MCA resources on Independent Mental Capacity Advocacy

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Advocacy with people with learning disabilities and autistic people, who are subject to seclusion, segregation or restraint

VoiceAbility

Independent advocacy is crucial to make sure a person’s voice is heard and their human rights are protected. This is especially important when a person is subject to compulsory and restrictive powers. Consistent and effective advocacy must be provided to people who most require it, whenever they require it, including to people with learning disabilities, autism or both, who are subject to long term segregation. Improvement to the delivery and commissioning of advocacy is required to achieve this. This briefing highlights the key features of advocacy for people with learning disabilities, autism or both who are in long term segregation, which must be accessible, highly competent, holistic, independent and perceived to be so, connecting, supporting and joined up. The paper also sets out two commissioning options: national commissioning – the model could be specified clearly, activated promptly, its delivery easily monitored, and there would be a clear line of sight on the resources; and local commission – this would allow locally commissioned services to align with most existing statutory provision. Irrespective of the commissioning arrangements, the service must be able to undertake the full range of statutory advocacy duties, rather than referring the person on and requiring that they relate to several advocates. The paper conclude with eight recommendations, including ensuring that advocacy for people in long term segregation is provided on an opt-out basis, to ensure a greater number of people in long term segregation receive the timely advocacy support and representation they need for their voice to be heard and their rights upheld.

Last updated on hub: 05 January 2021

Your rights when detained under the Mental Health Act in England: forensic sections

Equality and Human Rights Commission

This introductory guide is for people detained under section 35, 36, 37, 37/41, 38, 45A, 47, 47/49, 48 or 48/49 of the Mental Health Act. These are people who are suspected or have been convicted of a crime and the courts and doctors have decided that they need to stay in a mental health hospital to get support and care for their mental health condition. The guide explains what rights individuals have and what should happen to them at different stages through their journey in hospital. There are six parts to this guide. The first four parts (A-D) relate to the different stages of stay in hospital in time order, covering: the decision to detain; being detained in hospital; staying in hospital; and leaving hospital. Part E explains how to make a complaint at any stage of one’s stay in hospital; and Part F explains some of the key terms used in this document.

Last updated on hub: 05 January 2021

Introductory guide: your rights when detained under the Mental Health Act in England: forensic sections

Equality and Human Rights Commission

This introductory guide is for people detained under section 35, 36, 37, 37/41, 38, 45A, 47, 47/49, 48 or 48/49 of the Mental Health Act. These are people who are suspected or have been convicted of a crime and the courts and doctors have decided that they need to stay in a mental health hospital to get support and care for their mental health condition. The guide explains what their rights are and what should happen to them at different stages through their journey in hospital. Sections cover: which section of the Mental Health Act can I be detained under; how should the decision to detain me be made; your right to speak to an independent mental health advocate; what can you or your nearest relative do if you think that you shouldn’t be in hospital; and additional guidance for people who need to stay in hospital and how disabled people can get extra help.

Last updated on hub: 05 January 2021

Your rights when detained under the Mental Health Act in England: civil sections

Equality and Human Rights Commission

This guide is for people detained under section 2 and 3 of the Mental Health Act or if you are staying in hospital as a voluntary patient. A voluntary patient (also called an informal patient) is someone who is in hospital but is not detained under the Mental Health Act. They can leave hospital at any time. However, if health professionals are concerned about their safety or the safety of others, they can stop them from leaving for up to 72 hours. The guide explains what rights individuals have and what should happen to them at different stages through their journey in hospital. There are six parts to this guide. The first four parts (A-D) relate to the different stages of stay in hospital in time order, covering: the decision to detain; being detained in hospital; staying in hospital; and leaving hospital. Part E explains how to make a complaint at any stage of one’s stay in hospital; and Part F explains some of the key terms used in this document.

Last updated on hub: 05 January 2021

Introductory guide: your rights when detained under the Mental Health Act in England: civil sections

Equality and Human Rights Commission

This introductory guide is for people detained under sections 2 and 3 of the Mental Health Act, or people who are in hospital as a voluntary patient. A voluntary patient (also called an informal patient) is someone who is in hospital but is not detained under the Mental Health Act. Sections cover: why am I being detained; how should the decision to detain me be made; your right to speak to an independent mental health advocate; what can you or your nearest relative do if you think that you shouldn’t be in hospital; and additional guidance for those who need to stay in hospital and extra help for disabled people.

Last updated on hub: 05 January 2021

“My next patient may lack capacity”

ASIST Advocacy Services

This guidance covers the key principle of the Mental Capacity Act, assessing capacity and inability to consent, best interests decision making for patients, independent mental capacity advocacy, and deprivation of liberty safeguards.

Last updated on hub: 19 September 2020

IMCA – appropriate to consult: a guide for health and social care staff

VoiceAbility

A guide for health and social care staff on how, and in which situations, a person can be referred to the Independent Mental Capacity Advocacy service.

Last updated on hub: 17 September 2020

Mental Capacity Act: making decisions. How to make decisions under the Mental Capacity Act 2005

Office of the Public Guardian

This page relates to decision making under the Mental Capacity Act (MCA). It provides information on the Code of Practice, health and care workers who give advice as part of their job, plus information about the Independent mental capacity advocate (IMCA) service and the benefits of the service.

Last updated on hub: 17 September 2020

Assessment of mental capacity policy

North East London NHS Foundation Trust

This policy has arisen from the implementation of the MCA 2005 and seeks to give advice and guidance on how and when an assessment of mental capacity should be carried out. It draws a distinction between routine/ongoing assessments of capacity, which is a part of everyday care, and more exceptional occasions, when a formal assessment is necessary. In the latter case a formal, documented assessment is now required by the Trust in defined instances.

Last updated on hub: 17 September 2020

Case study two: Mr R – dementia non-MCA compliant hospital discharge

Department of Health and Social Care

A case study focusing on dementia non-MCA compliant hospital discharge, without an appropriate advocate involved in the decision-making process. It explains how the IMCA involved raised concerns about how the hospital discharge process fits into the MCA and how important the role of an IMCA is in ensuring decisions are made in the best interests of the relevant individuals. The case study has been drawn together by the Department of Health, the Care Quality Commission, and POhWER, a major provider of advocacy services, showing how IMCAs can act as a powerful support to people who may lack capacity.

Last updated on hub: 16 September 2020

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