COVID-19 resources on Home care

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"There is something very personal about seeing someone’s face”: provider perceptions of video visits in home-based primary care during COVID-19

Journal of Applied Gerontology

The rapid deployment of video visits during COVID-19 may have posed unique challenges for home-based primary care (HBPC) practices due to their hands-on model of care and older adult population. This qualitative study examined provider perceptions of video visits during the first wave of the COVID-19 crisis in New York City (NYC) through interviews with HBPC clinical/medical directors, program managers, nurse practitioners/nurse managers, and social work managers (n = 13) at six NYC-area practices. Providers reported a combination of commercial (health system-supported) and consumer (e.g., FaceTime) technological platforms was essential. Video visit benefits included triaging patient needs, collecting patient information, and increasing scheduling capacity. Barriers included cognitive and sensory abilities, technology access, reliance on caregivers and aides, addressing sensitive topics, and incomplete exams. Effectively integrating video visits requires considering how technology can be proactively integrated into practice. A policy that promotes platform flexibility will be crucial in fostering video integration.

Last updated on hub: 18 August 2021

A testing service for homecare workers in England

Department of Health and Social Care

Sets out how homecare agencies in England can order regular tests for their homecare (domiciliary care) staff. NHS Test and Trace is making weekly Covid-19 testing available to all homecare workers in Care Quality Commission (CQC)-registered domiciliary care organisations. The guidance prescribes that agency managers should order tests every 28 days for their homecare workers; four tests are delivered for each homecare worker to the agency, for a 28 day testing cycle; each homecare worker should be given four test kits every 28 days; every 7 days a care worker should take a test, register it online, and return it by post between Thursday and Sunday. Homecare workers will receive their results in 2 to 4 days by email and text message (SMS). This approach aims to: identify homecare workers who currently have Covid-19 so they are able to self-isolate if their result is positive; protects those receiving care from infection passed to them by homecare workers who are confirmed positive; and prevents and controls the spread of the virus by identifying asymptomatic cases. [First published: 20 November 2020; Last updated:1 July 2021]

Last updated on hub: 25 November 2020

ADASS home care and workforce snap survey: September 2021

Association of Directors of Adult Social Services

The ADASS survey was carried out in August 2021 and was completed by 69 Director of Adult Social Services (45% of councils in England). They were asked how waiting lists, homecare hours delivered and people not getting the kind of care they would choose. The report suggests that nearly 300,000 people (294,353) are waiting for social care assessments, care and support or reviews. This figure has increased by just over a quarter (26%) over the last three months. Drilling down into the headline figure - 70,000 people are waiting for care assessments (up from 55,000 at the time of the ADASS Spring Survey 2021). 11,000 people have been waiting for more than six months (compared to 7,000 at the time of the ADASS Spring Survey). The number of hours of care that are needed locally but that there is not the capacity to deliver has doubled over the last six-month period. 13% of people are being offered care and support such as residential care that they would not have chosen, due to recruitment and retention issues. The findings point to funding pressures and delays in assessments from social workers and shows that whilst councils are delivering more care and support in people’s homes, people are waiting longer for vital care assessments and reviews. The findings also suggest that there are fundamental issues relating to hospital discharges, increasing requests for care and support, and the detrimental impact of decision-making on the lives of so many older and disabled people. The findings reaffirm and compound what was found in the earlier ADASS Activity Survey (June 2021) and Spring Survey (July 2021), which showed increasing requests to local authorities for care and support in their own homes, growing levels of unmet need, people waiting longer, and more people missing out on vital care and support.

Last updated on hub: 08 September 2021

Adherence of home‐based Wu Qin Xi programs during the COVID‐19 epidemic in Shanghai

International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry

Details of an exercise intervention published in a letter to the editor. Home‐based exercise programs are widely accepted to improve immunity and prevent infection at home. In the COVID‐19 epidemic particular situation, home‐based exercise programs play a key part in immunity enhancement as well as infection prevention. Authorities selected the Wu Qin Xi (WQX) exercises program because it can can improve the cognitive function, anxiety, depression, sleeping, and balance ability in elderly people. This study investigated the exercise adherence with a sample of 1500 participants. Findings: An important component facilitating the optimal effectiveness of exercise programs is a high level of exercise adherence. Conclusion: is that WQX exercise program was found to be an home‐exercise program that achieves high adherence in elderly adults who lived in these communities during outbreak of the COVID‐19 epidemic in Shanghai.

Last updated on hub: 21 December 2020

Adult social care and COVID-19: assessing the impact on social care users and staff in England so far

The Health Foundation

An overview of the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on social care in England, describing how the pandemic unfolded in the social care sector from March until June 2020, and examining the factors that contributed to the scale and severity of outbreaks in care homes. The briefing also attempts to quantify the disruption to health and social care access from February until the end of April 2020. The findings demonstrate that the pandemic has had a profound impact on people receiving and providing social care in England – since March, there have been more than 30,500 deaths among care home residents than it would be normally expected, and a further 4,500 excess deaths among people receiving care in their own homes (domiciliary care); and while deaths in care homes have now returned to average levels for this time of year, the latest data (up until 19 June) shows that there have continued to be excess deaths reported among domiciliary care users. Social care workers are among the occupational groups at highest risk of COVID-19 mortality, with care home workers and home carers accounting for the highest proportion (76%) of COVID-19 deaths within this group. The analysis also shows that there was a substantial reduction in hospital admissions among care home residents which may have helped reduce the risk of transmission but potentially increased unmet health needs. The briefing argues that long-standing structural issues have exacerbated the crisis in social care and hindered the response to the pandemic. It suggests that action is needed now to prevent further harm including by filling the gaps in data, particularly for those receiving domiciliary care, and by developing a new data strategy for social care.

Last updated on hub: 03 August 2020

Adult Social Care Infection Control Fund ring-fenced grant 2020: local authority circular

Department of Health and Social Care

Government circular outlining the Adult social care infection control fund, which aims to support adult social care providers to reduce the rate of COVID-19 transmission in and between care homes and support wider workforce resilience. A small percentage of the fund can be used to support domiciliary care providers and support wider workforce resilience to deal with COVID-19 infections. The document is accompanied by five annexes which set out the conditions upon which the grant is paid and the local authorities to whom it will be paid. [First published 9 June 2020. Last updated: 21 September 2020].

Last updated on hub: 08 June 2020

Adult social care monthly statistics, England: August 2021

Department of Health and Social Care

Experimental statistics on a range of topics including infection control measures, staffing levels, coronavirus (COVID-19) vaccinations and testing for COVID-19 in adult social care settings. As of 27 July 2021, the proportions who had received both doses of the COVID-19 vaccine were: 93.5% of residents and 78.0% of staff of older adult care homes; 88.5% of residents of younger adult care homes; 75.2% of staff of younger adult care homes, 64.6% of domiciliary care staff and 32.2% of staff employed in other social care settings. In the week ending 28 July 2021: 91.9% of care homes in England were able to accommodate residents receiving visitors within care homes, compared to 40.3% at the beginning of March 2021; 83.8% of care homes who had staff required to self-isolate paid those staff their full wages while self-isolating. This proportion has remained consistent since mid-December; 74.0% of care homes had no staff members working in another health or social care setting, this proportion has gradually declined from 78.2% at the end of April 2021. Between May and mid-July, the number of positive PCR and LFD tests returned among care home staff and residents gradually increased but was still substantially lower than numbers in mid-January.

Last updated on hub: 13 August 2021

Adult social care monthly statistics, England: July 2021

Department of Health and Social Care

Experimental statistics on a range of topics including infection control measures, staffing levels, coronavirus (COVID-19) vaccinations and testing for COVID-19 in adult social care settings. As of 22 June 2021, the proportions who had received both doses of the COVID-19 vaccine were: 92.2% of residents and 72.8% of staff of older adult care homes; 86.1% of residents of younger adult care homes; 70.1% of staff of younger adult care homes, 57.8% of domiciliary care staff and 29.1% of staff employed in other social care settings. In the week ending 22 June 2021: 93% of care homes in England were able to accommodate residents receiving visitors within care homes, compared to 40.3% at the beginning of March 2021; 83.8% of care homes who had staff required to self-isolate paid those staff their full wages while self-isolating. This proportion has remained consistent since mid-December; 76.1% of care homes had no staff members working in another health or social care setting, this proportion has remained largely consistent since mid-December. Between mid-May and the end of June, there has been a gradual increase in the number of positive PCR and LFD tests returned from care home staff, but this is still substantially fewer compared to mid-January; the number of positive PCR and LFD tests returned from care home residents has been broadly stable and remains substantially lower than mid-January levels.

Last updated on hub: 12 July 2021

Adult social care monthly statistics, England: June 2021

Department of Health and Social Care

Experimental statistics on a range of topics including infection control measures, staffing levels, coronavirus (COVID-19) vaccinations and testing for COVID-19 in adult social care settings. As of 25 May 2021, the proportions who had received both doses of the COVID-19 vaccine were: 88.0% of residents and 65.7% of staff of older adult care homes; 79.4% of residents of younger adult care homes; 61.1% of staff of younger adult care homes, 48.0% of domiciliary care staff and 22.7% of staff employed in other social care settings. In the same week, 87.4% of care homes in England were able to accommodate residents receiving visitors within care homes, compared to 40.3% at the beginning of March 2021; 84.2% of care homes who had staff required to self-isolate paid those staff their full wages while self-isolating; 76.7% of care homes had no staff members working in another health or social care setting, this proportion has remained largely consistent since mid-December. There were 467,100 PCR tests and 498,456 LFD tests taken by care home staff. There were 230 positive results returned from PCR tests and 306 returned from LFD tests, this has substantially decreased for both kits compared to mid-January. There were 77,499 PCR tests and 8,920 LFD tests taken by care home residents. There were 61 positive results returned from PCR tests and 4 returned from LFD tests, this has substantially decreased for both kits compared to mid-January.

Last updated on hub: 12 July 2021

Adult social care monthly statistics, England: May 2021

Department of Health and Social Care

Experimental statistics on a range of topics including infection control measures, staffing levels, coronavirus (COVID-19) vaccinations and testing for COVID-19 in adult social care settings. As of 27 April 2021, the proportions who had received the first dose of the COVID-19 vaccine were: 94.6% of residents and 81.0% of staff of older adult care homes; 89.8% of residents of younger adult care homes; 77.5% of staff of younger adult care homes, 72.8% of domiciliary care staff and 70.7% of staff employed in other social care settings. In the week ending 26 April 2021: 82.5% of care homes in England were able to accommodate residents receiving visitors within care homes, compared to 40.3% at the beginning of March 2021; 83.6% of care homes who had staff required to self-isolate paid those staff their full wages while self-isolating; 78.2% of care homes had no staff members working in another health or social care setting, this proportion has remained largely consistent since mid-December. ln the week ending 27 April 2021: there were 480,530 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests and 505,822 lateral flow device (LFD) tests taken by care home staff. There were 319 positive results returned from PCR tests and 411 returned from LFD tests, this has substantially decreased for both kits compared to mid-January; there were 78,417 PCR tests and 7,905 LFD tests taken by care home residents.

Last updated on hub: 17 May 2021

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