COVID-19 resources on infection control

Results 251 - 260 of 394

Order by    Date Title

Mitigation of risks of COVID-19 in occupational settings with a focus on ethnic minority groups – consensus statement from PHE, HSE and FOM

Public Health England

Consensus statement from Public Health England (PHE), Health and Safety Executive (HSE ) and the Faculty of Occupational Medicine (FOM) on the mitigation of risks of COVID-19 in occupational settings with a focus on ethnic minority groups.

Last updated on hub: 24 November 2020

Mortality associated with COVID-19 in care homes: international evidence

International Long-term Care Policy Network

This document focuses on mortality associated with COVID-19 in care homes, summarising information from three types of sources: epidemiological studies, official estimates and news reports; and relies on national experts for confirmation of sources and definitions. Key findings include: official publicly available data on the numbers of deaths among care home residents linked to COVID-19 is not available in many countries; international comparisons are difficult due to differences in testing capabilities and policies, different approaches to recording deaths, and differing definitions of what constitutes a “care home”; there are three main approaches to quantifying deaths in relation to COVID-19: deaths of people who test positive (before or after their death), deaths of people suspected to have COVID-19 (based on symptoms or epidemiologically linked), and excess deaths (comparing total number of deaths with those in the same weeks in previous years); another important distinction is whether the data covers deaths of care home residents or only deaths in the care home; based on the data gathered for this report, the current average of the share of all COVID-19 deaths that were care home residents is 46% (based on 21 countries); the share of all care home residents who have died (linked to COVID-19) ranges from 0.01% in South Korea to over 4% (which would mean that over one in 25 care home residents have died linked to COVID-19) in Belgium, Ireland, Spain, the UK and the US; currently, there is limited evidence from anywhere in the world on how individuals who receive care in the community have been directly or indirectly affected by COVID-19.

Last updated on hub: 04 November 2020

Moving practice online: knowledge exchange for social service practitioners adapting to the covid -19 context

A summary of responses to a knowledge exchange held with social service practitioners in New Zealand on how they were adapting their practice to ensure physical distancing during the coronavirus (Covid-19) pandemic. Practitioners described many ways that their processes, practices and technologies were changing in order to continue their work. The document provides a brief overview paragraph summarising each area of practice adaptation and a list of ideas from practitioners. Four areas of practice adaptation are covered: engaging in direct practice - including managing potential risks related to heightened family stresses and the possibilities of family violence; managing service user pathways, including managing new referrals; ethical and cultural issue, such as balancing user needs with the need to reduce the spread of the virus; and staff issues relating to staff protections, work practices that reduce spread of the virus.

Last updated on hub: 07 May 2020

National Care Forum COVID-19 guidance and resources

National Care Forum

The COVID-19 section of the National Care Forum (NCF) website is a good source for government guidance and information relevant to the care sector. The resource includes links to information about: infection control, CPA Visitors’ Protocol, clinical guidance, regulation, information governance, workforce, supported housing and homeless, volunteering wellbeing and other practical resources.

Last updated on hub: 20 August 2020

National Care Forum infection, prevention and control (IPC) compliance assessment tool

National Care Forum

This compliance assessment is a simple tool which has been developed using the most recent information on infection prevention and control (IPC) from the CQC and others. It will help care providers know how well they are doing, identify areas in which they need to improve and bring the guidance together into one place. This completion of an assessment using this tool will also provide the evidence that they need to satisfy the CQC requirements and will help ensure services are prepared and in a strong position to manage any ‘second wave’ of COVID-19, or indeed, other yet unknown pressures. There are 8 sections to the tool covering the management of visitors, social distancing, admissions, PPE, testing, premises, staffing and policy. Each section contains a description of what is important to consider and examples of evidence that could be seen as good practice.

Last updated on hub: 28 September 2020

NICE guidance: preventing infection and promoting wellbeing

Skills for Care

This webinar – delivered by NICE – focuses on two areas of NICE guidance: helping to prevent infection and promoting positive mental wellbeing, considering the particular challenges for social care during the COVID-19 pandemic. The webinar also covers NICE COVID-19 rapid guidelines and NICE social care quick guides.

Last updated on hub: 29 June 2020

Novel coronavirus (COVID19) standard operating procedure: COVID-19 vaccine deployment programme: frontline social care workers (JCVI Priority Cohort 2)

NHS England

This standard operating procedure (SOP) outlines the process for facilitating COVID-19 vaccination for frontline social care workers (excluding those working in care homes for older adults) as defined by the JCVI. This includes the identification of eligible care workers and the roles and responsibilities within local systems for enabling and supporting care workers to be vaccinated. The SOP also outlines how Hospital Hubs, Vaccination Centres and Local Vaccination Services should work to deliver COVID-19 vaccination to frontline social care workers at pace. It covers how they should work in partnership to match vaccination capacity to meet demand, support booking, on the day arrangements and data capture to monitor uptake. It does not cover the clinical delivery of the vaccine, which is covered in separate guidance.

Last updated on hub: 19 January 2021

Nursing home design and COVID-19: balancing infection control, quality of life, and resilience

Journal of the American Medical Directors Association

Many nursing home design models can have a negative impact on older people and these flaws have been compounded by Coronavirus Disease 2019 and related infection control failures. This article proposes that there is now an urgent need to examine these architectural design models and provide alternative and holistic models that balance infection control and quality of life at multiple spatial scales in existing and proposed settings. Moreover, this article argues that there is a convergence on many fronts between these issues and that certain design models and approaches that improve quality of life, will also benefit infection control, support greater resilience, and in turn improve overall pandemic preparedness.

Last updated on hub: 07 December 2020

Opening schools safely in the COVID-19 era: school social workers’ experiences and recommendations: a research brief for policymakers

University of California

This policy brief presents data from a national survey of school social workers (SSWs) exploring the impacts of COVID-19 school disruptions in the United States. It highlights the need to address hunger, housing instability, health, mental health and other challenges that a high proportion of students are experiencing, especially low-income students. From a capacity perspective, SSWs in the study report that sizable proportions of students are suffering from difficulties due to discrimination, family discord, child abuse, language difficulties, and community violence; SSWs are called to perform the same Herculean tasks that face other educators and school staff in this pandemic but there are concerns that this work is being done with few resources, outside supports, or governmental guidance; greater supports, like the personal protective equipment (PPE) given to health care professions, are needed for educational staff and social workers who are on the front lines of the pandemic. The paper argues that given SSWs’ ecological view and historical commitment to under-served communities, their voices should be heard in planning school reopening. Based on the findings from the survey, the brief recommends the following actions: create a rapid-response team of school professionals from multiple fields to develop a systemic, national response to support schools; prioritise the response to the most hard-hit schools and communities; develop three evidence-driven national plans, one for in-person instruction, one for online, and one for a hybrid; provide additional supports and resources, including more trained social workers sent to the most stressed schools and communities.

Last updated on hub: 20 August 2020

Opening schools safely in the COVID-19 era: school social workers’ experiences and recommendations: technical report

University of California

This report summarises initial findings from a national survey of school social workers’ (SSWs) (n=1,275) practising across the United States. Findings highlight serious challenges facing schools, school staff, and students. Some of these challenges are specifically related to educational goals, but many are related to basic needs that are a prerequisite to academic and social emotional learning. Many SSWs reported having limited to no contact with some of their students because they couldn’t establish a connection with them during the shutdown; they expressed significant concerns about the motivation and engagement of the 81% of students with whom they did work; and reported that a majority of their students and families had profound, immediate, and urgent needs related to food insufficiency (62.4%), housing instability (42.8), health issues (61.6%), individualised student tutoring (62.3%), and mental health services (75.7%). While findings speak to the dynamism and creativity of SSWs in this pandemic, findings also revealed many troubling and serious issues that need immediate attention as schools plan how to re-open in the fall. Implications for professional development, district supports, university training, and a national effort to reconnect a potential “lost generation of students” are discussed and outlined. The report makes a series of recommendations, including a call to action for the various school social work organisations to join together to help SSWs and their school communities respond effectively as the pandemic continues to impact on the academic and social experience of children.

Last updated on hub: 20 August 2020

Order by    Date Title