health Foundation

An overview of the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on social care in England, describing how the pandemic unfolded in the social care sector from March until June 2020, and examining the factors that contributed to the scale and severity of outbreaks in care homes. The briefing also attempts to quantify the disruption to health and social care access from February until the end of April 2020. The findings demonstrate that the pandemic has had a profound impact on people receiving and providing social care in England – since March, there have been more than 30,500 deaths among care home residents than it would be normally expected, and a further 4,500 excess deaths among people receiving care in their own homes (domiciliary care); and while deaths in care homes have now returned to average levels for this time of year, the latest data (up until 19 June) shows that there have continued to be excess deaths reported among domiciliary care users. Social care workers are among the occupational groups at highest risk of COVID-19 mortality, with care home workers and home carers accounting for the highest proportion (76%) of COVID-19 deaths within this group. The analysis also shows that there was a substantial reduction in hospital admissions among care home residents which may have helped reduce the risk of transmission but potentially increased unmet health needs. The briefing argues that long-standing structural issues have exacerbated the crisis in social care and hindered the response to the pandemic. It suggests that action is needed now to prevent further harm including by filling the gaps in data, particularly for those receiving domiciliary care, and by developing a new data strategy for social care.

Last updated on hub: 03 August 2020

Adult social care and COVID-19: assessing the policy response in England so far

The Health Foundation

An analysis of national government policies on adult social care in England related to COVID-19 between 31 January and 31 May 2020. This briefing considers the role that social care has played in the overall policy narrative and identifies the underlying factors within the social care system, such as its structure and funding, that have shaped its ability to respond. It suggests that overall, central government support for social care came too late – some initial policies targeted the social care sector in March but the government's COVID-19: adult social care action plan was not published until 15 April and another month passed before the government introduced a dedicated fund to support infection control in care homes. Protecting and strengthening social care services, and stuff, appears to have been given far lower priority by national policymakers than protecting the NHS and policy action on social care has been focused primarily on care homes and risks leaving out other vulnerable groups and services. The briefing calls on the Government to learn from the first phase of the COVID-19 response to prepare for potential future waves of the virus. Short-term actions should include greater involvement of social care in planning and decision making, improved access to regular testing and PPE, and a commitment to cover the costs of local government’s COVID-19 response. Critically, more fundamental reform of the social care system is needed to address the longstanding policy failures exacerbated by COVID-19.

Last updated on hub: 03 August 2020

Adult Social Care COVID-19 Taskforce: Self Directed Support (SDS) Advisory Group report

Department of Health and Social Care

This is the report of the Self Directed Support (SDS) Advisory Group, established to make recommendations to feed into the work of the Social Care Sector COVID -19 Support Taskforce. The Advisory Group looked specifically at what was needed to ensure that people who self direct their care and/or support (for themselves or a family member) are able to maintain their wellbeing, safety and independence during the COVID-19 pandemic. The report aligns its recommendations to seven ‘I’ statements, covering: 1. Rights – there needs to be specific guidance/ training on human rights in relation to Covid-19 with proactive safeguarding in place where needed; 2. Trust – implementation of existing Government guidance needs to be robustly monitored with statutory organisations being held to account if this doesn’t translate into people’s experiences; 3. Information – information needs to be available at a local level that is joined up across different agencies and developed with people who self-direct their support; 4. Practical Support – the offer of practical support should result from a coordinated effort and not be left to chance; 5. Connection – there needs to be coordinated and concerted activity to ensure people have opportunities for connection; 6. Balance – there needs to be coordinated and concerted activity to ensure people are contacted in a supportive way, on a regular basis should they wish, to check how they are doing; 7. Choice - where services are closed there should be alternatives offered or the ability to choose to use that element of PB/PHB in a different way.

Last updated on hub: 21 September 2020