COVID-19 resources on infection control

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Best interests decisions: A COVID-19 quick guide

Social Care Institute for Excellence

This quick guide aims to help people across social care and health settings to apply its provisions about making best interests decisions in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Last updated on hub: 16 July 2020

Evolution and impact of COVID-19 outbreaks in care homes: population analysis in 189 care homes in one geographic region

medRxiv

This article is a preprint and has not been peer-reviewed. The lead researcher is Jennifer K Burton. Method: Analysis of testing, cases and deaths using linked care-home, testing and mortality data for 189 care-homes with 5843 beds in a large Scottish Health Board up to 15/06/20. Findings: 70 (37.0%) of care-homes experienced a COVID-19 outbreak.Interpretation: The large impact on excess deaths appears to be primarily a direct effect of COVID-19, with cases and deaths are concentrated in a minority of care homes. A key implication is that there is a large pool of susceptible residents if community COVID-19 incidence increases again. Shielding residents from potential sources of infection and rapid action into minimise outbreak size where infection is introduced will be critical in any wave 2.

Last updated on hub: 15 July 2020

Disparities in the impact of COVID-19 in Black and Minority Ethnic populations: review of the evidence and recommendations for action

Independent Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies

A review of the evidence on the reasons why more people from black and ethnic minority (BME) backgrounds appear to be at greater risk of hospitalisation and deaths with COVID-19. The review suggests that the reasons are complex with interplay between socio-economic disadvantage in BME populations, high prevalence of chronic diseases and the impact of long-standing racial inequalities being key explanations. Specifically, people from disadvantaged backgrounds or deprived areas, and BME backgrounds are more likely to have shorter life expectancies as a result of their socioeconomic status; housing conditions, including overcrowding is also likely to have had an impact on vulnerability to COVID-19; ethnic minorities have been over-represented in key worker jobs with increased the risk of exposure, infection and death; racial inequalities has been a recurring theme with doctors and nurse surveys experiencing difficulty getting access to personal protection equipment; the adverse social and economic consequences of COVID-19 have been greater on ethnic minority groups. The report makes a number of recommendations to address the greater risk of adverse health outcomes in BME populations. These include recommendations with immediate impact on the course of the pandemic (to mitigate the differential risk of exposure, infection and transmission, and to inform local outbreak control strategies) and longer-term action to reduce health and employment inequalities.

Last updated on hub: 15 July 2020

Your health and well-being

Social Care Wales

This health and wellbeing resource has been developed to support care workers to stay well and seek help and support when needed. Responding to the COVID-19 pandemic means care workers are working regularly under pressure and in unfamiliar and rapidly changing circumstances. The resource provides a direct link to tools, websites and other useful resources to support mental and physical wellbeing; it also includes information about general support groups and services you can access. Topics covered include: maintaining physical wellbeing; good mental wellbeing; general support services and groups; financial wellbeing; advice for pregnant workers; support for managers; general resources; and blogs and articles.

Last updated on hub: 15 July 2020

Coronavirus (COVID-19) and the Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) population in Wales

Welsh Government

This article summarises findings from a range of analyses relating to the Black, Asian and minority ethnic group (BAME) population in Wales. It focuses on areas where the impact of the Coronavirus (COVID-19) and/or the subsequent preventative measures may disproportionately affect the BAME population. These include employment, including occupations at higher risk and critical key workers; housing, including overcrowded housing and homelessness; and relative poverty and deprivation. The analysis shows that the proportion of critical workers from a BAME background was slightly higher than the proportion of all in employment; people from a number of Black, Asian or Minority ethnic groups are more likely to live in overcrowded housing than White British people; of those households who applied to local authorities in 2018-19 for housing assistance because they were threatened with homelessness, 8 per cent were from a Black or Ethnic minority background; people who are living in households in Wales where the head of the household is from a non-white ethnic group are more likely to be in relative income poverty; people from a BAME background were markedly more likely to be living in deprived areas.

Last updated on hub: 14 July 2020

Care homes analysis

Department of Health and Social Care

This paper provides an assessment of evidence on care homes, including optimal approaches to testing, and the potential value of other protection approaches. It reveals that some local authorities (i.e. Liverpool, Oxfordshire) have suffered higher numbers of outbreaks than might have been expected given the number of care homes locally. Nursing home have consistently higher rates of reporting outbreaks than care homes. Both residential and nursing homes show an increase as home size increases. Examining the effectiveness of approaches to reducing rates of infection, the paper stresses that testing can only support reduction of infection rates if coupled with actions to reduce contacts with positive cases and infection control more generally. It acknowledges that despite the potential reduction in risk of the non-rotation of care workers, there may be multiple operational challenges to achieving this. Cohorting of residents to receive care from a small number of carers has the potential to reduce transmission through limiting contacts. If this can be implemented easily, without creating other risks, it has the potential to reduce risk of infection. As the picture is developing rapidly and, as new evidence or data emerges, some of the information in this paper may have been superseded.

Last updated on hub: 14 July 2020

Achieving residential care business success: moving beyond COVID-19

CoolCare

Coming from a range of backgrounds of working and investing in residential care provision, the panellists in this webinar offer practical ideas on how residential care businesses can move through the coronavirus crisis as well sharing their views on the future of the market. The webinar provides advice and guidance on a multitude of topics, including: new care home design and layout trends to boost enquiry conversions and infection control; the power technology is having on restoring consumer confidence when placing a loved one; and new staffing processes that are been implemented to boost compliance and minimise risk.

Last updated on hub: 13 July 2020

The Health Service and Social Care Workers (Scrutiny of Coronavirus-related Deaths) Directions 2020

Department of Health and Social Care

These directions ensure that NHS trusts and NHS foundation trusts seek and prioritise the services of medical examiners to scrutinise the deaths of health service and adult social care staff from coronavirus. Examiners are required to consider whether there is reason to suspect that the death was a result of the person being exposed to coronavirus during the course of their NHS or social care work

Last updated on hub: 13 July 2020

Delivering safe, face-to-face adult day care

Social Care Institute for Excellence

As the restrictions of COVID-19 lockdown are eased, this guide aims to support you, day care managers, social workers, commissioners and providers, to restart or continue activities.

Last updated on hub: 10 July 2020

Coronavirus (COVID-19): adult care homes visiting guidance

Scottish Government

This guidance sets out how care home visiting in Scotland may be re-introduced while minimising the risks to residents, staff and visitors. It takes a staged approach, where stage 1 – essential visits only - has been in operation throughout the COVID-19 pandemic. The guide sets out how relaxation of visiting restrictions will take place in three further stages, moving through outdoor visiting, indoor visiting by one designated person and eventually to a controlled programme of outdoor and indoor visiting. It explains what precautions will be taken to safeguard resident, visitor and staff safety.

Last updated on hub: 09 July 2020

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