COVID-19 resources on infection control

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Care homes and COVID-19 in Hong Kong: how the lessons from SARS were used to good effect

Age and Ageing

In Hong Kong, about 15% of older people (aged 80 and above) live in care homes, one of the highest proportions in the world. During the spread of severe acute respiratory syndrome in 2003, the crude fatality rate for older people in care homes that were infected was 72%. After taking the advice of a team of international experts, the Hong Kong Government implemented comprehensive preventive measures to cope with the future epidemics. This commentary evaluates the effectiveness of these measures in coping with both influenza outbreaks and COVID-19 and suggests the lessons learnt are relevant to both developed and less developed countries? Lockdown in care homes is very effective under two conditions. Healthcare workers must wear surgical masks in the care home. Hospitals must adopt a strict policy to prevent virus transmission by discharged patients. Care homes situated within high-rise residential towers are particularly vulnerable to COVID-19 transmission; their residents can more easily be infected by asymptomatic carriers from the community. Airborne virus can also be transmitted more swiftly in care homes with open-plan layouts. Lockdown had been shown to significantly reduce influenza outbreaks in care homes. On the other hand, lockdown causes loneliness to residents. Care homes allow residents to move freely within the care home though with the risk of spreading the virus by resident who is an asymptomatic carrier. Finally, lockdown may cause family members to have guilty feelings. Family members can only make video call or window visit to residents.

Last updated on hub: 21 January 2021

Care homes and COVID-19 in Hong Kong: how the lessons from SARS were used to good effect

Age and Ageing

In Hong Kong, about 15% of older people (aged 80 and above) live in care homes, one of the highest proportions in the world. During the spread of severe acute respiratory syndrome in 2003, the crude fatality rate for older people in care homes that were infected was 72%. After taking the advice of a team of international experts, the Hong Kong Government implemented comprehensive preventive measures to cope with the future epidemics. This commentary evaluates the effectiveness of these measures in coping with both influenza outbreaks and COVID-19 and suggests the lessons learnt are relevant to both developed and less developed countries? Lockdown in care homes is very effective under two conditions. Healthcare workers must wear surgical masks in the care home. Hospitals must adopt a strict policy to prevent virus transmission by discharged patients. Care homes situated within high-rise residential towers are particularly vulnerable to COVID-19 transmission; their residents can more easily be infected by asymptomatic carriers from the community. Airborne virus can also be transmitted more swiftly in care homes with open-plan layouts. Lockdown had been shown to significantly reduce influenza outbreaks in care homes. On the other hand, lockdown causes loneliness to residents. Care homes allow residents to move freely within the care home though with the risk of spreading the virus by resident who is an asymptomatic carrier. Finally, lockdown may cause family members to have guilty feelings. Family members can only make video call or window visit to residents.

Last updated on hub: 07 December 2020

Care homes and COVID-19: advice and best practice

Social Care Institute for Excellence

Guidance, resources and best practice advice for care homes and care staff during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic.

Last updated on hub: 15 June 2020

Care homes and supported living: Learning and sharing following the COVID-19 lockdown

Social Care Institute for Excellence

Practice examples and resources to support care home and supported living staff.

Last updated on hub: 11 August 2020

Care homes strategy for infection prevention and control of COVID-19 based on clear delineation of risk zones

Bushproof

This strategy document is meant as a practical aid for care home managers to be able to implement effective infection control in their particular context. It is acknowledged that there will be a whole range of different types and set-ups of care home depending on the level of care required (e.g. nursing, care, sheltered housing), where each which will need a context-based response. However, the idea here is for managers to be able to use/adapt this document for their own context. The strategy is based on and incorporates current UK government guidance. The main sections of the guidance cover: delineation of zones, hand hygiene staff allocation and rotation in relation to zones, use of equipment, entrances and flow, isolation, communal living, residents with dementia and other challenging behaviours, staff clothes from home, showering and personal protective equipment (PPE). The strategy can be downloaded as a Word document from website link. [First published 17 April 2020; Last updated 16 October 2020]

Last updated on hub: 05 June 2020

Care homes: outbreak testing and regular testing

Department of Health and Social Care

Sets out the next stages in the COVID-19 testing strategy for adult social care to be rolled out from 6 July. This letter to the Directors of Public Health and Directors of Adult Social Services covers outbreak management and rapid testing for care homes with outbreaks; retesting in care homes without outbreaks; extra care and supported living; and domiciliary care.

Last updated on hub: 09 July 2020

Care Provider Alliance Coronavirus (COVID-19) directory

Care Provider Alliance

The Care Provider Alliance (CPA) are collating and signposting to the latest guidance and advice from reliable sources on their website. The resource includes news, guidance and information. The site is updated frequently.

Last updated on hub: 20 August 2020

Carers Advisory Group submission to the ASC Sector COVID19 Taskforce: how can we prepare and support carers better?

Department of Health and Social Care

This is the report of the Carers Advisory Group, established to make recommendations to feed into the work of the Social Care Sector COVID -19 Support Taskforce. The evidence (Annex) is drawn from the experience of thousands of unpaid carers, supporting family and friends who are disabled, chronically ill or older; the experience from organisations, local authorities, NHS commissioners, providers of services and researchers; and evidence from employers and their staff networks on support needed for employers and employees to remain in work. The taskforce proposals on advice, connecting, supporting, capacity and sustainability include: overarching recommendations; action that needs to be taken for any local lockdowns or future spikes/waves; immediate and urgent actions – to be taken pre-September 2020; action required for the first phase of winter – up to October 2020; and action required for the second phase of winter – up to March 2021. The overarching recommendation is that Government and leaders should recognise carers early in briefings and communications. The absence of carers when health and care workers were mentioned in news briefings made them feel overlooked, undervalued and confused about what they could access.

Last updated on hub: 21 September 2020

Case studies

Care Home Professional

Brings together innovative examples of good practice in care homes. They case studies cover a range of topics, including responses to Covid-19; quality of care; the use of technology; social activities and entertainment; and helping residents stay connected.

Last updated on hub: 07 September 2020

Caught between two fronts: successful aging in the time of COVID-19

Working with Older People

Purpose: The COVID-19 pandemic poses a great challenge for older people both in terms of the severity of the disease and the negative consequences of social distancing. Assumptions about negative effects on the lives of the elderly, affecting dimensions of successful aging (such as the preservation of social relationships), have thus far been hypothetical and have lacked empirical evidence. The aim of this paper is to shed empirical light on the effects of COVID-19 on the everyday life of older people against the background of the concept of successful aging. Design/methodology/approach: Data of a standardized, representative telephone survey with residents of Lower Austria, a county of Austria, were used for this secondary analysis. The sample included 521 persons of 60 years of age and older. For this paper, contingency analyses (χ² coefficients, z-tests using Bonferroni correction) and unidimensional correlational analyses were calculated. Findings: The empirical data show that successful aging along the three dimensions of successful aging is a challenge in the time of the COVID-19 pandemic – leaving the elderly caught between two fronts. Originality/value: The present work focusses on a unique moment in time, describing the changes to the lives of Austrian elderly because of the social distancing measures imposed to protect against the spread of COVID-19. These changes are discussed in the theoretical framework of successful aging.

Last updated on hub: 29 December 2020

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