COVID-19 resources on infection control

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Home care for patients with COVID-19 presenting with mild symptoms and management of their contacts: interim guidance

World Health Organization

This rapid advice is intended to guide public health and infection prevention and control professionals, health care managers and health care workers when addressing issues related to home care for patients with suspected COVID-19 who present with mild symptoms and when managing their contacts. The guidance is based on evidence about COVID-19 and the feasibility of implementing infection prevention and control measures at home.

Last updated on hub: 29 June 2020

COVID-19: essential training

Skills for Care

The impact of COVID-19 has created an extremely challenging time for the social care workforce. This resource highlights the training that remains a priority during this period to ensure there is a skilled and competent workforce. The essential training, which does not comprise all the training that is usually undertaken, is available as three individual packages of learning: rapid induction programme (aimed at new staff), refresher training (aimed at existing staff) and a volunteer programme. This approach is supported by the Care Quality Commission. A list of endorsed learning providers have received grant funding to support care providers with the cost of this essential training during this period. The page signposts to relevant information and guidance, including training content and to contact details of endorsed learning providers.

Last updated on hub: 29 June 2020

Life after lockdown: tackling loneliness among those left behind

British Red Cross

This report draws on findings from a collection of national-level polling, interviews and evaluations from British Red Cross services during COVID-19 to shed a light on how to refocus efforts on tackling loneliness and supporting those most affected by the crisis. Key findings include: there has been a significant increase in the number of people feeling lonely – since lockdown 41 per cent of UK adults report feeling lonelier; more than a quarter of UK adults agree that they worry something will happen to them and no one will notice; a third of UK adults haven’t had a meaningful conversation in the last week; some communities have been at greater risk of loneliness than others – people from Black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) communities, parents with young children, young people, those living with long term physical and mental health conditions, people on lower incomes and those with limited access to digital technology and the internet; COVID-19 has also meant a loss in social support for refugees and people seeking asylum. To meet the challenges ahead and ensure no one is left behind and feels alone, the report makes a number of recommendations: prioritise those most vulnerable to loneliness; secure sustained funding for tackling loneliness; continue to roll out social prescribing and ensure it delivers for loneliness; work collaboratively across sectors and specialisms, and with people with lived experience of loneliness.

Last updated on hub: 29 June 2020

Home learning during the Covid-19 lockdown: the impact of school closures on care experienced children

Adoption UK

This report examines the challenges of supporting vulnerable children’s learning during the COVID-19 lockdown and makes recommendations for the months ahead. To find out about the impact of school closures on care experienced children, a week-long survey was carried out in April for parents and carers of care-experienced children who would normally be in school. There were 674 responses, which form the basis for this report. The survey revealed that the lockdown has had significant impacts on families, both positive and negative. Some have reported severe challenges, including increases in challenging behaviour, violence and aggression, and concerns about the mental wellbeing of both children and adults in the household. However, some families have reaped positive benefits, enjoying spending more time with their children and having more conversations with them, with many reporting that their children seem calmer without the stress of school. The report argues that planning now for the re-opening of school settings is crucial. It recommends that Governments in all four nations of the UK provide additional funding and resources to help schools support children, include support with learning and with wellbeing. In addition, specific guidance should be given to schools about supporting care experienced children and those with special and additional learning needs during school closures.

Last updated on hub: 29 June 2020

COVID-19: personal assistants

Skills for Care

Find information and guidance for people working as personal assistants directly employed by the person they are supporting. The resource covers: official government guidance; COVID-19 testing for PAs; Personal Protective Equipment (PPE); visiting healthcare inpatient settings during the COVID-19 pandemic; access to learning; sharing COVID-19 experiences; COVID-19 essential training; and useful links, templates and wellbeing resources.

Last updated on hub: 29 June 2020

Distance recruitment

Skills for Care

Face-to-face interviews are being replaced with video calls to maintain social distancing due to COVID-19. A candidate’s experience of the recruitment process will influence their view of the employer and interest in vacancies. This webinar provides tips on effective distance recruitment.

Last updated on hub: 29 June 2020

NICE guidance: preventing infection and promoting wellbeing

Skills for Care

This webinar – delivered by NICE – focuses on two areas of NICE guidance: helping to prevent infection and promoting positive mental wellbeing, considering the particular challenges for social care during the COVID-19 pandemic. The webinar also covers NICE COVID-19 rapid guidelines and NICE social care quick guides.

Last updated on hub: 29 June 2020

Using technology to support the people you care for

Skills for Care

For many vulnerable people who receive care, COVID-19 and the lockdown mean a dramatic reduction in activities and family contact. Staff may also have less free time to spend with the people they support as things change. It is critical to minimise the impact for users of services and their families. This webinar – co-delivered with Digital Social Care – explores how technology can offer some help to connect people and to bring ‘outside experiences’ in.

Last updated on hub: 29 June 2020

Coronavirus and me

Children's Commissioner for Wales

Sets out initial findings of a consultation on the experiences of children and young people in Wales in relation to the COVID-19 pandemic. The consultation captured information about the lives of over 23,700 children between the ages of 3-18 and run for a two-week period during lockdown. It focuses on children’s mental health and wellbeing, their ability to access to support, their education and learning, and their ability to play. The data shows that more than a third of children worried about Coronavirus, having concerns about how long the situation would last and fears that they or their loved ones might catch it. The majority report that they know where to get help for their mental and wellbeing needs but only 39 per cent feel confident seeking school counselling at the current time.

Last updated on hub: 25 June 2020

Safe working in education, childcare and children’s social care settings, including the use of personal protective equipment (PPE)

Department for Education

This guidance applies to staff working in education, childcare and children’s social care settings in England; children, young people and learners who attend these settings; and their parents or carers. It explains the strategy for infection prevention and control, including the specific circumstances PPE should be used, to enable safe working during the coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak. The guidance also looks at the specific steps that should be taken in children’s homes, including secure children’s homes; in foster care settings; when dealing with young children or children with special educational needs; when providing social care visits to extremely clinically vulnerable children and young people. [Published 14 May 2020. Last updated 21 July 2020]

Last updated on hub: 25 June 2020