COVID-19 resources on infection control

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COVID-19 in long-term care facilities: An upcoming threat that cannot be ignored

Perspective published in the Journal of Microbiology, Immunology and Infection in June 2020. The perspective considers the the spread of COVID-19 in long-term care facilities in the United States up to the time of publication. Concludes that infection prevention and control (IPC) polices should be established in long-term care facilities and strictly adhered to in order to prevent this disease from entering these facilities and spreading within and outside of them. Citation: Lai, C. C., et al. (2020). COVID-19 in long-term care facilities: An upcoming threat that cannot be ignored. Journal of Microbiology, Immunology, and Infection, 53(3), 444.

Last updated on hub: 19 October 2020

Recommendations in covid-19 times: a view for home care

Brazilian Journal of Nursing (Revista Brasileira de Enfermagem)

Objective: To suggest recommendations for the practice of Home Nursing in the context of COVID-19. Method: Reflective study, originated from readings associated with the theme, available in current guidelines from the Pan American Health Organization, World Health Organization and the Ministry of Health. Results: Recommendations were developed from current scientific evidence for prevention of infections, control of epidemics and pandemics in the Brazilian home scenario. Final considerations: the reflections achieved contribute to guiding actions for better assistance to the patient, family caregivers and the community in the perspective of safe home care with COVID-19, and it is characterized as an introductory discussion on the theme, encouraging new studies to be carried out from the unfolding of the current scenario.

Last updated on hub: 19 October 2020

How will Brexit affect the UK’s response to coronavirus?

The Nuffield Trust

This briefing looks at how leaving the single market might affect UK health and social care services in the short term as they try to deal with coronavirus while maintaining normal services. It will also look at what difference a deal might make, and the options that the UK and the EU have. The paper makes the following key points: leaving the single market will create new and wide-ranging problems for the majority of NHS medicines and medical devices which come from or via the EU – the coronavirus wave and Brexit stockpiling both created spikes in imported supplies, and filling both requirements at once may be very difficult; export blocks on medically vital supplies by the EU were used during the first wave of coronavirus and could cover the UK after 31 December; the UK will no longer have access to the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC), which collects and shares intelligence on pandemics and other infectious disease outbreaks; based on negotiating documents, draft treaties, and briefing to date, the majority of the crucial issues for health which could have been secured in an agreement are not agreed upon by the two sides, or the outcome is uncertain – these should be given a higher priority in the context of the ongoing pandemic; several important areas for responding to coronavirus depend on cooperative practices and favourable decisions across the EU and UK, beyond simply the presence or absence of a deal; poor funding for public health and social care contributed to limitations in the UK’s capacity to address coronavirus during the first wave – leaving the single market will mean slower growth, making addressing these more difficult though the case to do so remains very strong.

Last updated on hub: 19 October 2020

How Coronavirus has affected people with learning disabilities and autistic people: easy read

Department of Health and Social Care

This report comes from the Social Care Taskforce National Advisory Group: People with Learning Disabilities and Autistic People. The group gives the Government advice about services for people with learning disabilities or autistic people. The report explains how Coronavirus is affecting people with learning disabilities and autistic people; and what the Government should do to keep people safe. This includes new ways of working; accessible information; continuing to support people; helping lonely people and those who are often are left out.

Last updated on hub: 19 October 2020

Right2visit

bemix

This website is for families or close friends having problems visiting a loved one who is autistic and/or has learning disabilities. Visits are being limited or stopped because of COVID-19.

Last updated on hub: 19 October 2020

Lockdown loneliness and anxiety across the generations

The Nuffield Trust

An examination of the impact of lockdown on emotional wellbeing and mental health, by age group, finding that young people tended to fare worse.

Last updated on hub: 19 October 2020

Stories of shielding: life in the pandemic for those with health and care needs

National Voices

Brings together the voices and stories of people with long-term health conditions during COVID-19. The report is based on the submissions to the digital platform Our COVID Voices, which was created for people with health and care needs to share their experiences. The platform received 70 unfiltered views and stories from people at great risk of all the effects of the pandemic, including anxiety, uncertainty and changes to their care. But it goes much deeper, into their relationships, their jobs and dealing with the everyday aspects of life in the pandemic. This document collates quotes from these stories to provide an overview of the real-life experiences of individuals shielding.

Last updated on hub: 15 October 2020

Disability inclusive Covid-19 response

House of Commons Library

This briefing offers an overview of key aspects relating to efforts to include people with disabilities in the Government’s response to the Covid-19 pandemic. Focusing on England, it provides information on the Equality Act 2010, the wearing of face coverings, access to education and health services, employment support and social care during the coronavirus outbreak.

Last updated on hub: 15 October 2020

The experience of older people instructed to shield or self-isolate during the COVID-19 pandemic

English Longitudinal Study of Ageing

19 pandemic A vital weapon in the fight against COVID-19 has been the shielding of clinically extremely vulnerable individuals at high risk, and instructions to clinically vulnerable people at moderate risk to stay at home and avoid face-to-face contact as far as possible. The consequences of this advice for mental health and well-being are not well understood. The English Longitudinal Study of Ageing COVID-19 Substudy provided an opportunity to evaluate impact on mental health, quality of life, social connectedness, worries, and health-related behaviour in more than 5,800 older men and women (mean age 70 years). We found that although most individuals instructed by the NHS or their GPs to isolate and avoid face-to-face contact stayed at home as far as possible (defined as high risk), only 60% were strictly isolating. The high risk participants experienced higher levels of depression, anxiety, and loneliness, and reduced quality of life compared with others, and this was particularly marked among those who were isolating. Poor mental health was not related to reductions in social contacts, but there were higher levels of worry about obtaining food and other essentials. Physical activity was reduced and sleep impaired among high risk participants. The advice to people at risk may have saved lives and reduced infection, but it has come at a cost. If future outbreaks of COVID-19 require the reintroduction of shielding and avoidance of face-to-face contact, efforts should be made to allay concerns and encourage health promoting behaviour so as to avoid further impairment of the quality of life and mental health.

Last updated on hub: 15 October 2020

The experience of older people with multimorbidity during the COVID-19 pandemic

English Longitudinal Study of Ageing

The risk of severe COVID-19 disease is known to be higher in older individuals with multiple long-term health conditions (multimorbidity). In this briefing, we report the latest findings from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing COVID-19 Substudy on the experiences of older people with multimorbidity during the pandemic. Not all people with multimorbidity would be classified as clinically vulnerable. We found that 35% of older individuals with multimorbidity were instructed by the NHS or their GP to shield (staying at home at all times and avoiding any face-to-face contact) on account of their vulnerability, and the majority were largely compliant with this advice. Relative to study members without multimorbidity, respondents with multimorbidity were more likely to report poor sleep quality, eating less, and being worried about not having enough food and other essentials. Unhealthy behaviours (sitting time, physical inactivity etc), poor mental health, and loneliness deteriorated considerably during the lockdown and in the two months following the lockdown. Access to medications among people with multimorbidity was not a problem, however, a fifth of individuals with multimorbidity did not have access to community health, social care services and support from other health professionals (e.g., dentist, podiatrist). When considering policies which advise people to shield or self-isolate because of their COVID-19 risk, it is important for policymakers to acknowledge that older people with multiple long-term health conditions are at higher risk of experiencing greater mental distress and worry, of engaging in unhealthy behaviours and are less likely to access health services when needed; all these factors together could potentially influence disease progression.

Last updated on hub: 15 October 2020

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