COVID-19 resources on infection control

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Adult Social Care Infection Control Fund – round 2: guidance

Department of Health and Social Care

The purpose of this fund is to support adult social care providers, including those with whom the local authority does not have a contract, to reduce the rate of COVID-19 transmission within and between care settings, in particular by helping to reduce the need for staff movements between sites. [Updated 15 January 2021]

Last updated on hub: 05 November 2020

Adult Social Care Infection Control Fund ring-fenced grant 2020: local authority circular

Department of Health and Social Care

Government circular outlining the Adult social care infection control fund, which aims to support adult social care providers to reduce the rate of COVID-19 transmission in and between care homes and support wider workforce resilience. A small percentage of the fund can be used to support domiciliary care providers and support wider workforce resilience to deal with COVID-19 infections. The document is accompanied by five annexes which set out the conditions upon which the grant is paid and the local authorities to whom it will be paid. [First published 9 June 2020. Last updated: 21 September 2020].

Last updated on hub: 08 June 2020

Adult social care winter plan: letter from Minister for Care to local authorities

Department of Health and Social Care

Letter from Helen Whately, Minister for Care, to outline the expectations of local authorities in relation to the adult social care winter plan. The plan sets out the actions the Government is taking at a national level to support those who provide and receive care. It also outlines the actions every local area (local authorities and NHS partners) and every care provider must take to support the collective efforts to keep the coronavirus at bay.

Last updated on hub: 28 September 2020

Adult social care winter preparedness plan 2020-21

Scottish Government

This Plan sets out the winter preparedness measures already in place that must be retained and those that need to be introduced across the adult social care sector in the midst of the global pandemic of COVID-19. The Plan is centred around four key principles: learning from evidence to protect people who use social care support from the direct impact of COVID-19, and wider winter viruses; ensuring that people have good physical and mental health and wellbeing through provision of high quality integrated care services; supporting the social care workforce to enable the delivery of safe support and care and to have positive mental health and wellbeing; working in collaboration to plan and deliver quality care. Within these categories, the Plan provides specific guidance on a range of critical issues such as: infection control; testing and vaccination; PPE; hospital discharge; mental health; staff movement; outbreak management; new funding; and fair work.

Last updated on hub: 11 November 2020

Adult social care: Covid-19: winter plan 2020-2021 newsletter

39 Essex Chambers

This note provides an overview of the Department of Health and Social Care (non-statutory) guidance ‘Adult social care: our COVID-19 winter plan 2020 to 2021’. It discusses the key issues for local authorities, and in particular the interplay with the wellbeing principles of the Care Act 2014, including managing a potential conflict in terms of the wellbeing of both care home residents and those in the community with care and support needs as regards prevention of C-19. It also looks at the implications of the winter plan for the right to respect for family and private life, addressing the tension between the imperative to protect the health of social care users (and the social care workforce) and the need to respect the family life and private life rights of those who might be subject to protective restrictions. Finally, it explores the impact of the winter plan on deprivation of liberty safeguards, in particular in relation to testing and 14-day isolation requirements.

Last updated on hub: 06 October 2020

Adult social care: our COVID-19 winter plan 2020 to 2021

Department of Health and Social Care

This policy paper sets out the key elements of national support available for the social care sector for winter 2020 to 2021, as well as the main actions to take for local authorities, NHS organisations, and social care providers, including in the voluntary and community sector. It covers four themes: preventing and controlling the spread of infection in care settings; collaboration across health and care services; supporting people who receive social care, the workforce, and carers; and supporting the system. Each section sets out the Department of Health and Social Care’s offer of national support and the department’s expectations for adult social care providers alongside published guidance. The plan applies to all settings and contexts in which people receive adult social care. This includes people’s own homes, residential care homes and nursing homes, and other community settings.[Published 18 September 2020. Last updated 20 November 2020]

Last updated on hub: 21 September 2020

Advice and guidance on discharging COVID-19 positive patients to care homes

Royal College of Physicians

A brief summary of current advice and guidance about discharging patients to care homes. The main points are that: patients should be discharged as soon as they are fit, whether they are COVID-19 positive or not; COVID-19 positive patients being discharged into a care home setting can only be discharged into care homes that have been designated safe by the CQC – if their own care home is not COVID-19 safe, they need to be discharged into alternative accommodation; it is the responsibility of the local authority to find alternative accommodation.

Last updated on hub: 09 November 2020

Age-friendly health systems design to address COVID-19

Institute for Healthcare Improvement

Advice to help limit the exposure of older adults to coronavirus (COVID-19) by reducing their need to present to the hospital, reducing hospitalisations and, if hospitalised or in post-acute or long-term care community, increase the rate of safe discharges. It provides advice for professionals working in the community, in emergency departments and hospitals, and in long-term care.

Last updated on hub: 05 May 2020

An avoidable crisis: the disproportionate impact of Covid-19 on Black, Asian and minority ethnic communities

Labour Party

A report of a review into how people from Black, Asian and minority ethnic backgrounds have been impacted by Covid-19. The pandemic is having a disproportionate and devastating impact on ethnic minority communities. Not only are Black, Asian and minority ethnic people dying at a disproportionate rate, they are also overexposed to the virus and more likely to suffer the economic consequences. The report argues that, despite repeated warnings, the Government has failed to take sufficient action. Covid-19 has thrived on inequalities that have long scarred British society. Black, Asian and minority ethnic people are more likely to work in frontline or shutdown sectors which have been overexposed to Covid-19, more likely to have co-morbidities which increase the risk of serious illness and more likely to face barriers to accessing healthcare. Black, Asian and minority ethnic people have also been subject to disgraceful racism as some have sought to blame different communities for the spread of the virus. The virus has exposed the devastating impact of structural racism. The report makes both immediate and long-term recommendations to protect those most at risk and tackle structural inequalities in several key areas including the machinery of government, health, employment and in the education system.

Last updated on hub: 28 October 2020

An inquiry into the lived experience of Covid-19 in the home care sector in Ireland: the experiences of home care provider organisations

Home and Community Care Ireland

This exploratory research into the health, social and economic impact of the covid-19 pandemic on the eighteen home care provider organisations who responded to a survey sheds light on how those on the forefront of home care coped during one of the largest viral outbreaks in modern history. A questionnaire consisting of ten open-ended questions was developed following a rapid literature review and internal consultations. These questions were categorised under five subheadings: management, service provision, relationships, health and wellbeing, and the future. Key findings include: The most significant problem was workforce shortage – specifically, two thirds of organisations indicated low staffing levels due to a lack of childcare brought about by the closure of schools and creches; almost every third organisation noted a decrease in home care services, ranging from 20-30 per cent, mostly due to clients cocooning and self-isolating; another issue that featured strongly across all responses was related to uncertainty surrounding the pandemic – stress, fear, worry and even panic; almost every other organisation identified Protective Personal Equipment (PPS) to be a significant cause for concern – supply and distribution was a considerably more prevalent issue than the actual cost of PPE; to ensure the smooth running of business at a very chaotic time, all the providers implemented a range of novel policies and procedures – this rapid development of new ways of delivering service safely took place on several interrelated levels; the crisis exposed any structural shortcomings within the home care sector, but equally it brought about a sense of togetherness, cooperation and mutual support within the sector – and beyond it.

Last updated on hub: 09 November 2020

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