MCA resources on Independent Mental Capacity Advocacy

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IMCA and paid relevant person's representative roles in the Mental Capacity Act Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards

Social Care Institute for Excellence

This practice guidance describes the role of Independent Mental Capacity Advocates (IMCAs) and paid representatives in the Mental Capacity Act Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (MCA DOLS).

Last updated on hub: 13 June 2011

Independent Mental Capacity Advocate involvement in accommodation decisions and care reviews

Social Care Institute for Excellence

This guide aims to support the work of local authority and NHS staff who may need to instruct and work with IMCAs in relation to accommodation decisions and care reviews.

Last updated on hub: 13 June 2011

Introductory guide: your rights when detained under the Mental Health Act in England: civil sections

Equality and Human Rights Commission

This introductory guide is for people detained under sections 2 and 3 of the Mental Health Act, or people who are in hospital as a voluntary patient. A voluntary patient (also called an informal patient) is someone who is in hospital but is not detained under the Mental Health Act. Sections cover: why am I being detained; how should the decision to detain me be made; your right to speak to an independent mental health advocate; what can you or your nearest relative do if you think that you shouldn’t be in hospital; and additional guidance for those who need to stay in hospital and extra help for disabled people.

Last updated on hub: 05 January 2021

Introductory guide: your rights when detained under the Mental Health Act in England: forensic sections

Equality and Human Rights Commission

This introductory guide is for people detained under section 35, 36, 37, 37/41, 38, 45A, 47, 47/49, 48 or 48/49 of the Mental Health Act. These are people who are suspected or have been convicted of a crime and the courts and doctors have decided that they need to stay in a mental health hospital to get support and care for their mental health condition. The guide explains what their rights are and what should happen to them at different stages through their journey in hospital. Sections cover: which section of the Mental Health Act can I be detained under; how should the decision to detain me be made; your right to speak to an independent mental health advocate; what can you or your nearest relative do if you think that you shouldn’t be in hospital; and additional guidance for people who need to stay in hospital and how disabled people can get extra help.

Last updated on hub: 05 January 2021

Level 3 certificate / diploma in independent advocacy (3610-03/04)

City & Guilds

This handbook explains what is needed to deliver level 3 qualifications to learners who work as Independent Advocates in either an employed or voluntary capacity. These qualifications allow learners to learn, develop and practise the skills required for employment in an Independent Advocacy role.

Last updated on hub: 06 September 2020

Mental Capacity Act (MCA) 2005 and Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DOLS) 2009: training booklet

Dorset Council

This training handbook covers a full range of aspects and processes relating to mental capacity and deprivation of liberty, including best interests, independent mental capacity advocacy, advance decisions, lasting power of attorney.

Last updated on hub: 06 September 2020

Mental Capacity Act 2005 in practice: learning materials for adult social workers

Department of Health and Social Care

The Mental Capacity Act (MCA) was developed to co-ordinate, bring together and simplify the law about the care and treatment of people who lack capacity. This document provides information and guidance for adult social care workers on the key principles and provisions of the Mental Capacity Act 2005 and considers how social workers can apply its principles to their practice. Areas covered include Best interests, Advanced decisions, Five principles of the Act, Assessing capacity and decision making. It is designed to be used by social workers at all levels, from front line practitioners to senior social workers, social work supervisors and managers, to help social workers to develop their skills in supporting individuals who may lack mental capacity. The document includes short case examples and reflective exercises throughout.

Last updated on hub: 13 October 2015

Mental Capacity Act 2005: guidelines for undertaking Capacity Assessments and making Best Interest Decisions

Lincolnshire County Council

This guidance is intended to provide support in carrying out and recording formal capacity assessments and is not intended as a substitute for the Code of Practice. The documents covers: recording mental capacity assessment activity; principles of the mental capacity act 2005; when to assess capacity and who should carry out the assessment; assessments as part of needs or risk assessments and day to day decisions; capacity to agree to social care decisions; identifying the decision maker; advance statements and preferred place of care statements; capacity assessments; best interests decisions; independent mental capacity advocates; unwise decisions, duty of care, the role of the Court of Protection and inherent jurisdiction; and the role of the Court of Protection.

Last updated on hub: 02 September 2020

Mental Capacity Act Matters

Disability Matters

A Mental Capacity Act e-Learning course. This session covers the principles of the Mental Capacity Act and looks at how to assess capacity. It offers opportunities to reflect on aspects of the Mental Capacity Act and its practice.

Last updated on hub: 06 September 2020

Mental Capacity Act: level one awareness session

Shropshire Council

This training presentation introduces participants to the key messages of the Mental Capacity Act 2005 and explores the implications for different service areas. The document: lists the five guiding principles; explains what it means to lack capacity; explains who the decision maker is; describes the role of an IMCA and how to contact them; examines the offences of ill treatment and wilful neglect; provides a brief overview of the roles of the Court of Protection, Deputies and Lasting Power of Attorney.

Last updated on hub: 06 September 2020

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