COVID-19 resources on infection control

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Guidance for those under 25 who provide care for someone

Department of Health and Social Care

This guidance is for young carers and young adult carers and will also be helpful for those who provide services to support young people who provide care. It provides information and advice to help young carers understand the changes they need to make during the coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak and signposts the help available. It builds on previously published guidance for those who provide unpaid care to friends or family and is also available as an easy read version. The content covers: definition of young carers and young adult carers; knowing how to help stop coronavirus spreading and caring for others; staying well and keeping safe on the internet; concerns about money, accessing support, food and medication; studying at home, resources to help, contact with school; how to continue to support when not living at home; and where to get further support – helplines and websites.

Last updated on hub: 07 July 2020

Leading in isolation during Covid-19

King's Fund

Lesley Flatley shares the challenges of leading an independent residential home during the pandemic and the feeling of isolation and loneliness that social care leaders may experience without the support of a large organisation like the NHS. The blog also looks at the actions and strategies they implemented to address and support the emotional and mental wellbeing of staff and residents and reflects on the lessons learned, including the role of technology.

Last updated on hub: 07 July 2020

Exploiting isolation: offenders and victims of online child sexual abuse during the COVID-19 pandemic

European Union Agency for Law Enforcement Cooperation

This report examines activities involving the sexual abuse and exploitation of children online and related offline crimes with a particular focus on how offenders have used their time during COVID-19 confinement to increase children’s vulnerability. The findings of this report are mainly based on contributions from Member States and Europol’s partner countries and input from a number of organisations. Key findings are: there have been significant increases in activity relating to child sexual abuse and exploitation on both the surface web and dark web during the COVID-19 lockdown period; travel restrictions and other measures during the pandemic have likely prevented offenders from travelling and so have shifted their focus to the exchange of child sexual abuse material (CSAM) online; an increase in the number of offenders exchanging CSAM online during lockdown may have an impact on and stimulate demand for this type of material online beyond the lockdown; increases in detection and reporting of CSAM on the surface web during lockdown indicate the level of re-victimisation of children through the distribution of images and videos depicting them; consistent levels of activity by offenders on the dark web during lockdown reflects the ongoing organised business model that has evolved and the level of threat that it poses to children; society, including law enforcement, needs to focus on the self-generation of CSAM to ensure that children are protected from this type of exposure to harm; the increased circulation of CSAM during the COVID-19 pandemic will also increase the need for law enforcement to identify the victims depicted in it; it is critical to continue to promote preventive and educational initiatives in a coordinated and structural manner across Europe.

Last updated on hub: 06 July 2020

Helping adult day centres to ‘unlock lockdown’. Part 1: planning practically for re-opening

King's College London

This document covers some of the practicalities of re-opening adult day centres as COVID-19 control measures are eased. It draws on guidance related to the pandemic, on broader guidance relating to social care, and relevant advice and action points for regulated settings (such as early years day care and care homes), some of which is also relevant to adult day centres. There is strong evidence that attending a day centre brings quality of life and so, despite risks, enabling people to have the choice of going to a day centre is something worthwhile. The document covers: infection control; communications; supporting service users, carers, staff and volunteers, and centre managers and coordinators; final things that managers and coordinators are likely to want to consider doing before re-opening; practical scenario planning tool. Part 2 of these guidance prompts reflection on what has happened during lockdown, what else centre managers and coordinators may wish to think about, the process of moving forwards and any learning that will be helpful for the future. Individual sections can be completed according to the stage you are in.

Last updated on hub: 06 July 2020

Helping adult day centres to ‘unlock lockdown’. Part 2: reflecting about what has happened, our ‘journey’ during closure and the future of our service

King's College London

This tool prompts adult day centre managers and coordinators to reflect on what has happened during COVID-19 lockdown, the process of moving forwards and any learning that will be helpful for the future. There is strong evidence that day centres are valued by the people who attend and that they improve their quality of life. They help people to stay living at home and provide family members with help in their caring role. They play an important part in preventing loneliness and social isolation. They can also be part of the recovery from the coronavirus pandemic. The reflective points suggested in this tool may help mangers and coordinators think about the reasons for making this effort to restarting the recovery journey. Part 1 of this guidance covers some of the practicalities of re-opening, focusing on infection control, communications, supporting service users, carers, staff and volunteers, and planning.

Last updated on hub: 06 July 2020

Severe mental illness and Covid-19: service support and digital solutions

Rethink Mental Illness

This briefing shares insights on service support for people with mental illness and digital solutions during the pandemic, drawing on online research with service users, as well as information from services. The paper sets out some of the challenges people severely affected by mental illness have faced during the pandemic and poses questions and suggestions on how they could be addressed, and how services can adapt to this new environment. It shows that service users are struggling with the delivery of remote services, or have seen a drop off in the level of support they have received. A concerning number have received no support at all. The briefing makes a series of recommendations on change to delivery of services and digital solutions: policy solutions for digitally excluded people are urgently required and should be a priority for NHS England and the government; as lockdown restrictions are lifted, digital and telephone consultations should continue to be provided, but only as an enhancement of options for service users who prefer this method; service users must be involved in designing and delivering mental health services during and post-pandemic.

Last updated on hub: 06 July 2020

The impact of COVID-19 lockdown measures on the physical health of people living with severe mental illness

Rethink Mental Illness

This briefing looks at the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic on the physical health of people living with severe mental illness (SMI), based on the responses to a survey of 1,434 people. The briefing highlights key findings and outlines concerns about the implications of lockdown restrictions on people with severe mental illness, who already die on average 15 to 20 years earlier than the general population. Over half of respondents have been exercising less and eating less healthily during lockdown and said they were eating less healthily than usual. Respondents reported that they were smoking (16%) and drinking (23%) more than usual and a small proportion also said they were using more illicit drugs (3%) – these were likely used as coping strategies or to alleviate boredom. The paper recommends reinstating physical health checks for people with SMI and relevant system targets; co-producing targeted communications with people severe mental illness; gathering lessons from the implementation of the Community Mental Health Framework; addressing the needs of those with SMI in the government emerging obesity strategy linked to COVID-19.

Last updated on hub: 06 July 2020

Coronavirus (COVID-19): supporting residents in retirement housing and extra care housing who experience loneliness. An A-Z of examples

Housing LIN

This briefing highlights how the retirement, sheltered and extra care housing sectors are working closely with extremely vulnerable residents who experience loneliness during the COVID-19 lockdown. It sets out who is deemed extremely vulnerable and, in the light of Government guidance, has been on shielding – for these people, the period of isolation, alone or with one companion, has led to increasing stress, anxiety and loneliness. The briefing captures an A-Z of creative ways in which operators have organised activities to combat loneliness and foster greater connectedness amongst residents within schemes and/or the wider community, including acts of acts of kindness.

Last updated on hub: 02 July 2020

Report 01: findings from the first 1500 participants on parent/carer stress and child activity

Emerging Minds

This report is based upon the data from the first 1,500 parents and carers who have taken part in an online survey tracking the mental health of school-aged children and young people aged 4-16 years throughout the COVID-19 crisis. These participants completed the survey during a 6-day period, between Monday 30th March and Saturday 4th April – for most young people, this will have been the last week of the school term prior to the Easter holiday. The report focuses on the parent and carer stress and how children and young people are reported to spend their time. The report indicates that the top three stressors for parents and carers were work, their children’s wellbeing, and their family and friends (outside their household); early two third of parents and carers reported that they were not sufficiently meeting the needs of both work and their child; just over half the children and young people completed 2 or more hours of schoolwork per day; nearly three quarter of children and young people are keeping in contact with friends via video chat; and round three quarter of children and young people are getting more than 30 minutes of exercise per day.

Last updated on hub: 01 July 2020

Report 02: Covid-19 worries, parent/carer stress and support needs, by child special educational needs and parent/carer work status

Emerging Minds

This report provides cross-sectional data from the approximately 5,000 parents and carers who, between 30/03/20 and 29/04/20, have taken part in an online survey tracking the mental health of school-aged children and young people aged 4-16 years throughout the COVID-19 crisis. The report focuses on the following outcomes: parent and carer reported child worries related to COVID-19; parent and carer sources of stress; support and disruptions; parent and carer need for support; and parent and carer preference for the medium of delivery of support. The report reveals that nearly half the parents/carers thought that their child was concerned about family and friends catching the virus; around a third of parents/carers reported that their child was worried about missing school; work is the most frequent source of stress for parents, followed by their child’s emotional wellbeing; parents of children with special educational needs and neurodevelopmental disorders (SEN/ND) report higher levels of stress across all areas; while child behaviour is rarely a stressor for parents of non-SEN/ND children, it was frequently a stressor for parents of children with SEN/ND; 4 in 5 of those who were previously receiving support from services have had this stopped or postponed during the pandemic; parents particularly want support around their child’s emotional wellbeing, education and coming out of social isolation; parents of children with SEN/ND would also like support around managing their child’s behaviour; and parents and carers would value online written materials and videos, while parents with children with SEN/ND would also like online support from professionals.

Last updated on hub: 01 July 2020

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