COVID-19 resources on infection control

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Staff movement: a risk management framework: briefing for adult care home providers

Care Provider Alliance

This briefing outlines a risk management approach that care homes can use to manage restrictions on staff movements. The briefing relates to CQC registered care homes with or without nursing in England. The Government is introducing legislation that will require care home providers to restrict all but essential movement of staff between settings in order to reduce transmission of COVID-19 – with a particular focus on care home staff. At the same time, care homes are facing staff shortages due to sickness and the ongoing high vacancy rates. A risk management framework can enable care homes to have a discussion with other agencies, such as their regulator or commissioner, about care home staff movement. This framework can assist services to manage the situation and provide operational tools that – over time – can drive down the number of staff movements and hence reduce the transmission of the virus. Many providers have already been pursuing such actions without an overall structure to work within. The briefing highlights the key factors which will affect staff movement over the coming months and which need to be considered within the risk management framework; actions for initial assessment; and how care homes should work with notifiable agencies, including the Care Quality Commission, local authorities and CCG commissioners, to agree contingency arrangements in advance of situations arising.

Last updated on hub: 11 January 2021

Stay at home: guidance for households with possible or confirmed coronavirus (COVID-19) infection

Public Health England

This guidance is intended for: people with symptoms that may be caused by coronavirus, and do not require hospital treatment, who must remain at home until they are well; and those living in households with someone who shows symptoms that may be caused by coronavirus. Also includes specific guidance for households with grandparents, parents and children living together where someone is at increased risk or has possible or confirmed coronavirus (COVID-19) infection. [First published 12 March 2020. Last updated 20 September 2020]

Last updated on hub: 22 July 2020

Staying apart to stay safe: the impact of visit restrictions on long-term care and assisted living survey

Office of the Seniors Advocate

Findings of a five-week survey about the impact of COVID-19 related visitor restrictions at long-term care and assisted living homes. The survey, answered by residents, their family members and the general public, had over 13,000 valid responses. The analysis suggests that most family members and residents support some visit restrictions during the pandemic, although they believe visits should be more frequent and that at least one more visitor for each resident should be permitted. Key findings include: before the pandemic, 55% of families were visiting long-term care and assisted living residents for an hour or more several times per week and even daily; most family members were not aware of the possibility of essential visits during the first four months of visit restrictions, and almost half of the people who did apply for an essential visit were refused; under the current visitation policy, the majority of visits are only once a week or less, and half the visits in long-term care are 30 minutes or less; 30% of current visits are outside only; currently, 65% of visits are observed by staff for some or all of the time; only 21% of visits are in the privacy of the resident’s room (75% of long-term care residents and almost 100% of assisted living residents live in private rooms); 70% of visitors are not allowed to touch their loved one; most visitors are washing their hands, wearing a mask, having their temperature checked, and answering health questions prior to each visit.

Last updated on hub: 11 November 2020

Staying safe during COVID-19: guidance for practitioners working with those who harm

SafeLives

Guidance to help practitioners working with perpetrators of domestic violence during the COVID-19 crisis. The document explores: how to ensure clients get support from family and friends; self-care; general safety planning; structured strategy to help clients de-escalate situations before they become violent or abusive; and supporting support workers.

Last updated on hub: 30 June 2020

Stories of shielding: life in the pandemic for those with health and care needs

National Voices

Brings together the voices and stories of people with long-term health conditions during COVID-19. The report is based on the submissions to the digital platform Our COVID Voices, which was created for people with health and care needs to share their experiences. The platform received 70 unfiltered views and stories from people at great risk of all the effects of the pandemic, including anxiety, uncertainty and changes to their care. But it goes much deeper, into their relationships, their jobs and dealing with the everyday aspects of life in the pandemic. This document collates quotes from these stories to provide an overview of the real-life experiences of individuals shielding.

Last updated on hub: 15 October 2020

Strengthening the health system response to COVID-19: preventing and managing the COVID-19 pandemic across long-term care services in the WHO European Region (May 29, 2020)

World Health Organization Regional Office for Europe

This technical guidance identifies ten policy objectives to prevent and manage COVID-19 infections in long-term care services. It includes proposed actions and examples from across Europe and aims to help decision-makers, policy-makers and national or regional health authorities as they seek ways to prevent and manage the COVID-19 pandemic in long-term care services. The focus is on older people above the age of 65 years who use long-term care services in their homes, day centres or residential homes and nursing homes. The 10 policy objectives cover: Prioritizing the maintenance of LTC services; Mobilizing additional funds; Implementing prevention and control standards; Implementing safety measures that recognise the mutual benefits of the safety of people receiving and providing LTC services; Prioritizing testing, tracing and monitoring the spread of COVID-19; Securing staff and resources; Scaling up support for family caregivers; Coordinate between services; Secure access to dignified palliative care services; and Prioritize the well-being of people receiving and providing LTC services.

Last updated on hub: 28 May 2020

Summary of international policy measures to limit impact of COVID19 on people who rely on the Long-Term Care sector

London School of Economics and Political Science

This working paper provides a summary of measures to limit impact of COVID19 on people who rely on the Long-Term Care sector, compiled from contributions from members of the International Long-Term Care Policy Network. The list of measures is not exhaustive, it only contains examples of measures that have been reported or identified by contributors to the website so far.

Last updated on hub: 28 May 2020

Supervision and social care practice in the time of COVID-19

Research In Practice: Dartington

A suite of resources to support supervision in the context of COVID-19. The pandemic, and consequent need for social distancing, have required a reorganisation of every aspect of social care practice, including supervision. The resources are intended to strengthen the effectiveness of remote supervision, building resilience, working with people who are experiencing grief and loss, as well as thinking about social work in the context of a crisis.

Last updated on hub: 23 July 2020

Supporting children and young people with SEND as schools and colleges prepare for wider opening

Department for Education

Risk assessment guidance for settings managing children and young people with an education, health and care (EHC) plan or complex needs during the coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak, including special schools, specialist colleges, local authorities and any other settings managing children and young people with SEND. [Updated 24 July 2020]

Last updated on hub: 28 July 2020

Supporting individuals with intellectual and developmental disability during the first 100 days of the COVID‐19 outbreak in the USA

Journal of Intellectual Disability Research

Background: It is unknown how the novel Coronavirus SARS‐CoV‐2, the cause of the current acute respiratory illness COVID‐19 pandemic that has infected millions of people, affects people with intellectual and developmental disability (IDD). The aim of this study is to describe how individuals with IDD have been affected in the first 100 days of the COVID‐19 pandemic. Methods: Shortly after the first COVID‐19 case was reported in the USA, the organisation in this study, which provides continuous support for over 11 000 individuals with IDD, assembled an outbreak committee composed of senior leaders from across the health care organisation. The committee led the development and deployment of a comprehensive COVID‐19 prevention and suppression strategy, utilising current evidence‐based practice, while surveilling the global and local situation daily. This study implemented enhanced infection control procedures across 2400 homes, which were communicated to employees using multi‐faceted channels including an electronic resource library, mobile and web applications, paper postings in locations, live webinars and direct mail. Custom‐built software applications were used to track patient, client and employee cases and exposures, and this study leveraged current public health recommendations to identify cases and to suppress transmission, which included the use of personal protective equipment. A COVID‐19 case was defined as a positive nucleic acid test for SARS‐CoV‐2 RNA. Results: In the 100‐day period between 20 January 2020 and 30 April 2020, this study provided continuous support for 11 540 individuals with IDD. Sixty‐four per cent of the individuals were in residential, community settings, and 36% were in intermediate care facilities. The average age of the cohort was 46 ± 12 years, and 60% were male. One hundred twenty‐two individuals with IDD were placed in quarantine for exhibiting symptoms and signs of acute infection such as fever or cough. Sixty‐six individuals tested positive for SARS‐CoV‐2, and their average age was 50. The positive individuals were located in 30 different homes (1.3% of total) across 14 states. Fifteen homes have had single cases, and 15 have had more than one case. Fifteen COVID‐19‐positive individuals were hospitalised. As of 30 April, seven of the individuals hospitalised have been discharged back to home and are recovering. Five remain hospitalised, with three improving and two remaining in intensive care and on mechanical ventilation. There have been three deaths. This study found that among COVID‐19‐positive individuals with IDD, a higher number of chronic medical conditions and male sex were characteristics associated with a greater likelihood of hospitalisation. Conclusions: In the first 100 days of the COVID‐19 outbreak in the USA, this study observed that people with IDD living in congregate care settings can benefit from a coordinated approach to infection control, case identification and cohorting, as evidenced by the low relative case rate reported. Male individuals with higher numbers of chronic medical conditions were more likely to be hospitalised, while most younger, less chronically ill individuals recovered spontaneously at home.

Last updated on hub: 19 October 2020

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