COVID-19 resources on infection control

Results 201 - 210 of 394

Order by    Date Title

Taking extra care in lockdown: Ty Llwynderw Extra Care & Care and Cae’r Ysgol Independent Living bungalows, Maesteg

Housing LIN

This case study features Linc Cymru Housing Association’s development in Maesteg, Wales. It provides some context on why and how the scheme came about, reflects on its’ design and also captures how the scheme has coped under lockdown, successfully ensuring a Covid-free home to date. Flexing the design to respond to Coronavirus have in the main ensured that they functioned and adapted well for both the Maesteg and Tondu schemes. Operationally, staff were able to make changes so as to be able to use the building to best effect during the intense Covid-19 lockdown.

Last updated on hub: 17 September 2020

Cohorting, zoning and isolation practice: commissioning for resilient care home provision: a report to the Social Care Sector COVID-19 Task Force

Care England

Guidance on developing good practice in cohorting, zoning and isolation practice in care home settings as a means of ensuring the effective implementation of the Public Health England (PHE) national guidance and high standards of infection prevention and control. Various examples and documents already exist which exemplify notable practice and provide national guidance. This document brings some of this together to address particular questions for the Task Force. As well as providing advice to the Task Force, it might also act as a checklist for commissioners to assess what they have already done / might do. It is split as follows: context; some key principles to guide work in this area; describing good practice in cohorting – within existing provision, or in dedicated facilities; what this means for commissioners and how they work with care providers recognising the critical relationships between them; resource considerations; and practice examples and references.

Last updated on hub: 17 September 2020

Care home infection control top tips

North West Association of Directors of Adult Social Services

The purpose of this guide is to highlight some of the ways in which residential and nursing homes have responded to the Covid-19 pandemic in order to ensure that residents are safe, needs continue to be met and wellbeing is promoted, in what are very challenging and difficult circumstances. This guide has been compiled from desktop review of policy and best practice guidance, together with interviews with a selection of providers and commissioners from across the North West region. It aims to stimulate ideas on how providers and commissioners can develop and enhance services in the context of Covid-19, whilst simultaneously building future resilience into providers existing infection control plans. Topics covered include: the physical environment; staff; wellbeing; processes; and technology.

Last updated on hub: 17 September 2020

Making evidence and policy in public health emergencies: lessons from COVID-19 for adaptive evidence-making and intervention

Evidence and Policy

Background: In public health emergencies, evidence, intervention, decisions and translation proceed simultaneously, in greatly compressed timeframes, with knowledge and advice constantly in flux. Idealised approaches to evidence-based policy and practice are ill equipped to deal with the uncertainties arising in evolving situations of need. Key points for discussion: There is much to learn from rapid assessment and outbreak science approaches. These emphasise methodological pluralism, adaptive knowledge generation, intervention pragmatism, and an understanding of health and intervention as situated in their practices of implementation. The unprecedented challenges of novel viral outbreaks like COVID-19 do not simply require us to speed up existing evidence-based approaches, but necessitate new ways of thinking about how a more emergent and adaptive evidence-making might be done. The COVID-19 pandemic requires us to appraise critically what constitutes ‘evidence-enough’ for iterative rapid decisions in-the-now. There are important lessons for how evidence and intervention co-emerge in social practices, and for how evidence-making and intervening proceeds through dialogue incorporating multiple forms of evidence and expertise. Conclusions and implications: Rather than treating adaptive evidence-making and decision making as a break from the routine, we argue that this should be a defining feature of an ‘evidence-making intervention’ approach to health.

Last updated on hub: 09 September 2020

Visits to care homes: guidance for providers

Welsh Government

This guidance provides advice for care home providers on facilitating outdoor visits; indoor visits when the level of COVID-19 at a local or national level allows; indoor visits in exceptional circumstances including end of life; and people going out into the community and visiting family and friends. The guidance sets out an ethical framework to support people living and staying in care homes to reconnect safely with families, friends and professionals, consistent with the requirements of the wider coronavirus restrictions. The ultimate decision on whether, and in what circumstances care home visits take place rests with the individual provider, and some providers will find it more challenging to facilitate visits than others. However, this guidance is intended to support providers to enable visits to take place, and providers are expected and encouraged to facilitate visits wherever possible. [First published:25 June 2020; Last updated:10 November 2020]

Last updated on hub: 08 September 2020

Decision making in a crisis: first responses to the coronavirus pandemic

Institute for Government

This report examines the government’s initial response to the Covid-19 crisis, including the implications for the social care sector and workforce, and the decisions made in three areas: economic support, Covid-19 testing and the lockdown. It suggests that the response was hampered by the absence of a long-term strategy, lack of clarity about who was responsible for what and its poor use of evidence. The report also identifies how: the government needed to be clearer about the role of science advice and its limitations, particularly in the early stages of the crisis when it looked to its scientists to generate policy, not just advise on it; government decisions were influenced too much by concerns over NHS capacity rather than by controlling the spread of the virus; senior officials distanced themselves from the decision to reach 100,000 tests a day, and it was unclear who was responsible for different aspects of the testing regime, which made it difficult to assign responsibility for remedying gaps and failures; the government did not think about some of the most important aspects of how it would implement its policies until after it had announced them, leaving many public services, in particular schools and the police, playing catch up.

Last updated on hub: 08 September 2020

The rapid learning initiative into the transmission of COVID-19 into and within care homes in Northern Ireland

Northern Ireland. Department of Health

This report provides the findings of the Rapid Learning Initiative with regards to the transmission of Covid-19 into and within care homes during the first surge of the pandemic, and makes recommendations on the way forward prior to further potential surges of infection. It details the findings of each of the four sub-groups, which considered: the experience of residents, families and staff; symptom monitoring, interventions and testing; infection prevention and control; and physical distancing, reduced footfall and restricted visiting. The initiative identified three overarching structures and processes that will need to be established to support the delivery of outcomes and bring about a learning system that works across Heath and Social Care (HSCNI), including the independent sector and Trusts: at strategic level, the collaborative partnerships established for the purposes of the Initiative should continue and develop further to support future development of Strategy and Policy; a regional learning system should be developed and include key quality indicators for Care Homes (led by frontline staff) using real-time data that can for continuous improvement; and a quality improvement learning system should include building the capability and capacity within Care Home staff to use continuous improvement methodologies to implement operational improvement as a system.

Last updated on hub: 07 September 2020

COVID-19 Nursing Homes Expert Panel: examination of measures to 2021: report to the Minister for Health

Department of Health (Ireland)

This report provides a summary of the work conducted by the Nursing Homes Expert Panel, looking at the effectiveness and appropriateness of both national and international protective public health and other measures adopted to safeguard residents in nursing homes, in light of COVID-19. The evidence-informed and consultative approach taken by the Panel is described in Chapter 2. Chapter 3 presents an overview of relevant epidemiological information and data. Chapter 4 presents a summary and the results of a systematic evidence review completed under the direction of the Panel. Chapter 5 gives an overview of the results of a three-part consultation process conducted by the Expert Panel. Chapter 6 sets out the views and considerations of the Panel in respect of healthcare policy for older persons, and finally, Chapter 7 sets out the in-depth discussion on learning and the recommendations of the Panel. These address a number of thematic areas, including: public health measures; infection prevention and control; outbreak management; future admissions to nursing homes; nursing home management; . data analysis; community support teams; clinical – general practitioner lead roles on community support teams and in nursing homes; nursing home staffing/workforce; education-discipline-specific and inter-disciplinary; palliative care; visitors to nursing homes; and communication.

Last updated on hub: 07 September 2020

COVID-19: guidance for commissioners and providers of hostel services for people experiencing homelessness and rough sleeping

Public Health England

Information on coronavirus (COVID-19) for commissioners and providers of hostel services for people experiencing homelessness and rough sleeping. The guidance covers: hostels with individual self-contained rooms with en-suite facilities that have shared kitchens; and hostels without individual self-contained rooms and that have communal facilities. This guidance does not cover night shelters. [Published 16 March 2020; Last updated 14 December 2020]

Last updated on hub: 07 September 2020

Case studies

Care Home Professional

Brings together innovative examples of good practice in care homes. They case studies cover a range of topics, including responses to Covid-19; quality of care; the use of technology; social activities and entertainment; and helping residents stay connected.

Last updated on hub: 07 September 2020

Order by    Date Title