COVID-19 resources on infection control

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Flexible responses during the Coronavirus crisis: rapid evidence gathering

Cordis Bright

This report presents findings from a rapid gathering of evidence in relation to the responses to the Covid-19 pandemic by local services and systems supporting people experiencing multiple disadvantage across England. For many people facing multiple disadvantage a series of variations were put in place over this period in the support available to them, including in substance misuse services, criminal justice, homelessness and housing services, mental health services, and support for women. This rapid research sought to understand and document the types of changes, adaptations and flexibilities that have been introduced; how those decisions were reached and who was involved; the impact the changes are having on local services and systems and people facing multiple disadvantage; and what local areas are doing to evidence these changes. The study finds that positive impacts of the changes and flexibilities introduced include: clients adapting and engaging well; safe and sustained accommodation placements for rough sleepers; increased client autonomy; increased trust in individuals and services; increased engagement with substance misuse services; effective self-management of medication; positive mental health outcomes for some people where additional and appropriate support is available. The report also examines the negative impacts that local responses had on users of services, which include: social isolation, anxiety and poor mental health; people experienced ‘knock back’ to progress and improvement in outcomes prior to the crisis; loss of meaningful activity; less positive experiences of emergency accommodation; challenges of engaging in remote support; exclusion of vulnerable people who are not “verified” as rough sleeping.

Last updated on hub: 25 June 2020

Responding to the ‘Shadow Pandemic’: practitioner views on the nature of and responses to violence against women in Victoria, Australia during the COVID-19 restrictions

Monash University

This report presents the findings from a survey to capture the voices and experiences of practitioners responding to women experiencing violence during the COVID-19 shutdown in Victoria, Australia. With more people confined to their homes to reduce the community spread of COVID-19, there is a greater risk of violence against women and children. The analysis of practitioner responses to the survey found that the pandemic has led to: an increase in the frequency and severity of violence against women (VAW); an increase in the complexity of women’s needs; for 42 per cent of respondents, an increase in first-time family violence reporting by women; enhanced tactics to achieve social isolation and forms of violence specifically relating to the threat and risk of COVID-19 infection; for many women experiencing violence during the lockdown period, there was less ability to seek help; service innovations have occurred across Victoria to enhance accessibility and effectiveness of service delivery during the COVID-19 easing of restrictions and recovery phase; numerous challenges to providing support, undertaking effective risk assessment and carrying out safety planning during the COVID-19 shutdown phase. The research also draws attention to the wellbeing considerations for practitioners working remotely to support women experiencing violence during the COVID-19 pandemic, and the need to develop worker supports as restrictions are eased and a period of recovery is entered.

Last updated on hub: 24 June 2020

Providing person-centred support for residents living with dementia who need to be isolated in care homes during the COVID-19 crisis

Association for Dementia Studies, University of Worcester

This information sheet supports care homes catering for people living with dementia during the COVID-19 pandemic. The document covers a range of strategies to help a person living with dementia understand the COVID-19 situation; to create an inviting isolation space; to help occupy the person in an isolation space; to use the environment to encourage isolation; to meet people’s need for human contact; and to encourage a person to comply with infection control requirements. It brings together current best practice, setting out general advice only. Each resident should be assessed on an ongoing and individual basis to find the best response and the latest national sector guidance should be followed.

Last updated on hub: 24 June 2020

COVID-19: visitors’ protocol. CPA Briefing for care providers

Care Provider Alliance

This protocol provides a set of principles and top tips for developing visiting policies in residential settings - to ensure people using care and support have the opportunity to safely receive visitors during the COVID-19 pandemic, while minimising the risk of its introduction to, or spread within, the care setting. The protocol is primarily aimed at care settings which cater for older people, including people with dementia, such as residential and nursing homes. However, it will be of help for other care settings such as those supporting working age people with a range of vulnerabilities, including physical, sensory or learning disabilities. The protocol sets out the principles for considering how to allow visitors in care settings, recognising the importance of finding ways to ensure this is done in a risk-based, balanced way. It examines the types of visits that may be considered, the policies and procedures that are needed, visitor restrictions and ability to suspend visiting, effective communication, and learning as the situation develops. The protocol includes a set of rights and responsibilities for both care providers and visitors which put the welfare and wellbeing of residents / people receiving care at the heart of the approach to developing their visiting policies.

Last updated on hub: 24 June 2020

COVID-19 and Coronavirus evidence alerting. Rapid scan 1: effects on people in care/nursing homes (and other residential facilities) including approaches to protecting workers and residents

NHS Midlands and Lancashire Commissioning Support Unit

This rapid scan collates new and emerging evidence on implications for care homes and residential facilities and transferable lessons from previous pandemics and major incidents. It highlights key papers to inform decisions, policy and planning, and is intended to be pragmatic rather than exhaustive in its coverage. The resource summarises key messages and recurring themes emerging from the evidence – around PPE, reducing the spread, surge planning, staffing, communication, isolation and distancing, and technology – and signposts to expert commentary, key guidance, rapid reviews, lessons from previous pandemics, ongoing studies and other useful resources.

Last updated on hub: 24 June 2020

Personal protective equipment (PPE): resource for care workers working in care homes during sustained COVID-19 transmission in England

Public Health England

This guidance provides advice for care workers working in care homes on the use of personal protective equipment (PPE) during the period of sustained transmission of the coronavirus (COVID-19). The guidance is also relevant for those providing residential supported living. This resource, which has been designed to be accessible to both care workers and providers, has four sections containing: recommendations on the use of PPE for a range of relevant contexts; explanation concerning recommendations and frequently asked questions; specialist advice relating to care for people with learning disabilities and/or autism; and case scenarios designed to illustrate appropriate use of PPE in practice. It should be read in conjunction with the full infection prevention and control (IPC) and PPE government guidance. [Published 17 April 2020; Last updated 7 October 2020]

Last updated on hub: 23 June 2020

Informal home care providers: the forgotten health-care workers during the COVID-19 pandemic

Lancet

Editorial states that during the current coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, informal home care provision and challenges faced by care providers, excluding those who are formal and paid, in the home context have largely been overlooked. Also makes the point that in public health emergencies, informal home care providers are a crucial human resource that improves the community’s health-care capacity, especially in regions with an ageing population and areas with suboptimal health-care systems. The comment piece suggests that for home care to better support health needs during extreme events, urgent research related to social and economic impacts of home care is needed to update policies and improve health support programmes. The piece also provides a list of research priorities relevant to informal home care providers.

Last updated on hub: 20 June 2020

Coronavirus (COVID-19): personal protective equipment (PPE) plan

Department of Health and Social Care

Cross-government UK-wide plan to ensure that critical personal protective equipment (PPE) is delivered to those on the frontline responding to coronavirus (COVID-19). The plan incorporates three strands: 1) guidance – setting out who needs PPE and when, and who does not, based on UK clinical expertise and WHO standards; 2) distribution – making sure those who need PPE can get it and at the right time; and 3) future supply – taking action to secure enough PPE to see services through the crisis, working alongside the industry to boost future supply. [Published 10 April 2020. Last updated 15 April 2020]

Last updated on hub: 18 June 2020

Surviving COVID-19: social work issues in a global pandemic (Child protection and welfare, and social care)

University of Stirling

This briefing provides advice for social workers working with children and families during this coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. The briefing covers what is COVID-19 and its symptoms; what steps do World Health Organisation (WHO) and national and local health advisors advocate people follow in preparedness, mitigation and suppression strategies; how can social workers work with children and families during this pandemic; and how can social workers take care of themselves and others while performing their statutory duties. The briefing also covers how to uphold anti-oppressive practice, ethical behaviour and human rights, home visits and personal protection and protective equipment.

Last updated on hub: 15 June 2020

Care homes and COVID-19: advice and best practice

Social Care Institute for Excellence

Guidance, resources and best practice advice for care homes and care staff during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic.

Last updated on hub: 15 June 2020

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